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Marine parks

Marine parks established over tidal lands and waters protect and conserve the values of the natural marine environment while allowing for its sustainable use. They protect habitats including mangrove wetlands, seagrass beds, mudflats, sandbanks, beaches, rocky outcrops and fringing reefs.

Park boundaries can be established over tidal lands and waters up to the highest astronomical tide. The parks include the subsoil below and airspace above their boundaries, and the plants and animals within them.

Australia's first marine park was established in 1937 at Green Island, with the second declared over Heron and Wistari reefs in 1974.

The three state marine parks in Queensland are:

Have your say on new public moorings and reef protection markers in the Great Barrier Reef

The Queensland Government has announced additional funding for marine infrastructure in the Great Barrier Reef and is seeking your feedback to help prioritise locations for this infrastructure.

The new infrastructure will build upon an existing network of over 120 public moorings and 140 reef protection markers in place along the Great Barrier Reef (GBR). The Queensland Government is committed to expanding this network by installing an extra 100 public moorings and 150 reef protection markers over the next three years, including 10 new moorings recently delivered off the coast near Cairns.

Responses provided before 31 January 2017 will be used to inform and prioritise infrastructure in Keppel Bay and the Whitsundays in the 2016–17 financial year. Responses provided after 1 February 2017 will be used to prioritise projects for the 2017/18 and 2018/19 financial years, focusing on the Capricorn Cays to Mackay area and Townsville to Lizard Island areas, respectively.

In assessing priorities, we are considering the following:

  • location
  • the nature of the seabed (e.g. seagrass or coral coverage)
  • the nature of recreational boating in the area
  • the nature of commercial boating in the area (including tourism)
  • the location of sites of cultural or historical significance
  • distribution of infrastructure across the region
  • ease of access for infrastructure maintenance
  • costs and construction feasibility

Stakeholder and community input is a vital part of this project, so your feedback on this proposed marine infrastructure is important.

Rules change in Bowling Green Bay to help dugongs

The Queensland Government has extended the current netting restrictions in Bowling Green Bay to also cover intertidal areas (from low water to the high water mark). These changes complement Commonwealth Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority measures to protect dugongs.

Read more about the changes.

Changes to the Lady Musgrave Reef site management arrangements

The Queensland Government, in conjunction with the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, has amended the Lady Musgrave Reef site management arrangements to continue to provide protection of the reef's unique biodiversity, while providing opportunities for the use of and access of the site.

The Lady Musgrave Reef site management arrangements and further information on how the arrangements where developed, can be found at the GBRMPA webpage.

Recreational aircraft use in Moreton Bay Marine Park

Consultation has closed on a proposal to remove permit requirements for recreational aircraft use in Moreton Bay Marine Park.

Read about the proposal.

Enhanced access for authorised commercial whale watching operators within the Great Sandy and Moreton Bay Marine Parks

Changes have been made to the area restrictions on commercial whale watching within the Great Sandy and Moreton Bay Marine Parks.

Read about the proposed changes.

Changes to commercial bait netting in conservation park (yellow) zones in state marine parks

The Queensland Government has amended state marine park zoning plans to clarify provisions for commercial bait netting in conservation park (yellow) zones.

Read about the changes.

Fishing in marine parks

Fishing is prohibited in some marine park zones. Some marine parks are adjacent to terrestrial and island national parks and, depending on the zoning, fishing in these waters may also be prohibited.

Please contact your local QPWS office or consult the relevant zoning plan for information on fishing restrictions in these areas.

Legislation

The Marine Parks Act 2004 (PDF) commenced on 31 August 2006, together with the Marine Parks Regulation 2006 (PDF) and Marine Parks (Declaration) Regulation 2006 (PDF).

Last updated
21 November 2016