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About Beerburrum and Beerwah

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Getting there and getting around

View from Glass House Mountains lookout day-use area. Photo: Ross Naumann.

View from Glass House Mountains lookout day-use area. Photo: Ross Naumann.

About 70km north of Brisbane, the extensive forest areas of Beerburrum and Beerwah State Forests are located on both sides of the Bruce Highway. The forests extend north from Caboolture to Caloundra, and from Pumicestone Passage west to Woodford.

There are separate access routes to each of the recreation nodes.

Coochin Creek camping area is located on the eastern side of the Bruce Highway (M1) with access off Roys Road. Traffic travelling north from Brisbane on the Bruce Highway can't turn right into Roys Road. Instead continue north to Caloundra interchange and return southbound on the Bruce Highway to the Roys Road turnoff.

Glass House Mountains lookout, located in Beerburrum West State Forest, has views over all the Glass House Mountains. From the Bruce Highway (M1) turn off onto the Glass House Mountains Tourist Drive 24 (Steve Irwin Way)—from the south, take the Beerburrum exit; from the north, take the Landsborough exit. From Steve Irwin Way there are multiple routes to connect to the Old Gympie Road—from Beerburrum via the Beerburrum-Woodford Road; or from Beerwah via the Kilcoy–Beerwah Road; or from just south of Glass House Mountains via Barrs and Marshs Roads. Turn off Old Gympie Road onto the Glass House–Woodford Road, and follow this for approximately 3km to the Glass House Mountains lookout.

The Glass House Mountains Visitor and Interpretive Centre is a great place to visit first for an orientation to the area. This accredited tourist information centre is located at Settler's Rotary Park, Reed Street, Glass House Mountains (open daily 9am to 5pm).

Wheelchair accessibility

The toilets at Coochin Creek and the Glass House Mountains lookout are wheelchair accessible.

Forest features

Coochin Creek camping area is on the banks of Coochin Creek, in Beerwah State Forest. Photo: Ross Naumann, NPRSR volunteer.

Coochin Creek camping area is on the banks of Coochin Creek, in Beerwah State Forest. Photo: Ross Naumann, NPRSR volunteer.

Beerburrum and Beerwah State Forests include exotic pine plantations, open eucalypt forest, rainforest and coastal wallum remnants. Short walks explore the forests and lead to spectacular views of the Glass House Mountains area.

There are recreation opportunities in these parks for four-wheel-driving, trail bike riding, horse riding and mountain bike riding on established forest roads.

At Coochin Creek camping and day-use area, the mangrove-lined creek provides a great place for fishing and exploring the waterway in canoes and small boats. The creek flows into the sheltered waters of Pumicestone passage in Moreton Bay Marine Park, an area known for its excellent boating and fishing opportunities. 

Read more about the nature, culture and history of the Glass House Mountains area.

Camping and accommodation

Camping

The Coochin Creek camping area in Beerwah State Forest is ideal for visitors who enjoy fishing and boating. You can reach the camping area by conventional vehicle.

Facilities include wheelchair-accessible toilets, communal fire rings, tent, camper trailer and caravan sites.

Camp sites are numbered and individual camp site details are provided so visitors can book a site most suitable for their tent, camper trailer, campervan or caravan.

Coochin Creek camping area map and individual camp site details (PDF, 386K)*—use this detailed information with photos to choose a site that suits your needs and camping style—caravan, campervan, camper trailer or tent.

A terraced area provides vantage points for fishing from the creek bank. It is also possible to launch a canoe into the creek.

Pets are not permitted at the camping area.

Preferably bring a fuel stove. Open fires are only permitted in the fire rings provided. Bring your own clean milled firewood. It is illegal to collect wood from the State forest.

Use insect repellent to deter mosquitoes and sandflies.

Camping permits are required and fees apply.

There are also private camping areas on the Glass House Mountains Road—see the tourism information links for further information.

Other accommodation

A range of holiday accommodation is available in the Sunshine Coast area. For more information see the tourism information links.

Things to do

Glass House Mountains lookout track in Beerburrum West State Forest. Photo: Ross Naumann, NPRSR volunteer.

Glass House Mountains lookout track in Beerburrum West State Forest. Photo: Ross Naumann, NPRSR volunteer.

Wild Horse Mountain, paved track to the lookout from the car park. Photo: Ross Naumann, NPRSR volunteer.

Wild Horse Mountain, paved track to the lookout from the car park. Photo: Ross Naumann, NPRSR volunteer.

360 degree views from the Wild Horse Mountain lookout. Photo: Ross Naumann, NPRSR volunteer.

360 degree views from the Wild Horse Mountain lookout. Photo: Ross Naumann, NPRSR volunteer.

Western view from Wild Horse Mountain lookout. Photo: Ross Naumann, NPRSR volunteer.

Western view from Wild Horse Mountain lookout. Photo: Ross Naumann, NPRSR volunteer.

Great vantage points for fishing are provided at Coochin Creek camping and day-use area. Photo: Ross Naumann, NPRSR volunteer

Great vantage points for fishing are provided at Coochin Creek camping and day-use area. Photo: Ross Naumann, NPRSR volunteer

Day-use areas

There are picnic tables, wheelchair-accessible toilets and gas barbecues at Coochin Creek day-use area and Glass House Mountains lookout day-use area.

At Coochin Creek day-use area a terraced area provides vantage points for fishing from the creek bank. It is also possible to launch a canoe into the creek. You may need to use insect repellent to deter mosquitoes and sandflies in this area.

Walking

Short walks explore the forests and lead to spectacular views of the Glass House Mountains area.

All walks in these forests are Grade 3 tracking tracks:

  • Gently sloping, well-defined track with slight inclines or few steps.
  • Caution needed on loose gravel surfaces and exposed natural lookouts.
  • Reasonable level of fitness and ankle-supporting footwear required.

Track descriptions

(Numbers in brackets are map references).

(1) Glass House Mountains lookout track (Class 3)

Distance: 800m return
Time: 45mins

Details: The lookout is about 10km from the Glass House Mountains township, in Beerburrum West State Forest. It offers panoramic views of the mountain peaks, Caloundra, Maroochydore, Brisbane and Moreton Island. A short walking track starting at the lookout leads you through open scribbly gum forest, down through a wet eucalypt forest gully and returns back to the lookout.

(2) Wild Horse Mountain lookout track (Class 3)

Elevation: 123m
Distance: 1.4km return
Time: 1hr

Details: This site is managed by HQPlantations Pty Ltd.

The Wild Horse Mountain lookout is in Beerburrum State Forest, east of the Bruce Highway. The turnoff is signed Wild Horse Mountain summit lookout exit, and Exit 171. Drive along Johnston Road to the lookout.

Named after the brumbies that once lived there, Wild Horse Mountain offers a paved track to the lookout from the car park. Enjoy 360-degree views of Pumicestone Passage, coastal plains, the Glass House Mountains and exotic pine forestry plantations from the sheltered fire tower platform.

Boating and fishing

Coochin Creek is an estuary into the Pumicestone Passage and is a great place to go boating and fishing.

During winter the passage between Bells Creek and Caloundra Bar is one of South East Queensland's principal spawning areas for yellowfin bream. Flathead, bream, whiting, tailor and mangrove jack are often caught around Bribie Island. Many people catch sand and mud crabs during the summer months.

Beside the Coochin Creek camping and day-use area a terrace onto the creek provides vantage points for fishing from the creek bank. It is also possible to launch a canoe into the creek.

A public boat ramp provides deep water access to Pumicestone Passage at the end of Roys Road, approximately 7 km east of Coochin Creek camping area.

Pumicestone Passage is part of the Moreton Bay Marine Park. Recreational fishing activities are permitted in the marine park, except in the Tripcony Bight–Long Island and Westaways Creek marine national park zones (see Moreton Bay Marine Park zoning map (PDF, 2.7M)*). Fishing, crabbing, bait collecting and other forms of harvesting are prohibited in these zones. Important habitats including mudflats, seagrass beds, mangroves, saltmarsh and claypan communities are protected here.

Four-wheel-driving and trail bike riding

Four-wheel-drive vehicles and trail bikes may be driven on roads in Beerburrum and Beerwah State Forests.

Drivers must be fully licensed and their vehicle/s must be road-registered. Conditionally registered vehicles are not permitted.

For your safety and to minimise damage to the forest, stay on existing roads. Observe and comply with the instructions on all signs.

Forest roads are accessible to visitors, subject to forestry operations and weather conditions. If driving on forest roads please read the following:

  • Ensure your vehicle is mechanically sound—carry essential spares, water, tyre gauge, and air pump.
  • Please obey speed limits and road rules—the maximum speed limit on forest roads is 50 km/hr. All normal road rules apply on forest tracks and roads.
  • Watch out for the unexpected—slow down to allow time to react to changed road conditions, especially on gravel roads.
  • Be aware of logging operations—heavy machinery may be in use within forestry areas at certain times. Please obey advisory notices regarding logging operations.
  • Be aware of wet weather—please obey advisory notices regarding wet weather conditions. Access is not permitted in wet weather or when road is soft and muddy.

Horse riding and mountain bike riding

Horses and mountain bikes can be ridden on roads in Beerburrum and Beerwah State Forests.

Read about the SEQ horse riding trail networks in the Caboolture, Bellthorpe, Kenilworth and Mapleton region.

Things to know before you go

Essentials to bring

  • Adequate drinking water and food
  • A first-aid kit and insect repellent
  • Mobile phone
  • Suitable shoes
  • Sunscreen, a hat and long-sleeved shirt for sun protection.
  • If camping at Coochin Creek camping area, preferably bring a fuel stove. Bring clean-milled firewood—such as untreated mill cut-offs—if you are intending to use the fire rings provided. It is illegal to collect wood from the State forest.

Opening hours

Beerburrum and Beerwah State Forests are open 24 hours a day.

For your safety: bushwalk, drive and ride in Beerburrum and Beerwah State Forests in daylight hours only.

Permits and fees

Camping permits are required and fees apply.

Permits are required for commercial activites and organised group activities.

Pets

Dogs on leashes are permitted at Glass House Mountains lookout and Wild Horse Mountain lookout in Beerburrum State Forest.

Domestic animals are not permitted at Coochin Creek camping and day-use area in Beerwah State Forest.

Climate and weather

The Glass House Mountains area has a mild, subtropical climate. In summer, the average daily temperature ranges from 18 to 28°C and in winter from 11 to 20°C. For more information see the tourism information links.

Fuel and supplies

Fuel and supplies are available at at nearby local townships. For more information see the tourism information links.

Staying safe

  • Avoid walking during wet weather. Tracks can be slippery, especially after rain.
  • Never walk alone—if something happens to you someone in your group can go for help.
  • Walk to your ability and fitness levels.
  • Supervise children at all times.
  • Carry enough drinking water, mobile phone and insect repellent.
  • Carry a first-aid kit and know how to use it.
  • Wear suitable shoes.
  • Plan to complete your walk before dark.
  • Protect yourself from the sun. Wear sunscreen, a hat and long-sleeved shirt, even on cloudy days.
  • Explore the forest at cooler times of the day to avoid heat exhaustion on hot days.
  • Tell friends or family where you are going and when you expect to return. If you change your plans inform them.
  • Observe and comply with all regulatory and closure signs.

For more information, please read the guidelines on safety in parks and forests.

Looking after the forest

You can help protect the natural environment and help ensure the survival of native plants and animals living here, by following these guidelines.

  • Everything within the State forest is protected. Do not take or interfere with plants, animals, soil or rocks.
  • Do not feed or leave food for animals. Human food can harm wildlife and cause some animals to become aggressive.
  • Stay on the track. Do not cut corners or create new tracks.
  • Take rubbish home with you for appropriate disposal. Bins are not provided.
  • Obey signs and safety notices.

See the guidelines on caring for parks and forests for more information about protecting our environment and heritage in parks and forests.

Forest management

The Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service (QPWS) of the Department of National Parks, Recreation, Sport and Racing (NPRSR) manages the Coochin Creek camping area, Glass House Mountains lookout and associated walking tracks in these forests.

HQPlantations Pty Ltd. manages the exotic pine planation areas and Wild Horse Mountain lookout.

Tourism information links

For more information about activities, tours and accommodation in this region, contact:

Sunshine Coast Destinations Ltd 
www.scdl.com.au 

ph 1800 644 969 (within Australia)
email info@scdl.com.au

Glass House Mountains Visitor Information Centre
www.visitsunshinecoast.com.au 
Cnr Reed St and Bruce Parade
Glass House Mountains, Qld 4518
ph (07) 5438 7220 or 1800 644 969

Sunshine Coast Destinations has another eight accredited Visitor Information Centres across the Sunshine Coast providing a range of local and regional tourist brochures and information, as well as a tour, attraction and accommodation booking service.

  • 7 Caloundra Road, Caloundra
  • 77 Bulcock Street, Caloundra
  • Jessica Park, Nicklin Way, Minyama
  • 198 Main Road, Montville
  • Cnr Melrose Parade and Sixth Avenue, Cotton Tree (Maroochydore)
  • Cnr First Ave and Brisbane Rd, Mooloolaba
  • Tickle Park, David Low Way, Coolum Beach
  • Arrivals Terminal, Sunshine Coast Airport, Marcoola

For tourism information for all regions in Queensland see www.queenslandholidays.com.au.

Further information

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Last updated
19 June 2014