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About Kondalilla

Getting there and getting around

Travelling by car

Bitumen roads lead to Kondalilla Falls National Park on the scenic Blackall Range.

From the Kondalilla Falls Road car park, visitors access the picnic area and the walking track entrance via a 50m downhill walk with multiple stairs.

For GPS and computer navigation use:

  • To access the day-use area and Kondaillia Falls walking tracks use “Kondalilla Falls Road, Montville” as the destination address.
  • To access sections of the Sunshine Coast Hinterland Great Walk where it passes through the park use "Narrows Road, Montville" or "Flaxton Mill Road, Montville" as the destination addresses. See Sunshine Coast Hinterland Great Walk web page for more information and maps.

From Brisbane: travel 54km north along the Bruce Highway (M1), take the Steve Irwin Way Exit 163 (also signed as Glass House Mountains Tourist Drive 24 and the exit for Beerwah).  Follow the scenic Steve Irwin Way approximately 22km north and take the Landsborough turnoff. Continue through the Landsborough township and follow the signs for Montville on the Landsborough—Maleny Road (Blackall Range Tourist Drive 23). Near the top of the range turn right onto the Maleny—Montville Road, travel through Montville and continue on the road which changes names to Main Street and then Flaxton Drive. Approximately 2.6km north of Montville turn left onto Kondalilla Falls Road and travel another 700m to the park entrance.

From the north: travel to Nambour on the Bruce Highway (M1) and take State Route 10 exit (also signed as Blackall Range Tourist Drive 23).At the roundabout take the third exit onto Bli Bli Road heading to Nambour. Follow the Blackall Range tourist drive signs to the Nambour—Mapleton Road (via Bli Bli Road, National Park Road, Netherton Street and Blackall Terrace). Continue to Mapleton (approximately 11.5km) on the top of the Blackall Range. From Mapleton, the turnoff to Kondalilla Falls is approximately 6.3km south along Flaxton Drive which becomes Main Street. Turn right onto Kondalilla Falls Road and travel another 700m to the park entrance car park.

Travelling by public transport

Queensland Rail to Nambour, Sunshine Coast Regional Council Hinterland Connect bus to Montville. Kondalilla Falls Road turnoff is along the bus route (approximately 2.6km before Montville) and the national park is only a 700m walk down Kondalilla Falls Road from the nearest bus drop off point. Contact Translink for train and bus details. Local taxi service is also available.

Wheelchair accessibility

There are no wheelchair-accessible tracks or facilities in Kondalilla National Park due to steep terrain. Nearby, Mapleton Falls National Park has a wheelchair accessible lookout with views of the waterfall and rainforest valley below.

Park features

Kondalilla Falls plummets 90 m into the gorge below. Photo: NPRSR.

Kondalilla Falls plummets 90 m into the gorge below. Photo: NPRSR.

Just behind the Sunshine Coast, in the scenic Blackall Range, Kondalilla National Park is a cool mountain retreat. The park is named after the spectacular Kondalilla Falls, where Skene Creek drops 90 m into a rainforest valley. Kondalilla, an Aboriginal word meaning 'rushing waters', describes this park's waterfall during the summer wet season.

Above the falls, tall open eucalypt forest mingles with rainforest species in wetter areas. A drier forest grows on the western escarpment, featuring casuarinas with a grass tree understorey. Subtropical rainforest grows below the escarpment, where soil and aspect is suitable, and riparian rainforest lines the creek.

Surrounded by farms and towns, this park is an important refuge for many animals and plants including the rare pouched frog, Assa darlingtoni and the bopple nut, Macadamia ternifolia, which is vulnerable to extinction. More than 107 species of birds have been seen in the park, and 70 species of reptiles and 32 species of frogs have been recorded from the Blackall Range and nearby Conondale Range.

Camping and accommodation

Camping

Vehicle acessible camping areas are not provided in Kondalilla National Park. Camping is only permitted at the Flaxton walkers' camp—a bush camp provided especially for walkers on the 58 km Sunshine Coast Hinterland Great Walk.

Vehicle accessible camping areas are provided nearby in Conondale National Park, Imbil State Forest and Mapleton National Park.

Other accommodation

There is a wide range of holiday accommodation in and around Montville, Mapleton, Maleny and other towns in the Sunshine Coast hinterland. For more information see the tourism information links below.

Things to do

Rock pool above Kondalilla Falls on the Kondalilla Falls circuit. Photo: NPRSR.

Rock pool above Kondalilla Falls on the Kondalilla Falls circuit. Photo: NPRSR.

The Kondalilla Falls circuit includes more than 100 steps. What goes down must come back up! Choose a walk to suit your groups fitness levels. Photo: Ross Naumann.

The Kondalilla Falls circuit includes more than 100 steps. What goes down must come back up! Choose a walk to suit your groups fitness levels. Photo: Ross Naumann.

Forest view from the top of Kondalilla Falls. Photo: Ross Naumann.

Forest view from the top of Kondalilla Falls. Photo: Ross Naumann.

Picnic creek circuit.  Photo: Ross Naumann.

Picnic creek circuit. Photo: Ross Naumann.

Picnic in the large grassed day-use area. A short downhill walk from the car park. Photo: Ross Naumann.

Picnic in the large grassed day-use area. A short downhill walk from the car park. Photo: Ross Naumann.

Walking

Several short walking tracks are provided in Kondalilla National Park.

The Sunshine Coast Hinterland Great Walk, a 58 km Class 4 walking track with several overnight campsites, passes through Kondalilla National Park. Walkers can also take shorter day walks along this Great Walk.

There are more short walk opportunities nearby in Mapleton Falls National Park and Mapleton National Park.

Key to track standards

Use the walking track grade listed with each walking track description to choose walks suitable for your group's abilities and fitness levels.

Walking track grades

Class 2 track (Australian Standards)
  • Easy level track, suitable for all fitness levels.
Class 3 track (Australian Standards)
  • Gently sloping, well-defined track with slight inclines or few steps.
  • Caution needed on decomposed granite and exposed natural lookouts.
  • Reasonable level of fitness and ankle-supporting footwear required.|

Picnic Creek circuit (Class 2)

Distance: 1.7 km

Time: allow 45 minutes to 1 hour

Details: This easy walk crosses Picnic Creek (400 m), passes through tall eucalypt forest with patches of wet sclerophyll forest—a mix of eucalypt and rainforest species. Enjoy views over the valley from a lookout point.

Kondalilla Falls circuit (Class 3)

Distance: 4.7 km

Time: allow 2-3 hours

Details: Follow the Picnic Creek circuit down the escarpment, past rock pools and a lookout with views of Kondalilla Falls. Walk through rainforest to the base of the waterfall and continue back up the ridge. Look for emergent bunya pines with their distinctive symmetrical dome shapes, dense stands of piccabeen palms and intriguing shapes of pink ash, Alphitonia petriei.

What goes down must come back up! There are over 100 stairs on the Kondalilla Falls circuit so you need to be reasonably fit. Always allow enough time to finish your walk in daylight hours.

Wet weather track closures

Walking tracks are closed during severe wet weather due to flooding of the tracks. For your safety, do not enter the park when closure signs are displayed.

If you are caught out on the tracks when creek crossings flood, do not attempt to cross them. Wait until the water no longer covers the track.

Water rises and falls in a short period of time. For example, in 1998 Kondalilla National Park was closed when 50mm of rain fell in 15 minutes! Water rose rapidly, transforming the cascading creek into a fast flowing, turbulent water mass. Bridges and creek crossings were cut by floodwaters and conditions were extremely dangerous. Within hours the water had dropped and the tracks were re-opened.

Danger: A number of people have died or been permanently paralysed after slipping over waterfalls at Kondalilla and nearby parks. Stay behind fences and follow all warning signs.

Picnic and day use areas

A 50 m downhill walk with steps leads from the carpark to a large grassed picnic area. There are toilets, picnic tables, barbecues and a shelter shed. The walking tracks start from the picnic area.

There are also picnic areas and facilities at nearby Mapleton Falls National Park, Mapleton National Park and Lake Baroon.

Viewing wildlife

Birdwatching and nature photography are popular activities here. See the description of the Blackall Ranges' nature, culture and history for more details about Kondalilla's wildlife.

Things to know before you go

Essentials to bring

  • Bring insect repellent to discourage mosquitoes, leeches and ticks.
  • Bring your own drinking water as it is not available at the park. Creek water is unsuitable for drinking as it may contain organisms that can cause illness.
  • Wear sturdy shoes, a hat, protective clothing and sunscreen.
  • Bring rubbish bags to remove your rubbish and recyclables from the park. Rubbish bins are not provided.

Opening hours

For your safety, walk in Kondalilla National Park in daylight hours only.

Permits and fees

Permits may be required for commercial or organised activities. Contact us for further information.

Pets

Domestic animals are not permitted in Kondalilla National Park.

Climate and weather

Local temperatures can rise above 30 degrees Celcius in summer and drop to freezing point overnight in winter. Nights can be cool at anytime of the year.

Always check weather conditions before your visit. Be aware that forest areas are hazardous during strong winds, as tree branches may fall.

During severe wet weather, which occurs mostly in spring and summer, some tracks flood and are closed for public safety. Check park alerts for current warnings or park closures.

For more information see the Bureau of Meteorology website and tourism information links.

Fuel and supplies

Fuel and supplies are available in Montville, Mapleton and Maleny. For more information see the tourism information links.

Staying safe

A number of people have died or been permanently paralysed after slipping over waterfalls in this area. Always supervise children, keep to the walking tracks, stay behind safety fences and follow all warning signs to avoid tragedy.

  • Stay on track. Remain behind barriers at lookouts and waterfalls. Tell a responsible person where you are going and when you expect to return. Wear sturdy shoes. Carry adequate clothing, water and snack food.
  • Supervise children. Natural areas have hazards that children are unfamiliar with including creeks, cliff edges, stinging plants and wildlife.
  • Water hazards—never dive into creeks or rock pools. They contain submerged rocks and logs. Water depth is variable and unpredicatbale. Rock surfaces can be slippery.
  • Carry a first-aid kit—and know how to use it. Use insect repellent on exposed skin and shoes to discourage mosquitoes, leeches and ticks. Remove ticks immediately.
  • Carry fresh water. Drinking water is not provided. Creek water is unsuitable for drinking as it may contain organisms that can cause illness.
  • Human food is not for wildlife—it can cause overpopulation, illness and aggressive behaviour.
  • Check Park alerts for current warnings or closures. Walking tracks are closed during severe wet weather due to flooding of the tracks. For your safety, do not enter the park when the closure signs are displayed.
  • Do not attempt to cross flooded creeks. If you are caught out on the tracks when creek crossings flood, wait until the water no longer covers the track. Water rises and falls in a short period of time.
  • For all emergencies call 000. Mobile phone reception is poor in these areas. If you have difficulty connecting to 000 from your mobile phone, try dialling 112.
In an emergency
  • Ambulance, non-urgent medical transport: 13 12 33
  • Emergency: 000
  • If you have difficulty connecting to 000 from your mobile phone: 112

Mobile phone coverage is not reliable in the park, but it is usually possible to make calls from the carpark.

For more information about staying safe while visiting national parks, please read the guidelines Safety in parks and forests.

Looking after the park

Help protect natural resources by being a minimal impact visitor.

  • Take all your rubbish out of the park. Remove excess food packaging at home before your visit to the park and pack strong sealable bags or containers to store food and rubbish.
  • Keep creeks clean—they provide valuable habitat for wildlife including rare frogs.
  • Leave domestic animals at home. They are not allowed in Kondalilla National Park. Domestic animals can distress or kill native animals that live here.

See Caring for parks for more information about protecting our environment and heritage in parks.

Park management

The area around Kondalilla Falls was first protected in 1906 as a small recreational area and became national park in 1945. Since then various additions of land, including former State forest, have increased that park's size to 1591 ha.

A Management Plan for Kondalilla National Park, completed in 1998, is currently being reviewed.

See nature, culture and history for more information about the history and values of Kondalilla National Park.

Tourism information links

Montville Tourist Information Centre
Main Street, Montville
ph (07) 5478 5544

Maroochy Tourism
www.maroochytourism.com
Cnr Melrose Pde; Sixth Ave, Cotton Tree QLD 4558
ph (07) 5479 1566 or 1800 882 032
fax (07) 5479 1761
email admin@maroochytourism.com

For tourism information for all regions in Queensland see

www.queenslandholidays.com.au.

Further information

Contact us

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Last updated
6 February 2014