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About Daisy Hill

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Getting there and getting around

Come face-to-face with koalas at the Daisy Hill Koala Centre. Photo: Anna Osetroff, Queensland Government.

Come face-to-face with koalas at the Daisy Hill Koala Centre. Photo: Anna Osetroff, Queensland Government.

Daisy Hill Regional Park is easily accessed from Brisbane or the Gold Coast via the Pacific Motorway (M1). From the Gold Coast, travel north along the Pacific Motorway and take exit 24. Travelling south from Brisbane along Pacific Motorway, take exit 24 and follow the signs to Daisy Hill Road and the entrance to the park. The two large day-use areas are accessible with conventional vehicles.

There are also a number of gates around the park boundary that can be accessed by walkers, mountain-bike riders and horseriders.

Wheelchair accessibility

Car park one in the lower day-use area has parking for people with wheelchairs, and wheelchair access to picnic tables, barbecues and toilets. The Daisy Hill Koala Centre is wheelchair accessible.

Car park three in the lower day-use area has parking for people with wheelchairs and wheelchair access to undercover seating, barbecues and toilets.

The Paperbark trail is a walking trail suitable for wheelchairs with some assistance. It starts in the lower day-use area, accessible from car park three.

Park features

Take the family for a cycle along the shared trails in the park. Photo: Anna Osetroff, Queensland Government .

Take the family for a cycle along the shared trails in the park. Photo: Anna Osetroff, Queensland Government .

Daisy Hill Regional Park features eucalypt forest and paperbark wetlands. Two large day-use areas provide picnic and barbecue facilities with two undercover seating areas. Signposted walking tracks begin at various points along the edge of the picnic areas and there are opportunities for mountain-bike riding and horseriding on the park’s shared trail network.

Daisy Hill Regional Park is an important part of one of Australia’s most significant regional koala populations. Daisy Hill Koala Centre offers the opportunity to see koalas up close and learn about protecting these unique animals and their habitat. Interactive displays are a feature of the centre.

The surrounding forest is home to a population of koalas, providing great opportunities for spotting koalas in the trees throughout the day-use areas and along walking tracks.

Camping and accommodation

Camping

To protect the natural values of Daisy Hill Regional Park, camping is not permitted.

Other accommodation

There is a range of holiday accommodation available in and around Brisbane and the Gold Coast. For more information see the tourism information links.

Things to do

Stroll along the Tree discovery trail and learn about the different forest trees. Photo: Adam Creed, Queensland Government.

Stroll along the Tree discovery trail and learn about the different forest trees. Photo: Adam Creed, Queensland Government.

Ride along one of the designated mountain-bike or shared trails. Photo: Queensland Government.

Ride along one of the designated mountain-bike or shared trails. Photo: Queensland Government.

Enjoy horseriding along any of the shared trails. Photo: Monique Shepherd, Queensland Government.

Enjoy horseriding along any of the shared trails. Photo: Monique Shepherd, Queensland Government.

Walking

Daisy Hill Regional Park offers the chance to explore tall eucalypt forests, melaleuca wetlands and the billabongs along Buhot Creek.

There are two designated walking trails in the park. Walking is also permitted on all management roads and shared trails in Daisy Hill Regional Park and Koala Bushland Coordinated Conservation Area (KBCCA) council reserves unless otherwise signed.

Visitors can enjoy bushwalking with their dogs on shared trails only. Dogs must be kept on a leash at all times.

Key to walking trail standards

The classification system is based on Australian Standards. Please note that while each trail is classified according to its most difficult section, other sections may be easier.

 Class 1

  • Flat, well formed track, no steps, 5 km or less.
  • Clearly signposted.
  • Suitable for wheelchairs with assistance.

 Class 2

  • Formed track. May have gentle hills and some steps.
  • Clearly signposted.
  • No experience required.

 Class 3

  • Formed track, some obstacles, 20 km or less.
  • May have short steep hills and many steps.
  • Some experience recommended.

 Class 4

  • Distinct track usually with steep exposed inclines or many steps, loose gravel surfaces and exposed natural outlooks.
  • Moderate level of fitness and bushwalking experience recommended.

Walking trails (mountain-bikes and horses prohibited)

Trails are designed to be walked clockwise.

Trail Classification Distance Time Description
Paperbark trail

 Class 1

450 m Allow 15 min Suitable for wheelchairs with some assistance, this well-graded trail and boardwalk starts near car park three in the lower day-use area. It winds through melaleuca wetlands fed by a natural spring. Read the interpretive signs to find out more about this wetland area.
Tree discovery trail

 Class 2

800 m Allow 30 min Identify and learn about different forest trees on this self-guided trail that starts near car park four in the lower day-use area.

See the shared trails table below for other walking options.

Mountain-bike riding and horseriding

Mountain-bike riding and horseriding are permitted on all management roads and shared trails in Daisy Hill Regional Park and KBCCA council reserves unless otherwise signed. Designated mountain-bike trails are also located in these areas. Each trail entry has a sign indicating which recreational activities are permitted.

Permits are not required for horseriding or mountain-bike riding in Daisy Hill Regional Park.

Mountain-bike and horseriding trail classifications

Mountain-bike trail classification descriptions
Easy

Wide trail, gentle gradient, some obstacles. For beginner mountain bikers with basic mountain-bike skills.

Intermediate

Moderate gradient, obstacles and some steep sections. For skilled mountain bikers.

Difficult

For experienced mountain bikers. Challenging trail. Large, unavoidable obstacles and features. Long steep climbs or descents and loose surfaces.

Horseriding trail classification descriptions
Class 1 Easy

Wide trail, natural, surface, gentle slope. For novice riders and experienced horses with basic skills and fitness.

Class 2 Intermediate

Variable trail, moderate slope, some obstacles. For experienced riders and horses with moderate skills and fitness.

Mountain-bike trails (horses and walkers prohibited)

Trail Classification Distance Time Description

Track 1
Possum Box

 Intermediate 3.95 km one way Allow 15 to 20 min Best ridden from the five ways but can be ridden in both directions.
Track 2
Tunnel of Love

  Intermediate

530 m one way Allow 5 to 10 min

Can be ridden both directions but is a downhill run from the five ways. There is a challenging rock garden a few 100 m in from the top of the trail.

 Track 3   Intermediate  1.4 km one way Allow 10 to 15 min Can be ridden both directions.
 Track 9   Intermediate  565 m one way Allow 5 min A short single track link from the southern boundary.

Shared trails in the KBCCA (walkers, horseriders and mountain-bike riders permitted)

Trail Classification  Distance Time Description
Buhot Creek circuit

 Class 3

 Intermediate

 Intermediate

9 km return Allow 5.5 hr to walk or 2 hr to ride This trail starts from the upper day-use area and allows visitors to explore Daisy Hill Regional Park and adjoining Neville Lawrie Reserve. Take time by tranquil waterholes and enjoy views from the old quarry.

Plunkett mallee circuit

 Class 2

 Easy

 Easy

1.2 km return Allow 30 min to walk or 15 min to ride This circuit features a stand of Plunkett mallee Eucalyptus curtisii, a near threatened tree within the Redland City Council area that flowers prolifically from September to November.

Spotted gum trail

 Class 3

 Intermediate

 Intermediate

4 km return Allow 2.5 hr to walk or 50 min to ride Branching off the Buhot Creek circuit, this trail follows a gently undulating ridgeline through eucalypt forest dominated by spotted gums.

Stringybark trail

 Class 3

 Intermediate

 Intermediate

5.7 km return Allow 3.5 hr to walk or 1 hr to ride This trail starts from the upper day-use area and meanders through the various plant communities with Buhot Creek catchment. Red-necked wallabies, swamp wallabies and various birds may be seen along the way.

Track 4

Gillians and Ripleys trail

 Class 3

 Intermediate

 Intermediate

2.4 km one way Allow 10 to 20 min to ride This trail climbs to an elevated ridge with numerous downhill opportunities. Gillians trail (320 m one way) joins Ripleys trail for a longer ride.

Track 5

Koala trail

 Class 3

 Intermediate

 Intermediate

870 m one way Allow 5 to 10 min to ride This trail is an extension of track 2. It changes name on the boundary of Daisy Hill Regional Park and Neville Lawrie Reserve; from track 2 to Koala trail (track 5).

Track 6

Stonehenge trail

 Class 3

 Intermediate

 Intermediate

1.9 km one way Allow 5 to 10 min to walk Best ridden from North to South to make the most of the downhill run.

Track 7

Grasstree trail

 Class 3

 Intermediate

 Intermediate

1.3 km one way Allow 10 to 20 min to walk Coming from Daisy Hill this track is best ridden as a link to gain access to the top of Stonehenge trail (track 6) and Ford Road Conservation Area.

Shared trails in the KBCCA (walkers and mountain-bike riders only)

Trail

Classification

Distance

Time

Description 

Track 8
Nirvana trail

 Class 4

 Difficult

1.9 km one way

Allow 25 min to walk

To get the best of this trail ride from East to West starting from Leo Lindo Drive.

Ride safely

  • Always wear a helmet.
  • Plan ahead, ride within your ability and according to trail conditions.
  • Slow down or stop when approaching other trail users. Follow the give-way code.
  • Avoid riding in large groups—keep groups to fewer than 12.
  • Avoid skidding and sliding around turns—this may result in collision with other trail users and injury.
  • Avoid riding during and after rain when tracks are soft, wet and muddy.
  • Stay on marked trails—riding over vegetation, taking shortcuts and forming new trails damages plants and wildlife habitat.
  • Respect areas closed to riding.
Follow the give-way code
Give way sign
  • Cyclists must give way to walkers and horseriders, and alert others when approaching them.
  • Walkers must give way to horses.

Picnic and day-use areas

Lower and upper day-use areas

Picnics or barbecues can be enjoyed under the gum trees in one of the two large day-use areas.

The lower day-use area is set in grassy open forest and can be accessed via a sealed ring road. There is parking for cars and buses. Picnic tables, wood barbecues, toilets, two shelter sheds and water (treat before drinking) are provided and there is suitable access for wheelchairs and strollers.

The upper day-use area is smaller and popular with horseriders. It can be accessed by turning right before the main gates. Picnic tables, wood barbecues, toilets, a horse yard and drinking trough are provided. The large bitumen car park can accommodate parking for 30 cars and has two designated horse-trailer sites.

No bins are provided at Daisy Hill Regional Park so please take your rubbish home.

Shelter shed reservations

The large shelter shed near car park four in the lower day-use area can be reserved for exclusive use. Bookings are essential and fees apply. For further information about the shelter shed and how to make a reservation see venues for hire.

Daisy Hill Koala Centre

At the Daisy Hill Koala Centre there are live koalas and it is possible to talk to rangers and volunteers about this furry Australian icon. The centre is a great place to find out interesting facts about koala's habitat, diet and life cycle, and learn what to do to help protect them. The treetop tower lets visitors look for wild koalas in the surrounding forest.

Viewing wildlife

The eucalypt forest of Daisy Hill Regional Park is dominated by spotted gum, grey gum, ironbark, tallowwood and stringybark trees. It provides a habitat for a wide range of wildlife including koalas, possums, wallabies, birds and reptiles.

Throughout the day-use areas and along walking tracks visitors may spot a sleeping koala in the treetops.

While enjoying a picnic, pied butcherbirds, pied currawongs, Australian magpies, sulphur-crested cockatoos and laughing kookaburras can be seen and the distinctive 'whip' call of the eastern whipbird is often heard.

During the warmer months (October to March) the loud 'cooee' of the common koel and the raucous call of the channel-billed cuckoo echo through the forest.

Fantails and fairy-wrens are common along the walking trails and sacred kingfishers and eastern water dragons occur near creeks and waterholes. Late in the afternoons, red-necked wallabies and swamp wallabies can be seen in the day-use areas.

See the description of the park’s natural environment for more details about Daisy Hill Regional Park's local koala population.

Things to know before you go

Pack zip-lock bags so you can take your rubbish home. Photo: Adam Creed, Queensland Government.

Pack zip-lock bags so you can take your rubbish home. Photo: Adam Creed, Queensland Government.

Keep dogs on a leash at all times and walk them only on shared trails. Photo: Anna Osetroff, Queensland Government.

Keep dogs on a leash at all times and walk them only on shared trails. Photo: Anna Osetroff, Queensland Government.

Essentials to bring

  • Rubbish bags to take rubbish home—no bins are provided.
  • Protective clothing, a hat, sunscreen and insect repellent, for protection from the sun and biting insects.
  • Sturdy shoes for walking or riding.
  • Binoculars to help spot koalas and other wildlife.

Opening hours

Daisy Hill Regional Park has entry and exit gates which are locked each evening.

Between 15 March and 14 October the gates are open from 7.00 am to 5.30 pm. For the rest of the year the gates are open from 7.00 am to 6.30 pm.

The Daisy Hill Koala Centre is open daily from 10.00 am to 4.00 pm. Contact the centre on public holidays to check if it is open.

Permits and fees

Grey Gum site, Forest Amphitheatre and Shelter Shed bookings

Bookings are essential and fees apply. You must complete an organised event notification form. See venues for hire for further information about booking any of these sites.

Pets

Dogs are permitted in Daisy Hill Regional Park but must be on a leash at all times.

Climate and weather

Brisbane has a mild, subtropical climate. In summer the average daily temperature range is 22 to 30 °C and 12 to 22 °C in winter.

For more information see the tourism information links. Weather forecasts are available from the Bureau of Meteorology.

Fuel and supplies

Fuel and supplies are available at Daisy Hill and throughout Brisbane.

Staying safe

Protect yourself and the park—stay on trails and follow signs. Photo: Anna Osetroff, Queensland Government.

Protect yourself and the park—stay on trails and follow signs. Photo: Anna Osetroff, Queensland Government.

  • Take care when using barbecues. Only use wood provided within the barbecue facilities and put the fire out with water. Supervise children to avoid burn injuries. Observe fire bans and prohibitions.
  • Stay on the trails and observe signs to avoid getting lost.
  • Carry water, food, a first-aid kit, mobile phone and a map when walking, especially on longer walks.
  • Always let a responsible person know where you are going and when you expect to return.
  • Wear a hat and sunscreen and avoid walking and riding in the middle of the day.
  • If you see a snake, leave it alone and keep clear.
  • Keep away from creek banks; they may collapse under foot.
  • Be aware that trails can be slippery, especially after rain.
  • Obey signs and regulations—they are in place to protect you and the park.
  • Reduce theft by removing valuables from your vehicle and taking them with you.

For more information, please read the guidelines on safety in parks and forests.

Looking after the park

Let animals find their own food. Photo: Anna Osetroff, Queensland Government.

Let animals find their own food. Photo: Anna Osetroff, Queensland Government.

You can help protect the park and forest by observing these guidelines:

  • Do not take or disturb plants or animals. Everything in the park is protected.
  • Stay on the designated trails. Shortcutting causes erosion, damages vegetation and can potentially result in injury.
  • Remove all rubbish. No bins are provided.
  • Dogs must be on leashes at all times and on designated trails.
  • Let animals find their own food. Human food can make native animals susceptible to disease, and can cause overpopulation and aggressive behaviour.
  • Show consideration for other park users and keep noise to a minimum.

See caring for parks for more information about protecting our environment and heritage in parks.

Park management

Photo: Courtesy Ross Naumann.

Photo: Courtesy Ross Naumann.

Daisy Hill Regional Park was gazetted as a conservation park in 2006. Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service (QPWS) manages this area for the purposes of nature conservation and nature-based recreation.

Daisy Hill Regional Park is part of Queensland’s first coordinated conservation area—the Koala Bushland Coordinated Conservation Area (KBCCA). The conservation area links Daisy Hill Regional Park, Venman Bushland National Park and local council areas (Neville Lawrie Reserve, Don and Christine Burnett Conservation Area and Ford Road Conservation Area) to provide a combined area of 1170 ha of natural bushland. This area protects one of the most intact natural koala habitats between Brisbane and the Gold Coast.

The Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service, Logan City Council and Redland City Council are working together to protect and cooperatively manage the KBCCA.

Tourism information links

Brisbane Visitor Information and Booking Centre
www.visitbrisbane.com.au
Queen Street Mall (between Albert and Edward streets), Brisbane Qld 4002
ph (07) 3006 6200
email visit@brisbanemarketing.com.au

Beenleigh Visitor Information Centre
www.logan.qld.gov.au
205 Main Street, Beenleigh Qld 4207
ph (07) 3287 1377
email beenleighinfo@logan.qld.gov.au

For tourism information for all regions in Queensland see Queensland Holidays.

Further information

Contact us

Daisy Hill Koala Centre
Daisy Hill Road, Daisy Hill
PO Box 5116, Daisy Hill Qld 4127
ph (07) 3299 1032
fax (07) 3299 1217
International +61 7 3299 1032 Fax +61 7 3299 1217
email: koala.centre@npsr.qld.gov.au

Open 10.00 am to 4.00 pm daily (except Christmas Day, New Year's Day and Good Friday).

Last updated
19 January 2016