Skip links and keyboard navigation

About Kroombit Tops

Park alerts

No current alerts for this park. See alerts for all parks.

Getting there and getting around

Access

Major access routes are from Gladstone, Biloela, Monto or Ubobo.

Most access routes require a four-wheel-drive vehicle. Your type of vehicle and the weather affects which access route you choose to Kroombit Tops.

Conventional vehicle access, in dry conditions only, is possible from Gladstone and Ubobo. Within the park conventional vehicles can only access Griffith Creek camping area, the Lookout and associated walking tracks.

Access from Gladstone (approximately 85km):

Driving conditions: Access roads suitable for conventional vehicles in dry conditions.
Access route: Travel south-west to Calliope, then follow the Dawson Highway south-west towards Biloela for 4km and turn left into Gladstone-Monto Road. Follow this road for 500 m then turn right into Tableland Road. This road is suitable for 2WD vehicles in dry weather only. From here, it is a further 68km along Tableland Road to the park boundary.

Access from Biloela (approximately 40km):

Driving conditions: you need a high clearance four-wheel-drive. There is no trailer access from this route because the road has long, steep and narrow sections. This is a dry weather access only route because there are numerous creek crossings and very steep gradients, which are very hazardous in wet conditions.
Access route: Near the Biloela Information Centre turn off the Dawson Highway onto Callide Street which becomes Valentine Plains Road. Follow this road for approximately 37kms to the national park boundary and continue through the park for 27km on the Razorback Track.

Access from Monto (approximately 66km):

Driving conditions: You need a four-wheel-drive vehicle. This is a dry weather access only route because there are numerous creek crossings and black soil that becomes very hazardous in wet conditions.
Access route: Travel 12km north along the Burnett Highway. Turn right into Cania Road and pass through Moonford. Turn right onto Wongalee Road and drive until you reach Clonmel Road. Follow Clonmel Road for about 20km and continue along Mahoon Creek Road for a further 20km before turning left into the park access road.

Access from Ubobo (approximately 70km):

Driving conditions: Access roads suitable for conventional vehicles.
Access route: take the unsealed Cedarvale Road west for 20km to Clifton Road. Head north for 25km (via Clifton Road and Diglum Road) to Tableland Road. Turn left and drive a further 25km to the park boundary.

Roads within the park

Tableland Road is accessible by conventional vehicles in dry conditions.

Razorback track is accessible only by high clearance four-wheel-drives in dry conditions. This route is unsuitable for trailers, camper trailers or caravans because the road has long, steep and narrow sections.

Bomber site car park access is suitable for four-wheel-drives only.

Scenic 4WD Loop road is suitable for high clearance four-wheel-drives only. It is unsuitable for lower clearance all-wheel-drives—there is a very high risk of vehicle damage when traversing the rocky terrain. Be aware that a section of this road is one-way traffic only. Refer to park map (PDF, 169K)*.

Drive with caution!

  • Horses, cattle and wildlife may run on to the road anywhere in this country area.  Be alert and drive with caution.
  • The Bicentennial National Trail shares some roads within the park—as you drive look out for horse riders, mountain-bike riders and walkers.
  • Many roads are unsealed and impassable when wet. Contact the Queensland Government's Traffic and Travel Information Service (phone 13 19 40) to enquire about local road conditions.

Wheelchair accessibility

The only wheelchair-accessible facilities in Kroombit Tops National Park are the lookout and the toilets at this site. The lookout access is over a hard dirt surface with only slight incline. Toilet access is at ground level.

Park features

Kroombit Tops offers visitors the chance to get back to nature and camp without facilities, away from phones and technology, in small camping areas with fire-rings for a traditional bush cooking experience.

Take a bushwalk and explore forests on four-wheel-drive roads. Open forests dominated by Sydney blue gum, pink bloodwood and rough-barked apple trees flourish on the park’s eastern slopes. In the wetter south-eastern sandstone country, blackbutt forests dominate, and subtropical rainforests grow around some of the creeks. Many birds and animals in Kroombit Tops National Park are at the northern or southern limit of their distribution and it is the only known home to the endangered Kroombit tinkerfrog.

See the remains of a WWII Liberator bomber that crashed at Kroombit Tops in 1945 and remained hidden in the forest until it was discovered nearly 50 years later.

Camping and accommodation

Camping

Three camping areas are provided—Griffiths Creek camping area, The Razorback camping area and The Wall camping area.

Griffith Creek camping area is accessible by conventional vehicle in dry conditions only. Razorback camping area is accessible by four-wheel-drive. The Wall camping area is accessible by a rough track suitable only for high clearance four-wheel-drives.

Facilities are not provided in these camping areas—campers must be fully self-sufficient.

You must book your camping permit before you arrive. Be aware that you cannot make a camping booking at the camping area—phone reception is very poor. Penalties apply for camping without a permit.

Fees apply and a tag with your booking number must be displayed at your camp site.

Other accommodation

There is a range of holiday accommodation in and around Gladstone, Calliope, Monto, Biloela and Ubobo. See the tourism information links for more details.

Things to do

The lookout provides scenic views to the north-east. Photo: Queensland Government.

The lookout provides scenic views to the north-east. Photo: Queensland Government.

Travelling from Biloela on the Razorback track? Stop and enjoy the Marble waterhole. Photo: Queensland Government.

Travelling from Biloela on the Razorback track? Stop and enjoy the Marble waterhole. Photo: Queensland Government.

Griffith Creek runs beside the Griffith Creek camping area. It is a great place to camp or have a picnic. Photo: Queensland Government.

Griffith Creek runs beside the Griffith Creek camping area. It is a great place to camp or have a picnic. Photo: Queensland Government.

Landscape view from The Loop road, a high clearance 4WD circuit. Photo: Queensland Government.

Landscape view from The Loop road, a high clearance 4WD circuit. Photo: Queensland Government.

Walking

Three short walking tracks and a longer hike give you a closer look at Kroombit Tops’ many natural and cultural attractions.

Walking track grades
Use walking track grades to choose a walk suitable for your group’s ability and fitness.

   

Grade 1 walking track: flat, well-formed track, no steps; clearly sign posted; suitable for wheel-chairs with assistance; no bushwalking experience required.

    Grade 3  walking track: gently sloping, well-defined track with rough surface and some steps; cliff edges and lookouts generally not fenced—appropriate caution required; reasonable level of fitness and ankle-supporting footwear required; some bush walking experience recommended.

Walks 

 The lookout walk

Distance: 100m return
Allow: 10mins
Details: Suitable for wheelchairs—this track has a natural hard dirt surface, gentle incline, single road-way width. Spectacular views from the eastern escarpment looking over the Boyne Valley—look for ribbons of dark green rainforest among the paler eucalyptus woodlands in the valley below.

 Rainforest walk

Distance: 300m return
Allow: 10mins
Details: Discover Kroombit Tops’ unusual tropical rainforest along this easy circuit track through palms, vines and tall trees near Munholme Creek.

 Beautiful Betsy bomber crash site

Distance: 700m return
Allow: 30mins
Details: This short walk takes you to the final resting place of Beautiful Betsy a WWII Liberator bomber that crashed on the western side of the plateau in 1945. Interpretive signs along the way help you understand the tragic event. This area is a war grave, please treat it respectfully and leave it as you found it.

 Escarpment track

Distance: 13km one-way
Time: 5hrs
Details: Hike this track along the eastern escarpment through open blackbutt forest with glimpses of the Boyne Valley to the north-east. Watch for peregrine falcons soaring around rocky cliff tops. Please keep to the track and away from the cliff edges. Camping is not permitted along the escarpment. This is not a circuit track, so arrange a support vehicle to drop you off and pick you up.

Remote hikes

Rugged gorges and sandstone escarpments challenge even the most experienced bushwalkers. Before embarking on a remote hike, plan your trip well in advance. Contact us for further information to help you plan a safe and enjoyable trip.

Driving

You can take an adventurous drive along 4WD-only routes in the park’s drier rocky west.

Be cautious! Horses, cattle and wildlife may run on to the road anywhere in this country area.  Be alert and drive with caution.

The Bicentennial National Trail shares some roads within the park—as you drive look out for horse riders, mountain-bike riders and walkers.

The Bomber crash site—20km one-way from the Tableland Road/Loop Road junction. Allow 2hrs.

High-clearance four-wheel-drive vehicles recommended; route suitable for most drivers. May be accessible by other all-wheel-drives with good clearance and four-wheel-driving experience but caution is required to avoid vehicle damage.

Take an easy drive along the two-way section of the Loop Road. Take the Bomber site turnoff onto a narrower two-way track—drive cautiously on this section as you may have to pull over to allow an oncoming vehicle to pass.

Take the short walk 700m into the bomber crash site.

The Loop road—35km circuit. Allow 2hrs.

Route is suitable for high clearance four-wheel-drives only and drivers with a reasonable level of bush track four-wheel-driving experience.

It is not suitable for all-wheel-drive vehicles and inexperienced drivers.

The route includes steep rocky sections and a narrower one-way traffic only section.

Beyond the Bomber Crash site turnoff, the road narrows and includes rough, rocky sections that require caution to avoid vehicle damage.

The Wall is a great place to stop for a picnic.

Travelling north from The Wall, the track is a one-way route only to the main access road. You will notice the vegetation change from dry open forest to wetter blackbutt dominated forest as you drive north. Enjoy stunning vistas over gorges and valleys from two natural lookouts along this section of the road.

The Razorback Track—27km one-way from the Valentine Plains Road entrance on the western park boundary to Tablelands Road. Allow 2hrs.

Route is suitable for high clearance four-wheel-drives only and drivers with a reasonable level of bush track four-wheel-driving experience. It is a dry-weather-only track.

It is not suitable for all-wheel-drive vehicles and inexperienced drivers.
The route includes numerous creek crossings, steep ascents and descents and narrow sections.

The Razorback track takes visitors from Kroombit Tops’ western boundary up through rugged terrain in panoramic scenery atop twisting ridges and into the core of the park. It is also accessible at its eastern end via Tablelands Road as a challenging and rewarding scenic drive.

Read more about four-wheel-driving in parks.

Day-use areas

The lookout

Day-use facilities—picnic tables and a toilet—are located beside the car park.

Take a short 100m return walk to the lookout to enjoy spectacular views over the Boyne Valley from the eastern escarpment. Look for ribbons of dark green rainforest among the paler eucalyptus woodlands in the valley below.

Picnicking in other areas

Enjoy a forest picnic in any of Kroombit Tops’ cleared grassy areas. The banks of Griffith Creek, opposite the camping area, are an ideal place to enjoy a picnic.

Remember, you need to be entirely self-sufficient when picnicking away from facilities. Bury all toilet waste at least 20cm deep and 100m from waterways, tracks and camp sites. Preferably bring a portable toilet to minimise pollution in this area—dispose of toilet waste appropriately.

Viewing wildlife

Wildlife is best spotted early in the morning or in the evening.

By day, rock-wallabies bound across rocky outcrops near Kroombit Creek. At night, micro-bats hunt for insects in the dry rainforest and yellow-bellied gliders scurry through the tree tops while powerful owls hunt for prey.

You may see flashes of colour as flocks of scaly-breasted, rainbow and little lorikeets screech through open woodlands. Wedge-tailed eagles soar above and peregrine falcons nest on escarpment cliffs. Listen for green catbirds and paradise riflebirds—their distinctive calls fill the rainforest with sound.

Encounter eastern water dragons, lace monitors and red-bellied black snakes sunning themselves by creeks. Look for small darting lizards on rocky ledges.

Only at Kroombit Tops can you hear the unusual call of the endangered Kroombit tinkerfrog—a series of sharp, metallic 'tinks'. This elusive frog lives in small patches of rainforest where it is believed to spend much of its time hiding between large rocks.

Bicentennial National Trail

The trail traverses Kroombit Tops National Park in an east/west direction, with designated camps along the way. A large section of the trail is open only to hikers, non-motorised vehicles and horses. Contact the Bicentennial National Trail on 1300 138 724 or visit the National Trail website for maps and further information.

Read about the horse riding trail networks in parks and forests.

Things to know before you go

Essentials to bring

There are few facilities available at the park, so you must be self-sufficient. Plan ahead to ensure you bring enough fuel, food and drinking water.

  • Bring a fuel or gas stove for cooking or bring your own clean, milled timber for firewood.
  • Carry a well-equipped first-aid kit and mobile phone.
  • Bring sufficient drinking water.
  • Pack strong rubbish bags, so you can take your rubbish with you when you leave. Rubbish bins are not provided.
  • Pack appropriate clothing. Wear sturdy footwear. Be prepared for cool nights, especially in winter.
  • Bring insect repellent and sunscreen.
  • The only toilet on the park is at the lookout. Please bring a shovel for burying toilet waste.
  • Bring your camera and binoculars for viewing wildlife. Torches—preferably with a red filter to reduce light intensity—are useful for spotlighting at night.

Mobile phone reception

Mobile phone reception is not available in many areas of the park. Several areas where phone reception is possible are marked with telephone signal totem signs. There is mobile phone reception at the Lookout; 600m north of The Barracks, at the end of the bitumen on Tableland Road; at the Bomber site.

Emergency communication devices are recommended

For good communication in emergency situations it is recommended that you have alternative emergency communication devices—a UHF radio or an emergency beacon device.

A hand-held EPRIB (Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon) or PLB (Personal Locator Beacon) is recommended however coverage may be variable. These devices can be hired from various outlets. Before you leave, ensure you register you EPRIB or PLB. For more information on how to obtain and register an EPIRB or PLB contact the Australian Maritime Safety Authority by phone 1800 406 406 (business hours), or email: ausbeacon@amsa.gov.au.

Opening hours

Kroombit Tops National Park is open 24 hours a day.

Permits and fees

Camping permits are required and fees apply. A tag with your booking number must be displayed at your camp site.

Be aware you must book your camping permit before you arrive. You cannot make a camping booking at the camping area—phone reception is very poor. Penalties apply for camping without a permit.

Other permits

Permits are required for all commercial activities or group activities within the park.

Pets

Domestic animals are not permitted in Kroombit Tops National Park, with the exception of horses along the Bicentennial National Trail.

Climate and weather

Temperatures at Kroombit Tops are generally 5-10ºC cooler than surrounding lowlands and can be quite cold in winter, especially at night.

Rainfall is higher than surrounding areas with most rain falling during summer. After heavy rainfall: check Park Alerts before visiting, and Queensland Government traffic and travel information (13 19 40) for road conditions.

Fuel and supplies

Fuel and supplies are available at Monto, Calliope, Biloela and Ubobo. For more information see the tourism information links below.

Staying safe

Whether you go for a short stroll or stay overnight, be self-sufficient and take care of yourself.

  • Watch for wildlife and cattle on the roads, particularly around Kroombit Creek.
  • In wet weather unsealed roads become impassable.
  • Stay with your vehicle if it breaks down. A vehicle is much easier to find than a person.
  • Only attempt the scenic 4WD loop road in a high-clearance 4WD vehicle.
  • Never walk alone and tell family or friends where you are going and when you expect to return.
  • Always carry a first-aid kit and extra drinking water in case you take longer than expected.
  • Keep clear of cliff edges. Keep to marked tracks and make sure children do not run ahead.
  • Wear appropriate clothing and footwear to protect you against the sun, cold and venomous bites.
  • Never leave a campfire unattended. Stay with children and don't let them sit too close. Don't let a campfire turn into a wildfire—keep campfires small.
  • Beware of falling branches during severe storms and strong winds.
  • Carry suitable emergency communication equipment.

For more information, please read the guidelines on safety in parks and forests.

In an emergency

Call Triple Zero (000) in an emergency or try 112 if this fails.

Mobile phone reception is not available in many areas of the park. Several areas where phone reception is possible are marked with telephone signal totem signs. There is mobile phone reception at the Lookout; 600m north of The Barracks, at the end of the bitumen on Tableland Road; at the Bomber site.

For good communication in emergency situations it is recommended that you have alternative emergency communication devices—a UHF radio or an emergency beacon device.

Looking after the park

Please help protect Kroombit Tops National Park by following these guidelines.

  • Use a portable stove to reduce fire danger and eliminate the need for firewood.
  • Bring your own clean, milled timber for firewood. Collecting wood in national parks is prohibited.
  • Use fire-rings only for campfires. They have been placed so they are clear of surrounding vegetation.
  • Avoid contaminating water. Wash yourself and your cooking utensils at least 50m away from waterways.
  • Bury all toilet waste (and paper) 20cm deep and at least 100m from waterways, tracks and camp sites. Preferably bring a portable toilet to minimise pollution in this area—dispose of toilet waste appropriately.
  • Take all rubbish home. There are no rubbish bins in the park. Never burn or bury it.
  • Avoid feeding native animals as our foods can be harmful to them and you might be bitten or scratched.
  • Check and clean mud and seeds from your shoes, tyres and tents before and after entering parks to help prevent the spread of weeds and the deadly chytrid fungus that kills frogs.
  • Leave Kroombit Tops as you found it. Everything in the park, including all parts of the WWII bomber wreckage, is protected.

See caring for parks for more information about protecting our environment and heritage in parks.

Park management

The Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service, which is part of the Department of National Parks, Recreation, Sport and Racing, manages Kroombit Tops National Park for the enjoyment of visitors and the conservation of our natural and cultural heritage. Read the park’s management statement.

Tourism information links

Biloela Visitor Information Centre
437 Callide Street
Biloela Qld 4715
ph (07) 4992 2405
email biloinfo@people.net.au

Gladstone Visitor Information Centre
www.gladstoneregion.org.au
Marina Ferry Terminal
Bryan Jordan Drive, Gladstone QLD 4680
ph (07) 4972 9000
fax (07) 4972 5006
email gladstonevic@gapdl.com.au

For tourism information for all regions in Queensland see www.queenslandholidays.com.au.

Further information

Contact us

* Requires Adobe Reader

Last updated
5 September 2014