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About Blencoe Falls

Getting there and getting around

Blencoe Falls can be accessed from both inland and from the coast via unsealed roads that should only be attempted in dry conditions—four-wheel-drive vehicles are recommended. Be aware that flooding may occur during the wetter months (December to April), particularly at Cashmere Crossing and Blencoe Creek bridge.

Access from the coast is via Kirrama Range Road. At Kennedy, 10km north of Cardwell, turn west and travel 6km to the base of Kirrama Range and a further 24km to Society Flat, Kirrama Range National Park. Continue another 44km to Blencoe Falls camping area. To access Herbert River Gorge lookout and Blencoe Falls lookout, continue 1.4km past the camping area to the signposted turn-off, then 5.2km to the parking area.

If travelling from inland, follow Gunnawarra Road (from its junction with the Kennedy Highway, 4km west of Mount Garnet) 55km then turn left onto Kirrama–Cashmere Road. Travel 45km along Kirrama-Cashmere Road to the signposted track to the Blencoe Falls and Herbert River Gorge lookouts. From here either turn and follow the track 5.2km to the lookout parking area, or continue another 1.4km to Blencoe Falls camping area.

Check park alerts and with the Department of Transport and Main Roads for local road conditions and river heights. The Bureau of Meteorology provides updated weather reports.

Wheelchair accessibility

No wheelchair-accessible tracks or facilities are provided at Blencoe Falls, Girringun National Park.

Park features

Herbert River Gorge, Girringun National Park. Photo: Photographer Steven Nowakowski, © NPSR.

Herbert River Gorge, Girringun National Park. Photo: Photographer Steven Nowakowski, © NPSR.

Blencoe Falls, Girringun National Park boasts spectacular scenery and an array of plant and animal life. The falls plunge 90 m to the pool below, before cascading a further 230 m to the base of the gorge. Just as impressive is the Herbert River Gorge with its towering cliffs and dry, rugged ridges.

Open forest dominates the escarpments and she-oaks line the Herbert River. Along the gullies and upper slopes of the Herbert River Gorge, vine-thicket rainforest scattered with hoop pines persists.

In the open forest, animals such as the elegant whiptail wallaby and gangly emu try to find sanctuary from the heat. In the river and creeks, freshwater turtles can be seen basking on logs or peering through the surface of the water.

Natural, cultural and historical values make this region a truly special place. We invite you to explore the park, learn about its history and enjoy the diverse plant and animal life.

Read more about the nature, culture and history of Blencoe Falls, Girringun National Park.

Camping and accommodation

Camping

Walk-in and vehicle-based camping is available at Blencoe Falls camping area. Toilets are provided and water can be collected from Blencoe Creek—treat all water before use. Camping permits are required and fees apply. A tag with your booking number must be displayed at your camp site.

  • Find out more about camping at Blencoe Falls, Girringun National Park.

To avoid trampling vegetation, disturbing wildlife and causing erosion, please keep your four-wheel-drive vehicle on marked tracks. Failure to stay on the track may incur a penalty.

If you prefer to rough it, then limited bush camping opportunities exist as part of the Wet Tropics Great Walk. These are hike-in sites and campers need to be totally self-sufficient.

Other accommodation

There is a range of holiday accommodation in and around Atherton, Ravenshoe, Mount Garnet, Cardwell and Tully.

For more information, see the tourism information links.

Things to do

Herbert River Gorge lookout, Girringun National Park. Photo: NPSR.

Herbert River Gorge lookout, Girringun National Park. Photo: NPSR.

Walking

Blencoe Falls provides a gateway to the Wet Tropics Great Walk. With 110 km of walking opportunities, including short and overnight walks, there is something for everyone.

Blencoe Falls lookout (grade: easy)

Distance: 400 m return

Time: allow 20 mins walking time

Details: to access this walk, drive 1 km north-west of the camping area and turn left where signed. It is 5.2 km to the car park near which the Herbert River Gorge lookout provides amazing views of the Herbert River as it meanders its way through the gorge.

At the lookout, soak up the sights and sounds of the falls as they race towards the Herbert River. Blencoe Falls plunges 90 m to the pool below, before cascading a further 230 m to the base of the gorge. Relic hoop pines shrouded in mist create an eerie feeling. Enjoy the view but remain behind the safety fence at all times and supervise children carefully.

Jabali walk (grade: moderate)

Distance: 5 km return

Time: allow 1.5–2 hrs walking time

Details: The Jabali (pronounced Ju-bah-li and meaning 'whiptail wallaby') walk starts just west of the camping area and allows visitors to discover the rugged country of the Australian bush. The walk travels through open eucalypt forest as it meanders towards the Blencoe Falls lookout. Return the same way or arrange for a pick up at the Blencoe Falls lookout car park.

Fishing

Fishing is permitted in Girringun National Park. Size, take and possession limits apply. Contact the Fisheries Queensland for further information. Estuarine crocodiles live in the Herbert River and have been seen near the base of the Herbert River Falls—always remember to be crocwise in croc country.

Things to know before you go

Blencoe Falls, Girringun National Park is remote and help can be hours away. Remember to tell a responsible person where you are going and when you expect to return. Have a contingency plan in place if you fail to contact them by the agreed time. If you change your plans, inform them. Be aware that mobile phone coverage is limited.

Essentials to bring

Blencoe Falls is a remote area and visitors must be self-sufficient. Remember to pack:

  • a first-aid kit including a space blanket
  • adequate clothing including wet-weather gear
  • sturdy, reliable footwear
  • a hat, sunscreen and sunglasses
  • insect repellent
  • adequate water-carrying containers
  • a water treatment device for treating all drinking water
  • at least one form of emergency communication equipment—mobile phone coverage is limited
  • rubbish bags
  • firewood (collecting firewood in Girringun National Park is prohibited).

Opening hours

Girringun National Park is open 24 hours a day. Some walks may be closed during the wetter months, between December and April. Additional closures may occur for management purposes including pest plant and pest animal control. See park alerts for up-to-date information.

Permits and fees

Camping permit

Camping permits are required and fees apply for camping in Girringun National Park. Your booking number must be displayed at your camp site.

  • Find out more about camping at Blencoe Falls, Girringun National Park.

Other permits

Permits are required for commercial or organised group activities. Contact us for further information.

Pets

Domestic animals are not permitted in Girringun National Park.

Climate and weather

High rainfall summers and drier winters characterise the North-East Queensland tropical savanna region. Daytime temperatures and humidity can be high at any time of the year and nights can be very cool. In July the average overnight minimum temperatures are between 9 °C and 18 °C. Temperatures may drop as low as 0 °C and frosts can occur in elevated areas. Please carry suitable clothing to accommodate all extremes. July to October are generally the driest months, but heavy rain can fall at any time.

For more information see the tourism information links.

Weather forecasts are available from the Bureau of Meteorology.

Fuel and supplies

Fuel and supplies are available from local towns such as Ravenshoe and Mount Garnet.

Staying safe

Blencoe Falls, Girringun National Park is remote and help can be hours away. Remember to tell a responsible person where you are going and when you expect to return. Have a contingency plan in place if you fail to contact them by the agreed time. If you change your plans, inform them. Be aware that mobile phone coverage is limited.

  • In the event of an emergency, communication equipment is vital. Carry at least one form of communication equipment. Mobile phone coverage is very limited and should not be relied upon as the only form of emergency communication. In case of an emergency, if network coverage is available, dial Triple Zero (000) or 112.
  • Cattle may be encountered in the camping area. Never startle or approach these animals and ensure they have a clear path to get away.
  • Never jump or dive into water.
  • Take care around cliffs, steep slopes and rock faces along tracks and at lookouts.
  • Supervise children closely.
  • Protect yourself from the sun. Wear sunscreen, a hat and a long-sleeved shirt, even on cloudy days.
  • Carry adequate drinking water. Treat all water before drinking.
  • Estuarine crocodiles live in the Herbert River Gorge. Please remember to be crocwise in croc country.

For more information, please read the guidelines on safety in parks and forests.

Looking after the park

  • Wash at least 50 m from the creek. Use gritty sand and a scourer instead of soap to clean dishes. Scatter water so that it filters through the soil before returning to the creek.
  • Rubbish facilities are not provide—take your rubbish home with you.
  • Check your clothing and shoes regularly for seeds and dispose of them in your rubbish to avoid the spread of weeds.
  • Domestic animals are not permitted in national parks as they can disturb and harm wildlife.
  • Do not chase, scare or feed animals.
  • Camp only in designated camp sites.
  • Use toilets provided.
  • To avoid trampling vegetation, disturbing wildlife and causing erosion, please keep your four-wheel-drive vehicle on marked tracks. Failure to stay on the track may incur a penalty.
  • Remember, this area is a national park—everything is protected.

See the guidelines on caring for parks for more information about protecting our environment and heritage in parks.

Park management

Blencoe Falls, Girringun National Park was gazetted as part of Lumholtz National Park in 2000 before a name change in 2003. Girringun National Park is managed by Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service for the purposes of nature conservation and nature-based recreation.

Tourism information links

Atherton Tableland Information Centre
www.athertoninformationcentre.com.au
Corner Silo Road and Main Street, Atherton QLD 4883
Phone: (07) 4091 4222
Email:

Ravenshoe Visitor Centre
www.ravenshoevisitorcentre.com.au
24 Moore Street, Ravenshoe QLD 4888
Phone: (07) 4097 7700
Email:

Rainforest and Reef Information Centre
www.greatgreenwaytourism.com
 142 Victoria Street, Cardwell QLD 4849
Phone: (07) 4066 8601 
Email: A partnership between QPWS and the Cassowary Coast Regional Council, managed by Great Green Way Tourism Incorporated.

For tourism information for all regions in Queensland see Queensland Holidays.

Further information

Contact us
Last updated
15 September 2016