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About Glass House Mountains

Getting there and getting around

A view of some of the Glass House Mountains, from the fire tower platform on Wild Horse Mountain (123m) in Beerburrum State Forest. Photo: NPRSR.

A view of some of the Glass House Mountains, from the fire tower platform on Wild Horse Mountain (123m) in Beerburrum State Forest. Photo: NPRSR.

From Brisbane, follow the Bruce Highway north, take the Glass House Mountains tourist drive turn-off and follow the signs to the Glass House Mountains.

The Glass House Mountains Visitor and Interpretive Centre is a great place to visit first for an orientation to the area. This accredited information centre is staffed by knowledgeable locals. It is located at Settler's Rotary Park, Reed Street, Glass House Mountains (open daily 9am to 5pm).

There are separate access routes to each of the recreation nodes around the mountain peaks—Mount Beerburrum (Glass House Mountains and surrounds map ref 3), Mount Beerwah (map ref 4), Mount Ngungun (map ref 5), Mount Tibrogargan (map ref 6).

Refer to the Glass House Mountains and surrounds map (PDF, 312K)* for access routes.

Wheelchair accessibility

The toilets and a picnic table at the base of Mount Tibrogargan are wheelchair accessible. Access surface is gravel and grass.

Park features

At 556 m above sea level, Mount Beerwah is the highest peak of the Glass House Mountains. Photo: NPRSR.

At 556 m above sea level, Mount Beerwah is the highest peak of the Glass House Mountains. Photo: NPRSR.

Craggy volcanic peaks tower over a scenic patchwork of pine plantations, bushland and cultivated fields. Many of the peaks are protected in Glass House Mountains National Park.

Named by Lieutenant James Cook during his epic voyage along Australia's east coast, the Glass House Mountains are intrusive plugs formed by volcanic activity millions of years ago.

Remnants of the open eucalypt woodland and heath vegetation provide a home for an interesting variety of animals and plants, including 26 plant species of conservation significance.

The Glass House Mountains area was a special meeting place where many Aboriginal people gathered for ceremonies and trading. This place is considered spiritually significant with many ceremonial sites still present and protected today.

Camping and accommodation

Camping

There are no camping areas within Glass House Mountains National Park.

Nearby Beerburrum State Forest has a camping area at Coochin Creek.

There are also private camping areas on the Glass House Mountains Road—see the tourism information links below for further information.

Other accommodation

A range of holiday accommodation is available in the Sunshine Coast hinterland. For more information see the tourism information links.

Things to do

Fig tree, Mount Beerburrum walking track. Rainforest and open forest feature on this walk. Photo: Ross Naumann, NPRSR volunteer.

Fig tree, Mount Beerburrum walking track. Rainforest and open forest feature on this walk. Photo: Ross Naumann, NPRSR volunteer.

Bloodwoods and other gums are common in the open forests. Photo: Ross Naumann, NPRSR volunteer.

Bloodwoods and other gums are common in the open forests. Photo: Ross Naumann, NPRSR volunteer.

View of Mount Coonowrin and Mount Beerwah from the summit of Mount Ngungun. Photo: Ross Naumann, NPRSR volunteer.

View of Mount Coonowrin and Mount Beerwah from the summit of Mount Ngungun. Photo: Ross Naumann, NPRSR volunteer.

Montane shrubland grows around the Mount Ngungun summit. Photo: Ross Naumann, NPRSR volunteer.

Montane shrubland grows around the Mount Ngungun summit. Photo: Ross Naumann, NPRSR volunteer.

Banksias and scribbly gums feature on the Mount Tibrogargan walking circuit. Photo: Ross Naumann, NPRSR volunteer.

Banksias and scribbly gums feature on the Mount Tibrogargan walking circuit. Photo: Ross Naumann, NPRSR volunteer.

Glass House Mountains National Park offers many opportunities for the visitor to explore and enjoy the natural surrounds:

Day-use areas

There are picnic tables and toilets beside the car park at Mount Tibrogargan and Mount Beerwah (a short 100m walk from the car park).

The toilets and a picnic table at the base of Mount Tibrogargan are wheelchair accessible. Access surface is gravel and grass.

Nearby in Beerburrum State Forest picnic tables, wheelchair-accessible toilets and gas barbecues are provided at Glass House Mountains lookout and Coochin Creek day-use area.

Walking tracks

A variety of walking tracks are provided here. Some are steep and require a high level of fitness.

Additional short walks with spectacular views over Glass House Mountains National Park are provided nearby in Beerburrum State Forest.

Walking tracks are classified using these standards:

 

 

Grade 3 track: Suitable for most ages and fitness levels. Some bushwalking experience required. Tracks may have short steep sections, a rough surface and many steps. Caution needed on loose gravel, muddy surfaces and exposed natural lookouts. Ankle-supporting footwear recommended.

 

Grade 4 track: Bushwalking experience recommended. Tracks may be long, rough and very steep. Caution needed on loose gravel surfaces and exposed natural lookouts. Moderate level of fitness and ankle-supporting footwear required.

Walking tracks at a glance:

 Mount Beerburrum walking track

Distance: 1.4km return
Time: Allow about 1hr

Details: Access is close to Beerburrum township. Travelling south on Beerburrum Road, the turnoff is about 500m on the right after the railway line overpass. Travelling north the turnoff is the first road on the left after the Beerburrum—Woodford Road junction. Look for directional signs. From the car park at the end of the road, a steep paved track leads you to a fire tower which offers great views. Mount Beerburrum's fire tower is used to detect and manage fires throughout the surrounding parks and forests. Mount Beerburrum is 280m above sea level.

 Mount Ngungun summit walking track

Distance: 2.8km return
Time: Allow about 2hrs

Details: Mount Ngungun is about 3km from Glass House Mountains township via Coonowrin and Fullertons Roads. The track begins in open forest with a fern understory. Part way up the mountain there is a great view of Mount Tibrogargan and the track passes a small rock overhang. The summit provides spectacular close-up views of nearby Mount Tibrogargan, Mount Coonowrin and Mount Beerwah. Caution: Track passes close to cliff edges—supervise children closely. Take extra care around the summit area in wet weather—rocks become very slippery. Walk carefully to avoid dislodging rocks—they might hit walkers or climbers below you.

 Mount Tibrogargan, Tibrogargan walking circuit

Distance: 800m to the Mountain View lookout; 3.3km for the complete circuit.

Time: Allow about 10mins to walk to the Mountain View lookout or 1hr 30mins to complete the circuit.

Details: Mount Tibrogargan is located between Beerburrum and Glass House Mountains townships, off Marshs and Barrs Roads. The walk begins from the northern end of the Mount Tibrogargan car park. A short walk leads up to the Mountain View lookout with views over Mount Beerwah, Mount Coonowrin, Mount Tibberoowuccum and Mount Tunbubudla. Keep following the walking track around the base of Mount Tibrogargan through casuarina groves, open eucalypt and melaleuca forests. The track provides some great views of Mount Tibrogargan. Peregrine falcons are often seen soaring above this area.

 Mount Tibrogargan, Trachyte walking circuit

Distance: 6km return
Time: Allow about 2-3hrs

Details: From the Mount Tibrogargan car park, this circuit leads through open woodland and heathland linking Mount Tibrogargan and Mount Tibberoowuccum. Interpretive signs along the track provide details of the area's special features. The Jack Ferris lookout, on Trachyte Ridge, allows for good views of the surrounding peaks. This ridge owes its name to a type of volcanic rock which forms many of the Glass House Mountains peaks.

Summit routes—rock scrambling skills required

Summit routes are suitable for people with a high level of fitness, experience and skills in rock scrambling.

These routes are not walking tracks, so walking track classifications are not applied to them.

They include steep, near-vertical exposed rock sections that require rock scrambling and climbing skills.

Mount Tibrogargan summit route

Distance: 3km

Time: 3–4hrs

Summit: 364m above sea level

Mount Beerwah summit route—closed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DANGER: For safety reasons, the Mount Beerwah summit route, including access to the cliff face, is closed to all visitors until further notice.

During January 2011, large amounts of rubble and large (up to 10 tonne) boulders fell, or were shifted, by heavy rain. Fallen rock material along and above the summit route is extremely unstable and any access is considered unsafe.

Regular monitoring of the rocks and geotechnical assessments are being undertaken by Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service.

When current risk assessment activities are completed, the current closure will be reviewed.

Persons found ignoring the closure will be fined under the Nature Conservation (Protected Areas Management) Regulation 2006. On the spot fines apply: 4 penalty units ($440 current October 2013). Maximum penalty: 120 penalty units.

Stay safe on summit routes:

  • Wear sturdy, flexible soled footwear with good grip. Helmets are strongly recommended.
  • Always walk with care and avoid dislodging rocks as they might hit walkers or climbers below you—serious injuries have occurred here.
  • Look back regularly—sometimes people freeze in fright at the steepness on the way back down. If you feel uncomfortable, turn around.
  • Do not linger on summit route—this is a high risk rock fall zone with risk of serious injury or death. If you decide to not continue with your group, don’t wait in the high risk zone, go back to the lookout or explore on a walking track around the base of the mountain.
  • Have an experienced group leader and set a suitable group pace—keep to the pace of the least experienced rock scrambler in your group. Pushing limits can lead to injury.
  • Never attempt summit routes in wet weather as smooth surfaces can be slippery and dangerous. The likelihood of rockfalls and landslides are heightened by rainfall and intense fire activity.

Roped sports—abseiling and rockclimbing

Summit rockclimbing and abseiling routes are suitable for experienced and well equipped climbers only.

Take care to avoid dislodging rocks as they might hit walkers or climbers below you—serious injuries have occurred here.

Never attempt these climbs in wet weather as smooth surfaces can be slippery and dangerous. The likelihood of rockfalls and landslides are heightened by rainfall and intense fire activity. Flexible soled shoes with good grip should be worn.

Locations for roped sports:

Mount Ngungun (253m) roped sports

This mountain provides opportunities for moderately challenging rock face climbing and abseiling for 20m to 40m roped sports. Equipment and expertise are essential.

Mount Tibrogargan (364m) roped sports

A challenging and potentially dangerous rock face climbing site that requires a high level of expertise and equipment. There is a risk that severe injury or even death could result from accidents whilst climbing Mount Tibrogargan. If you do not have the required fitness or experience and/or are not willing to assume the risk—do not attempt to climb the mountain.

Mount Beerwah (556m) roped sports

Rockclimbing only in areas outside the currently closed Mount Beerwah summit route. This mountain provides opportunities for challenging and potentially dangerous rock face climbing. A high level of expertise and equipment is required. There is a risk that severe injury or even death could result from accidents whilst climbing Mount Beerwah. If you do not have the required fitness or experience and/or are not willing to assume the risk—do not attempt to climb the mountain.

Your safety is our concern but your responsibility.

  • Never attempt to climb or abseil any mountain unless you are confident you can complete the activity.
  • Always use appropriate equipment. Helmets are strongly recommended.
  • Allow enough time to complete your climb in daylight hours.
  • Carry enough water and food for your climb.
  • Carry a mobile phone and keep emergency phone numbers.
  • Never climb alone.
  • Be aware of those below—be careful not to dislodge rocks when climbing.
  • Watch the weather—if it looks like it will rain do not attempt the climb. Rocks will become slippery and dangerous.
  • Carry a first-aid kit.

Shared trails—horse and mountain-bike riding

Horses and mountain bikes are not permitted on walking tracks in Glass House Mountains National Park. Mountain bikes are permitted on fire management trails.

Shared trails for mountain bikes, walkers and horses are provided nearby in Glass House Mountains Conservation Park.

The Glass House Mountains Conservation Park was previously part of Beerburrum Forest Reserve and includes two sections—The Basin and Black Rock sections.

The Basin section is located between Wamuran and D’Aguilar on the former Caboolture—Kilcoy Rail Line. This area allows horseriding, mountain-bike riding and walking. Best access points are O’Shea Road and Raeen Road.

The Black Rock section is located north east of Woodford township. This area is named after the colour of the underlying rock and features pockets of tall open blackbutt (Eucalyptus pilularis) forest with a wildflower understory.

Other nearby locations including Dularcha National ParkParklands Conservation Park and Eumundi Conservation Park.

Read more about trails in SEQ horse riding trail network. 

Things to know before you go

The Mount Tibrogargan circuit walk is a great walk for families. It leads around the base of the peak and provides good views of the mountain. Photo: Ross Naumann, NPRSR volunteer.

The Mount Tibrogargan circuit walk is a great walk for families. It leads around the base of the peak and provides good views of the mountain. Photo: Ross Naumann, NPRSR volunteer.

Essentials to bring

  • Adequate drinking water
  • First-aid kit and insect repellent
  • Mobile phone
  • For bushwalking: suitable shoes, sunscreen, a hat and long-sleeved shirt.

Opening hours

For your safety, it is recommended you visit Glass House Mountains National Park in daylight hours only.

Pets

Domestic animals are not permitted in Glass House Mountains National Park.

Climate and weather

The Glass House Mountains area has a mild, subtropical climate. The average daily temperature range is 18°C to 28°C in summer and 11°C to 20°C in winter. For more information see the tourism information links.

Fuel and supplies

Fuel and supplies are available at Beerwah and other towns in the region. For more information see the tourism information links.

Staying safe

Access to the Mount Beerwah summit route is currently closed due to unstable boulders and rubble along and above the trail. Photo: NPRSR.

Access to the Mount Beerwah summit route is currently closed due to unstable boulders and rubble along and above the trail. Photo: NPRSR.

  • Choose activities that suit the skills, experience and fitness of your group.
  • Avoid exploring the park during wet weather. Tracks and rock surfaces can be slippery, especially after rain.
  • Stay away from cliff edges.
  • Be aware of those walking and climbing below—be careful not to dislodge rocks.
  • Never walk alone—if something happens to you someone in your group can go for help.
  • Walk to your ability and fitness levels.
  • Supervise children at all times.
  • Carry sufficient drinking water, mobile phone and insect repellent.
  • Carry a first aid-kit and know how to use it.
  • Wear suitable shoes.
  • Plan to complete your activity before dark.
  • Protect yourself from the sun. Wear sunscreen, a hat and long-sleeved shirt, even on cloudy days.
  • Start longer walks at cooler times of the day to avoid heat exhaustion on hot days.
  • Tell friends or family where you are going and when you expect to return. If you change your plans inform them.
  • Observe and comply with all regulatory signs.

For more information, please read the guidelines on safety in parks and forests.

Looking after the park

For generations, the Glass House Mountains have held great spiritual significance for Aboriginal people. Their creation stories and beliefs are reflected in the strong links that continue today. Because these mountains have high spiritual significance for local indigenous people, visitors are asked to be considerate and use only the walking tracks and lookouts provided.

You can help protect these special places and ensure the survival of the plants and animals living here, by following these guidelines:

  • Everything within the national park is protected. Do not take or interfere with plants, animals, soil or rocks.
  • Do not feed or leave food for animals. Human food can harm wildlife and cause some animals to become aggressive.
  • Stay on the track. Do not cut corners or create new tracks.
  • Take your rubbish away with you for appropriate disposal. Rubbish bins are not provided in the park.
  • Obey signs and safety notices.

See the guidelines on caring for parks for more information about protecting our environment and heritage in parks.

Park management

The Department of National Parks, Recreation, Sport and Racing (NPRSR) manages the park under the Nature Conservation Act 1992.

Exotic pine plantations in the surrounding area are managed by HQPlantations Pty Ltd.

Tourism information links

For more information about activities, tours and accommodation in this region, contact:

Sunshine Coast Destinations Ltd

Sunshine Coast Destinations Ltd manages nine accredited Visitor Information Centres across the Sunshine Coast that provide a range of local and regional tourist brochures and information, as well as a tour, attraction and accommodation booking service.

  • 7 Caloundra Road, Caloundra
  • 77 Bulcock Street, Caloundra
  • Jessica Park, Nicklin Way, Minyama
  • Settler's Rotary Park, Reed Street, Glass House Mountains
  • 198 Main Road, Montville
  • Cnr Melrose Parade and Sixth Avenue, Cotton Tree (Maroochydore)
  • Cnr First Ave and Brisbane Rd, Mooloolaba
  • Tickle Park, David Low Way, Coolum Beach
  • Arrivals Terminal, Sunshine Coast Airport, Marcoola

For tourism information for all regions in Queensland see www.queenslandholidays.com.au

Further information

Contact us

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Last updated
18 December 2013