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About D'Aguilar National Park

Getting there and getting around

Enoggera Reservoir serves as a scenic backdrop to Walkabout Creek Visitor Centre, the gateway to the southern section of the park. Photo courtesy of Jason Flesser.

Enoggera Reservoir serves as a scenic backdrop to Walkabout Creek Visitor Centre, the gateway to the southern section of the park. Photo courtesy of Jason Flesser.

Rocky Hole, Mount Mee section of D'Aguilar National Park. Photo: NPRSR.

Rocky Hole, Mount Mee section of D'Aguilar National Park. Photo: NPRSR.

D’Aguilar National Park lies on the doorstep of Brisbane, Queensland's capital city. The park is divided into two distinct sections—South D’Aguilar section (formerly Brisbane Forest Park) and Mount Mee section (formerly Mount Mee State Forest and Forest Reserve).

South D’Aguilar section

South D’Aguilar section is easily accessible from Brisbane. The park’s picnic areas, walking tracks and lookouts are between 15 and 95-minute drive from the city centre. Access is via Mount Nebo Road (tourist route number 8) from The Gap, or via Samford along Samford and Mount Glorious roads (tourist route number 9).

Visit Walkabout Creek Visitor Centre before you embark on your journey. Walkabout Creek is located at 60 Mount Nebo Road in The Gap, 12 km from the city centre.

Mount Mee section

Mount Mee section encompasses the northern section of the park and extends to Woodford. This section of the park is about 90-minutes drive north-west of Brisbane. From the south, travel through Samford and Dayboro then follow Mount Mee Road (tourist route number 29) and Sellin Road into the park. From the north, turn left off the D’Aguilar Highway at Neurum Road (just north of Woodford) and follow it as far as Stanton Road. Turn left onto Stanton Road, then take the first right to stay on Stanton Road before turning right onto Rasmussen Road. Continue on Rasmussen Road for about 5 km to the northern entrance of the park. A four-wheel-drive vehicle is recommended to access the park beyond The Gantry day-use area.

Wheelchair accessibility

Wheelchair-accessible facilities are provided at Walkabout Creek, parts of Bellbird Grove (Black Wattle shelter shed and Rose Gum toilets), Jollys Lookout, Maiala, Westridge outlook, Wivenhoe outlook, White and Red Cedar, The Gantry, Lomandra and Ironbark Gully day-use areas. The Piccabeen walk in Mount Mee section is suitable for wheelchairs with assistance. Refer to the D'Aguilar National Park locality map (PDF, 609K)* for these locations.

Park features

The view from Westridge outlook, D'Aguilar National Park. Photo courtesy of Jason Flesser.

The view from Westridge outlook, D'Aguilar National Park. Photo courtesy of Jason Flesser.

A large variety of plant communities are found in the park. Photo courtesy of Jason Flesser.

A large variety of plant communities are found in the park. Photo courtesy of Jason Flesser.

D’Aguilar National Park is striking in its diversity of environments and plant communities. Take a journey through open eucalypt woodlands, scribbly gum forests and lush subtropical rainforests. More than 800 plant species are found in these forests, some of which are rare and threatened.

The cool mountain tops and forest flats of D’Aguilar National Park provide a rich and varied habitat for wildlife. The cooler mountain climate is ideal for ferns and mosses. Great barred frogs and spiny crayfish inhabit the mountain streams, while yellow-bellied gliders and short-eared possums are active at night in the tall open forest. Owls, like the vulnerable powerful owl, also live here, preying on small animals including possums and snakes. The park provides excellent birdwatching opportunities—bowerbirds, wompoo fruit-doves, bell miners and yellow-tailed black-cockatoos can often be seen or heard throughout the forest.

For a close-up look at some amazing native animals, visit Walkabout Creek. The complex features a visitor information centre, wedding centre, cafe and the South East Queensland Wildlife Centre, which showcases the area’s incredible wildlife.

Camping and accommodation

Remote bush camping in south D'Aguilar section, D'Aguilar National Park. Photo: NPRSR.

Remote bush camping in south D'Aguilar section, D'Aguilar National Park. Photo: NPRSR.

Camping

There is vehicle-based and bush camping facilities located throughout D’Aguilar National Park (see the South D’Aguilar forest trail map (PDF, 624K)* and Mount Mee forest trail and drive map (PDF, 208K)* for camp site locations).

Camping permits are required and fees apply. A camping tag with your booking number must be displayed at your camp site.

Other accommodation

There is a range of holiday accommodation in and around Brisbane, Mount Glorious, Samford and Dayboro. For more information see the tourism information links.

Things to do

Take a bushwalk along one of the many walking tracks in D'Aguilar National Park. Photo: NPRSR.

Take a bushwalk along one of the many walking tracks in D'Aguilar National Park. Photo: NPRSR.

Enjoy a scenic forest drive in the Mount Mee section of the park. Photo: NPRSR.

Enjoy a scenic forest drive in the Mount Mee section of the park. Photo: NPRSR.

Visit the South East Queensland Wildlife Centre at Walkabout Creek—a living showcase of the region's wildlife. Photo: NPRSR.

Visit the South East Queensland Wildlife Centre at Walkabout Creek—a living showcase of the region's wildlife. Photo: NPRSR.

The D’Aguilar Range offers many opportunities for visitors to explore and enjoy the natural surrounds:

Driving and trail-bike riding

South D'Aguilar section

These scenic drives are accessible by two-wheel-drive vehicle in south D’Aguilar section. There are no four-wheel-driving or trail-bike riding opportunities in the south D’Aguilar section of the park.

Mount Nebo Road

A beautiful scenic drive winding through eucalypt forest, this road runs through the park past Mount Nebo township to Mount Glorious. There are several lookouts along the way. Return to Brisbane along the same road or via Samford − Mount Glorious Road.

The Northbrook Parkway

The Northbrook Parkway continues from Mount Glorious, linking D’Aguilar National Park with the eastern shore of Lake Wivenhoe. For an interesting round trip, travel back to Brisbane via Samford − Mount Glorious Road or the Brisbane Valley Highway.

Mount Mee section

Vehicles, including trail bikes, are permitted on all forest drives and unsealed roads in Mount Mee unless otherwise signed. Some roads and trails are designated non-motorised areas in the interest of visitor safety (see the map (PDF, 208K)* for road and trail designations). Four-wheel-drive vehicles are advised for all unsealed roads in Mount Mee. Vehicle permits are not required; however, all vehicles (including trail bikes)must be registered and driven by a licensed driver.

Please obey all park closure notices. Mount Mee is closed after heavy rain—check park alerts before visiting for the latest information about park access, closures and conditions.

  • Obey speed limits. The maximum speed limit on forest drives is 50 km/hr. Normal road rules apply. All forest drives allow two-way traffic.
  • Watch out for the unexpected. Drive slowly to allow time to react to changed road conditions and other park users.
  • Forest drives are unsealed with some sharp curves, narrow sections, loose surfaces and steep grades that require careful driving.
  • Ensure your vehicle is mechanically sound.

The following drives in Mount Mee section are accessible by four-wheel-drive vehicle and trail bikes.

Western escarpment forest drive

For a 14 km scenic drive, journey along the Western escarpment forest drive through scribbly gum forest and stop at Somerset lookout to take in spectacular views to the west over Lake Somerset and Wivenhoe.

Mount Mee forest drive

Start a 16 km adventure on the Mount Mee forest drive at The Gantry. Head north-west through native and plantation forests to Falls lookout and Bulls Falls. Continue on to Mill rainforest walk and stop for a tranquil walk, then head to Rocky Hole and relax by the cool water before driving to Broadwater—a great picnic spot. Return to The Gantry or continue north through the small township of Woodford.

Range Road forest drive

For a 27 km experience start at The Gantry and drive along the Range Road forest drive. This drive takes you through open eucalypt forest and rainforest along the highest point of the range. Stop at Kluvers lookout for spectacular views. Finish your drive by visiting the small township of Dayboro.

See the Mount Mee forest trail and drive map (PDF, 208K)* for other roads accessible to four-wheel-drive vehicles and trail bikes.

Picnic areas and attractions

Attractions in south D’Aguilar section

Walkabout Creek

Located at 60 Mount Nebo Road in The Gap, 12 km from Brisbane’s city centre, Walkabout Creek features: a visitor centre, South East Queensland Wildlife Centre, Walkabout Creek Conference and Wedding Centre and the Green Tree Frog Cafe. For more information see the Walkabout Creek web page.

Bellbird Grove

Off Mount Nebo Road, Bellbird Grove is just a 10-minute drive from Walkabout Creek. Stop and enjoy a picnic or barbecue at the large, open picnic area or take a short walk along one of the walking tracks. Parking, toilets, picnic tables, gas barbecues and water (treat before drinking) are provided.

A sheltered picnic area (Red Ash) may be hired for exclusive use. For further information about bookings and fees, please contact Permits and Licence Management.

McAfees lookout

Named after the first settlers in the area, McAfees lookout is a popular stopping point for visitors on the way to Mount Nebo. A 15-minute drive from Walkabout Creek off Mount Nebo Road, this lookout provides breathtaking views of Moreton Bay from the viewing platform.

Camp Mountain lookout

Camp Mountain lookout is off Mount Nebo Road, 15-minute drive from Walkabout Creek. Picnic shelters and wood barbecues are nestled among tall eucalypt trees. On a clear day enjoy amazing views of Moreton Bay and the Glass House Mountains from the lower north-facing lookout. Walk along the ridgeline to another lookout offering surprisingly close views of bustling Brisbane city, only 35 minutes away by car. This second lookout has been named Bathersby Lookout in honour of retired Archbishop John Bathersby of the Catholic Achdiocese of Brisbane, in recognition for his 20 years service to the Brisbane community.

Jollys Lookout

Named after Brisbane’s first Lord Mayor, William Jolly, this lookout offers expansive views of Moreton Island, Brisbane Valley and the Glass House Mountains. The Mayor was so taken with the view that he agreed to build a road to the lookout for better access.

Enjoy a picnic or wood barbecue at the picnic area, which is on Mount Nebo Road, 20-minutes drive from Walkabout Creek. Water at Jollys Lookout must be treated before drinking.

Boombana

Boombana means 'trees in bloom', which fits this area perfectly. During summer the lacebark tree Brachychiton discolor loses all its leaves but keeps its large pink flowers, creating a burst of colour through the greenery. Enjoy a barbecue lunch or take a walk through the forest. Boombana is located just before Mount Nebo township, about 20-minutes drive from Walkabout Creek. There are toilets, picnic tables, wood barbecues and water (treat before drinking).

Westridge outlook

See views over Lake Wivenhoe with the Great Dividing Range in the distance. A mixed forest of grey gums, tallowwoods and spotted gums surrounds the lookout, which is situated on a high rocky outcrop. Try to spot animal markings from goannas, possums and red triangle slugs on the smooth-barked eucalyptus trees. The lookout is off Mount Glorious Road, 35-minutes drive from Walkabout Creek.

Maiala

This special area was the first national park declared on the D’Aguilar Range. Originally cleared for a timber mill, Maiala is now a spacious and peaceful place to visit. Some machinery and remnant hoop pine plantation remain as evidence of Maiala’s loud and laborious past. Enjoy a picnic, barbecue or rainforest walk. There are toilets, picnic tables, wood barbecues and water (treat before drinking). This area is located just past the Mount Glorious township, about 45-minutes drive from Walkabout Creek.

Wivenhoe outlook

This outlook provides a picnic area with scenic views of Lake Wivenhoe. Stringybark trees flower here during summer with pale yellow flowers that attract birds. The unusual cry of the cat bird can often be heard in the valley below. Viewing platforms are only a short walk from parking, toilets and picnic facilities. Tap water at Wivenhoe outlook must be treated before drinking. This area is located on Northbrook Pathway, 50-minutes drive from Walkabout Creek.

Red and White Cedar

This area is on the Northbrook Parkway, about a one-hour drive from Walkabout Creek, as you travel between the park and Lake Wivenhoe. With open, grassy areas and a picturesque stream running behind the day-use area, this is a great place to stop and enjoy the quiet scenery. There are toilets, picnic tables, wood barbecues and water (treat before drinking).

Attractions in Mount Mee section

The Gantry

The Gantry is 150 m from the entrance to this section of the park, off Sellin Road. It is the most accessible day-use area in Mount Mee as the entry road is sealed and can accommodate two-wheel-drive vehicles. The Gantry shelter is a legacy of the sawmill that operated here until 1981. Enjoy a picnic or barbecue at the grassy picnic area. There are two walks that start and finish opposite the picnic area. Wheelchair and parking facilities are provided. Water at The Gantry must be treated before drinking.

Falls lookout and Bulls Falls

Falls lookout can be reached by a formed, unsealed gravel road from Neurum Creek Road. An easy 400 m walk leads down to a viewing platform overlooking the northern side of the D’Aguilar Range and picturesque Neurum Valley. Walk a further 80 m to Bulls Falls, offering beautiful views of sheltered rainforest pools and rocky crags.

Rocky Hole

Surrounded by dry, open eucalypt forest this spot features a rock pool and is popular during summer. The walk to Rocky Hole is only 200 m return and has steps in steeper sections. The car park is on Neurum Creek Road, 8 km (25 mins) from The Gantry day-use area. For your safety do not jump or dive into the water hole.

Broadwater

Broadwater is a popular spot during the hot summer months. Enjoy a picnic at this small day-use area adjacent to a large waterhole. Parking, toilets and picnic tables are provided. For your safety do not jump or dive into the water hole.

Access to Broadwater is recommended for four-wheel-drive vehicles only.

Walking

D'Aguilar National Park offers a range of walking tracks for beginner and experienced walkers. Each track is classified according to Australian Standards and only suitable for pedestrian use. Please note that while each track is classified according to its most difficult section, other sections may be easier.

Walkers can also access a number of forest trails throughout the range. These trails may be shared by horse and mountain-bike riders, four-wheel drivers and/or motorcyclists—please see driving and trail-bike riding and horse and mountain-bike riding for more information.

Before walking in the park read the guidelines on walking safely and walking softly to ensure a safe, enjoyable and sustainable experience.

Key to track standards

Class 2 walking track Class 2 (Australian Standards)

  • Easy, level, well-graded track, suitable for all fitness levels.

Class 3 walking track Class 3 (Australian Standards)

  • Gently-sloping, well-defined track with slight inclines or few steps.
  • Caution needed on loose gravel surfaces and exposed natural lookouts.
  • Reasonable level of fitness and ankle-supporting footwear required.

Class 4 walking track Class 4 (Australian Standards)

  • Distinct track usually with steep exposed inclines or many steps.
  • Caution needed on loose gravel surfaces and exposed natural outlooks.
  • Moderate level of fitness and ankle-supporting footwear required.

Walking in south D'Aguilar section

To obtain information and maps for walking in Mount Coot-tha Forest, please visit the Brisbane City Council website.

Short walks (less than 2 hrs)
Access point Track name Track class Distance/time Description
From Walkabout Creek Corymbia circuit

Class 3 walking track

Class 3

1.5 km return; allow 45 mins Beginning at the visitor centre, this track winds down through a wet eucalypt forest gully and climbs back to the visitor centre. The track is quite steep in places.
From Bellbird Grove Turrbal circuit

Class 3 walking track

Class 3

1.7 km circuit; allow 40–50 mins This circuit winds through open eucalypt forest, down into a wet eucalypt gully and back to the day-use area. Cone-shaped holes, dug by the nocturnal northern brown bandicoot, are often seen beside the track.
From Bellbird Grove Golden Boulder track

Class 3 walking track

Class 3

1.8 km circuit; allow 40–50 mins Follow in the footsteps of the miners who once worked along the exposed ridges and deep in the mine shafts. Signs along the walking track tell of the area’s gold mining history. It is quite steep in places, so supervise children at all times.
From Jollys Lookout Egernia circuit

Class 3 walking track

Class 3

1.5 km circuit; allow 45 mins From the road at the base of Jollys Lookout, this track loops through open eucalypt forest and back to the road. Parking is available at the lookout and at the walking track entrance below it. Early morning walkers may be rewarded with a host of different birdcalls to listen to.
From Boombana Pitta circuit

Class 3 walking track

Class 3

1 km circuit; allow 20–30 mins Beginning at the day-use area, this track explores open eucalypt forest and then subtropical rainforest. See a huge 300-year-old strangler fig, slender palms, climbing ferns and vines, orchids and other epiphytes. Mount Nebo village can be accessed from this circuit via a 600 m track from the boardwalk.
From Manorina Atrax circuit

Class 3 walking track

Class 3

750 m return; allow 15–20 mins Walk through tall forest featuring cabbage tree palms. ALong the track, keen-eyed walkers may find tiny, earthen moss-covered earth doors of secretive trapdoor spiders.
From Maiala Rainforest circuit

Class 3 walking track

Class 3

2 km circuit; allow 1 hr This walking track starts at Maiala day-use area and winds through stunning subtropical rainforest. Appreciate the majestic beauty of the old Sydney blue gum, a sole survivor of the eucalypt forest that was once the dominant vegetation here. This track joins Cypress Grove and a section of Greenes Falls walking tracks. Parking is available at Maiala car park.
From Maiala Cypress Grove track

Class 3 walking track

Class 3

2.5 km return; allow 1 hr and 20 mins This is a short walk branching off the Rainforest circuit. Quiet walkers may see white-browed scrub wrens darting around the disturbed leaf litter, catching small insects.
From Maiala Western Window track

Class 4 walking track

Class 4

1.2 km return; allow 35–45 mins

This track starts from the top of Maiala day-use area (the south side of Mount Glorious Road) and runs along the escarpment to the Western Window—an expansive undulating view to the west. Visit the window at sunset for an awe-inspiring day’s end.

Longer walks (2–4 hrs)
Access point Track name Track class Distance/time Description
From Walkabout Creek Araucaria track

Class 3 walking track

Class 3

5 km return; allow 2 hrs This walking track begins at the visitor centre and winds past giant hoop pines along the shores of Enoggera Reservoir, before looping back around one of the reservoir's peninsulas. There are excellent opportunities for birdwatching, especially early in the morning.
From Jollys Lookout Thylogale walking track

Class 3 walking track

Class 3

8 km return; allow 2–3 hrs This walking track connects Jollys Lookout to Boombana. Walk through pockets of dry rainforest—a vegetation type well known for its diversity and abundance of twisting vines. During spring, look on the forest floor for the dainty purple and white pea-like flowers that fall off the native wisteria vine.
From Manorina Morelia walking track

Class 4 walking track

Class 4

6 km return; allow 2 hrs This track takes walkers from the Manorina car park to Mount Nebo lookout. Trek through wet eucalypt forest containing groves of cabbage tree palms, recognised by their huge, fan-shaped leaves. At Mount Nebo lookout, enjoy spectacular views over Samford Valley and Moreton Bay. Morelia walking track is mostly a gently-sloping, well-defined track but it is quite steep in some places. Return along the same track.
From Maiala Greenes Falls track

Class 3 walking track

Class 3

4.3 km return; allow 2 hrs The Greenes Falls track passes over rainforest pools and ends at a lookout above Greenes Falls. This track is an extra 1 km walk branching off the Rainforest circuit. Be prepared for an uphill walk on the return trip. Parking is available at Maiala car park.
From Maiala Westside track

Class 4 walking track

Class 4

6.4 km return; allow 2–3 hrs Enjoy a cool, scenic walk through subtropical rainforest. This track branches off the Western Window track. Access is from the top of the Maiala day-use area (the southern side of Mount Glorious Road). From Maiala day-use area walk 600 m to the Western Window, before walking down to a level track perched on the side of a steep slope that finishes at Lawton Road. Parking is available at Maiala car park. The Westside track can also be accessed from Lawton Road and Joyners Ridge Road.

The following longer walks are suggested loops along management roads. They can be completed in one long day, or walkers can camp overnight at one of the secluded, back country bush camps. Keep a look out for small road signs to orientate yourself as you walk through the park and take a D’Aguilar National Park (South D’Aguilar section) topographic map with you. These maps can be purchased from the Walkabout Creek Visitor Centre.

Longer walks (4–10 hrs)
Access point Track name Track class Distance/time Description
From Maiala Aquila loop

Class 4 walking track

Class 4

24 km; allow 6–10 hrs

This walk begins at the Maiala day-use area and follows the Westside track past Western Window and down the steep stairs to a track junction. Walkers then follow a couple of management roads to England Creek (left branch) and England Creek bush camp. From this bush camp, the walk continues along England Creek Road to the top of Northbrook Mountain and Northbrook Mountain bush camp. Enjoy spectacular views of the England Creek catchment nearing the top of Northbrook Mountain. From Northbrook Mountain bush camp, the walk continues to the intersection of Lawton and England Creek roads and then follows Lawton Road down to a saddle and up again before reaching the Westside track entry sign. The Westside track leads back to the Maiala day-use area.

This loop can be completed in either direction. More detailed instructions for this walk are provided on the topographic map which can be purchased from the Walkabout Creek Visitor Centre.

From Mount Nebo transfer station Cabbage Tree Range loop

Class 4 walking track

Class 4

17 km; allow 4–7 hrs

This loop begins at the Mount Nebo transfer station, about 1.5 km north-west of Manorina. It follows Dundas Road to the Dundas Road bush camp then heaps along Cabbage Tree Range Road to Cabbage Tree Creek. After carefully crossing the creek, walkers head up Job 6 Break to Light Line Road and along the road to Light Line Road bush camp. Past the bush camp, the walk continues along Light Line Road, turns left down Double Break and proceeds around the gate onto Hammermeister Road, then Mount Nebo Road and back to the transfer station.

Please leave room for rangers to drive through the gate if parking at the transfer station. More detailed instructions for this walk are provided on the topographic map which can be purchased from the Walkabout Creek Visitor Centre.

From Bullockys Dam Augies loop

Class 4 walking track

Class 4

16 km; allow 4–7 hrs

Augies loop begins at Bullockys Dam, on South Boundary Road. From the dam, the walk follows South Boundary Road to Augies Road and along Augies Road to the intersection of Creek Road and then descends along Creek Road to the creek. After carefully crossing the creek, walkers head uphill to Gold Creek Boundary Break, along this break to South Boundary Road and then onto the Scrub Road bush camp. The walk continues along South Boundary Road, passes Augies Road and heads back to Bullockys Dam.

Parking is available at the dam—please leave room for rangers to drive through the gate. More detailed instructions for this walk are provided on the topographic mapwhich can be purchased from the Walkabout Creek Visitor Centre.

Walking in Mount Mee section

Short walks (less than 2 hrs)
Access point Track name Track class Distance/time Description
From The Gantry Piccabeen walk

Class 2 walking track

Class 2

1 km; allow 20–30 mins

This short walk begins opposite The Gantry and follows a boardwalk and track through a grove of piccabeen palms. Signs provide information about the different forest types and timber-getting history of the area.

From Falls lookout and Bulls Falls Falls lookout track

Class 2 walking track

Class 2

1 km return; allow 20–30 mins Falls lookout can be reached by a gravel road from Neurum Creek Road and has a short walk down to a viewing platform overlooking the northern side of D’Aguilar Range and picturesque Neurum Valley.
From Neurum Creek Road between The Gantry adn Neurum Creek camping area Mill rainforest walk

Class 3 walking track

Class 3

1.4 km circuit; allow 40–50 mins

This walking track winds through subtropical rainforest and provides opportunities for birdwatching, so bring binoculars. The track entrance is accessed via a short unsealed, formed gravel road off Neurum Creek Road.

From Neurum Creek camping area Lophostemon walk

Class 3 walking track

Class 3

750 m circuit; allow 20 mins This circuit begins at the northern end of Neurum Creek camping area. Take a leisurely stroll through tall, open eucalypt forest with a rainforest understory.
Longer walks (2–4 hrs)
Access point Track name Track class Distance/time Description
From The Gantry Somerset trail

Class 4 walking track

Class 4

13 km; allow 4 hrs Beginning opposite The Gantry, this track passes through scribbly gum forests, rainforest and dry open forest. About halfway along enjoy views to the west overlooking Somerset Dam and Lake Wivenhoe. Parking is available at The Gantry car park. Bring water as there is no drinking water available along the trail.

Horse and mountain-bike riding

A leisurely ride through the park on horseback or bicycle is a great way to experience the wonders of the bush. There is a network of forest trails throughout the park for horse and mountain-bike riding. A special permit is not required unless it is a commercial activity, or an organised group activity and/or competitive event.

Horse and mountain-bike riding is fun provided you stay safe.

Mountain-bike riding

Mountain-bike riding is permitted on forest trails in the South D’Aguilar section of D’Aguilar National Park, unless otherwise signed. See the South D’Aguilar forest trail map (PDF, 624K)* for more details.

A high level of fitness and sound navigational skills are required to ride in D’Aguilar National Park. You will need to carry a D’Aguilar National Park (South D'Aguilar section topographic map (which can be purchased from the Walkabout Creek Visitor Centre) if you are a new rider to the area as there are hundreds of kilometres of trails.

Designated mountain-bike and other shared forest trails can also be found in Bunyaville Conservation Park and Daisy Hill Conservation Park. Sections of Mount Coot-tha Forest, managed by Brisbane City Council, also have mountain-bike and multiple-use trails. A mountain-bike trail map is available for Mount Coot-tha Forest on the Brisbane City Council website.

Popular mountain-bike trails
Trail name Description
South Boundary Road trail This trail follows a long, forested ridge approximately 22 km (one way) to the cool rainforest township of Mount Nebo. The trail has several lengthy climbs (heading up the mountain and on the return run) and is enjoyed more in the cooler months of the year. This is a shared forest trail—horseriders and walkers also use this area.
Audax loop Ride through subtropical rainforest and eucalypt forest on this spectacular mountainous trail through the D’Aguilar Range. The loop is approximately 25 km, winding up Joyners Ridge and along Lawton Road before descending from the top of Northbrook Mountain down England Creek Road. The trail begins by winding down Joyners Ridge Road onto England Creek Road. From England Ceek bush camp the trail climbs to the top of Northbrook Mountain before descending down Lawton Road back to Mount Glorious Road. This circuit ride requires a high level of fitness and good navigation skills—you need to be conditioned for long, arduous hill climbs. Control your speed on the descents at all times, especially near steep edges. This ride is best enjoyed during cool weather.

Horseriding

Horseriding is permitted on specified forest trails in D’Aguilar National Park. See the South D’Aguilar forest trail map (PDF, 624K)* and Mount Mee forest trail and drive map (PDF, 208K)* for more details. For more information about horseriding in South East Queensland’s protected areas, visit the SEQ horseriding trail network page.

To help reduce your impact on our natural areas:

  • do not allow horses to remain in the park overnight
  • ride only on formed roads and trails designated for riding. Do not take shortcuts or form new tracks as this damages the environment and causes erosion
  • do not allow horses to enter or remain in or near natural watercourses. Only allow horses to cross natural watercourses at designated crossing points on the trail for the protection of watercourses in the area
  • minimise damage to vegetation. Do not allow horses to graze on any vegetation while in the area
  • tether horses at hitching posts or resting areas only for short periods to minimise soil erosion and compaction
  • avoid spreading weeds—ensure horses’ coats, hooves and equipment are free of seeds before park visits.

Guided tours and talks

The Connect with Nature program offers a range of nature-based activities and events every season for adults, children and families in and around parks and forests throughout Brisbane, Western Scenic Rim and Gold Coast and hinterland.

The Connect with Nature schools program features environmental education activities run in D'Aguilar National Park. The program is designed to suit the school curriculum and gives students the opportunity to experience Queensland's natural environment and cultural heritage through ranger-guided activities.

Things to know before you go

Be prepared for your visit to ensure you have a safe and enjoyable time.

Essentials to bring

  • Bring your own drinking water. Drinking water is only available at Walkabout Creek. All other water obtained in the park must be treated before drinking.
  • Please bring rubbish bags with you and ensure all rubbish is removed from the park. There are no rubbish bins provided in the park.
  • Sensible footwear—boots or sturdy shoes—to wear when bushwalking.

Opening hours

The park is open 24 hours a day. For your safety, walk and ride during daylight hours only.

The Walkabout Creek Visitor Centre and the South East Queensland Wildlife Centre are open daily from 9.00 am to 4.30 pm (closed on some public holidays).

Permits and fees

Camping permits

Camping permits must be obtained prior to camping in the park and fees apply. A camping tag with your booking number must be displayed at your camp site.

Other permits

A special permit is not required for recreational activities in D’Aguilar National Park, unless they are commercial activities, or organised group activities and/or competitive events. This includes commercial photography—if you wish to sell photographs you’ve taken on park or use your photographs in a product which will later be sold, such as a book or postcard, you must obtain a permit and pay a fee. 

Bookings are essential for large groups wishing to use picnic and day-use areas. Weddings are popular at Red Ash day-use area at Bellbird Grove, as well as at Lomandra, Wivenhoe outlook and Camp Mountain day-use areas. To book an area for your event or function, contact Permits and Licence Management. Please note that Red Ash day-use area is the only area that may be booked for exclusive use.

Pets

Domestic animals (other than horses on permitted forest trails) are not permitted anywhere in D’Aguilar National Park.

Climate and weather

The mountain tops and forest flats of the D'Aguilar Range may experience cooler temperatures and more rainfall than Brisbane city—which enjoys a mild, subtropical climate. The average daily temperature range in Brisbane city is 22–30 °C in summer and 12–22 °C in winter.

Fuel and supplies

Fuel and supplies are available at The Gap and throughout Brisbane, or from Dayboro and D’Aguilar townships in Brisbane’s northern suburbs.

Staying safe

Expect the best, but prepare for the worst—you are responsible for your own safety.

  • Treat water obtained from all sources in the park, including taps, creeks and lakes. For more information watch the ‘treat all drinking water’ web clip.
  • Supervise children at all times.
  • Obey all safety and warning signs.
  • Never dive or jump into water as it may be shallow or have submerged hazards.
  • Be aware that mobile phone reception can be unreliable in this area. In an emergency phone Triple Zero (000). If you have difficulty connecting to Triple Zero (000) from your mobile phone, try dialling 112.
  • Reduce theft by removing valuables from your vehicle and taking them with you.
  • Take care during wet weather. Tracks can be slippery, especially after rain.
  • Stay away from cliff edges.
  • Carry adequate drinking water, a first-aid kit and insect repellent.
  • Use sun protection—wear sunscreen, a hat and long-sleeved shirt, even on cloudy days. Start longer walks at cooler times of the day to avoid heat exhaustion in summer.
  • Never walk alone. Tell friends or family where you are going and when you expect to return. If you change your plans inform them.
  • Plan to complete walks and rides well before dark.
  • Walk safely.

Horse and mountain-bike riding safety

  • Always wear a helmet.
  • Plan ahead, ride within your ability and according to track conditions.
  • Avoid skidding and sliding around turns—collisions and injury may result.
  • Avoid riding in large groups.
  • Slow down and consider other track users.
  • Follow the give-way code—cyclists give way to horses and walkers; walkers give way to horses. Cyclists should alert others when approaching them.
  • Cyclists riding downhill must give way to cyclists riding uphill.
  • Avoid riding on soft, wet and muddy tracks.
  • Respect areas closed to riding.
  • Ride only on formed roads and trails designated for riding. Do not take shortcuts or form new tracks as this damages the environment and causes erosion.
  • Be aware that mobile phone reception can be unreliable in this area.

Bushfire safety

In conditions of high fire danger, walking tracks and other areas may be closed.

For you safety, follow instructions on signs. If you see a bushfire or any illegal activity, please phone emergency services as soon as possible.

For more information, please read the guidelines on safety in parks and forests.

Looking after the park

Help care for the park and its inhabitants—large and small. Photo: Bernard Hicks, NPRSR.

Help care for the park and its inhabitants—large and small. Photo: Bernard Hicks, NPRSR.

Help to care for the D’Aguilar Range and the wildlife that lives here by following these guidelines.

General

  • Everything in national parks and forests is protected. Do not take or interfere with plants or animals.
  • Do not collect firewood. Fallen timber provides homes for many insects and small animals.
  • Let native animals find their own food. Human food can make native animals susceptible to disease and can cause overpopulations and aggressive behaviour.
  • Leave pets at home. Domestic animals are not permitted in the national park.
  • Stay on designated tracks and trails. Shortcutting causes erosion, damages vegetation and can potentially result in injury.
  • Remove all rubbish. No bins are provided in the park. For more information watch the ‘reduce and recycle’ web clip.
  • Show consideration for other park users and wildlife by keeping noise to a minimum.

Horse and mountain-bike riding

  • Avoid riding in large groups.
  • Avoid riding on soft, wet and muddy tracks.
  • Respect areas closed to riding.
  • Ride only on formed roads, tracks and trails designated for riding. Do not take shortcuts or form new tracks as this damages the environment and causes erosion.

Remote camping

Where no toilets are provided, take care with sanitation and hygiene and do not pollute the natural water supplies. For more information watch the 'bush toileting and washing' web clip.

  • Bury all faecal waste and toilet paper in holes 15 cm deep and at least 100 m from water, camps and tracks. Make sure you carry a small trowel or spade for this purpose.
  • Consider using a human waste disposal kit to take your waste out with you. Kits are available from some camping stores. Please follow manufacturer’s directions on the packet and dispose of waste responsibly.
  • Wash away from streams, gullies and watercourses, as all detergents, soaps, sunscreens, insect repellents and toothpastes pollute water and damage aquatic life.

See the guidelines on caring for parks for more information about protecting our environment and heritage in parks.

Park management

The Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service (QPWS) of the Department of National Parks, Recreation, Sport and Racing (NPRSR) manages D'Aguilar National Park under the Nature Conservation Act 1992 to preserve and present its remarkable natural and cultural values in perpetuity.

The park is managed in accordance with the D’Aguilar National Park management plan (PDF, file unavailable)*.

Tourism information links

Brisbane Visitor Information and Booking Centre
www.visitbrisbane.com.au
Queens Street Mall, Brisbane City QLD 4000
Phone: (07) 3006 6290
Email: visit@brisbanemarketing.com.au 

For tourism information for all regions in Queensland see the Queensland Holidays website.

Further information

Contact us

Walkabout Creek Visitor Centre
60 Mount Nebo Road
The Gap Qld 4061
Phone: (07) 3512 2300

Brisbane City Council (for information about Mount Coot-tha Forest)
www.brisbane.qld.gov.au 
Phone: (07) 3403 8888

To access Lake Wivenhoe, phone SEQ Water on (07) 5427 8100; to access Somerset Dam phone (07) 5426 0188.

* Requires Adobe Reader

Last updated
20 December 2013