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About Lamington

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Getting there and getting around

Walking is the only way to see the park's many natural features. Photo: Queensland Government.

Walking is the only way to see the park's many natural features. Photo: Queensland Government.

'Kurraragin' (Egg Rock) is one of the many volcanic features shaping the park's landscapes. Photo: Adam Creed, Queensland Government.

'Kurraragin' (Egg Rock) is one of the many volcanic features shaping the park's landscapes. Photo: Adam Creed, Queensland Government.

Lamington National Park is made up of two sections: Green Mountains and Binna Burra. Green Mountains section is located on the western side of the Lamington Plateau in an area called O'Reilly.

Getting to Green Mountains (O'Reilly)

From Broadbeach, drive 40 km to Canungra via Nerang. From the north, take Pacific Motorway exit 34 to Beenleigh, route 92 to Tamborine, and route 90 to Canungra. The 36 km winding and often narrow bitumen road from Canungra requires care and takes at least 50 min. This road is unsuitable for caravans.

Getting to Binna Burra

Allow 70 min from Broadbeach. Drive 38 km to Beechmont via Nerang. From the north, take Pacific Motorway exit 69 and follow the signs west to Lamington National Park—Binna Burra. The final section of the 10 km drive is very narrow.

There are many commercial tour operators that conduct tours to Lamington National Park. There is no public transport to the park.

Wheelchair accessibility

There are wheelchair-accessible toilet facilities at Lamington National Park. Binna Burra section has wheelchair-accessible picnic tables.

A trail for vision-impaired visitors is located on private land near Binna Burra Mountain Lodge.

Park features

Coomera Falls. Photo: Queensland Government.

Coomera Falls. Photo: Queensland Government.

Declared in 1915, Lamington National Park covers 20 590 ha and boasts extensive walking tracks along the McPherson Range, which allow visitors to explore the area's forests, creeks and waterfalls.

Dramatic lookouts in Lamington afford views over the Gold Coast, south-east Queensland and northern New South Wales.

Lamington is part of the Gondwana Rainforests of Australia World Heritage Area, which includes the most extensive areas of subtropical rainforest in the world, most of the world's warm temperate rainforest and nearly all of the Antarctic beech Nothofagus moorei cool temperate rainforest.

Camping and accommodation

Green Mountains camping area has tent and campervan sites. Photo: Adam Creed, Queensland Government.

Green Mountains camping area has tent and campervan sites. Photo: Adam Creed, Queensland Government.

Camping

The national park camping area is located at Green Mountains section, 200 m from the park's information centre. Camping permits must be booked online and in advance for all weekends, public and school holidays.

There are separate camp sites allocated for visitors booked to walk the Gold Coast Hinterland Great Walk. If you are not booked on this walk, please do not camp in this designated area.

To camp in the national park a permit is required and bookings must be made in advance. Fees apply.

Read Things to know before you go for information about essentials to bring with you when camping in Lamington National Park. Binna Burra Mountain Lodge manages a camping area adjacent to the Binna Burra section of Lamington National Park. Other camping options are available within easy driving distance of the park.

Please read and follow the guidelines for staying safe and for walking softly in the park and minimise your impact.

Other accommodation

There is alternative accommodation neighbouring the park as well as there being a wide range of holiday accommodation in and around Canungra, Beechmont and other towns in the Gold Coast hinterland. For more information see the tourism information links below.

Things to do

With approximately 160 km of walking tracks, it is easy to get away from it all and discover the natural wonders of this World Heritage park. Photo: Robert Ashdown, Queensland Government.

With approximately 160 km of walking tracks, it is easy to get away from it all and discover the natural wonders of this World Heritage park. Photo: Robert Ashdown, Queensland Government.

Lamington plays a vital role in protecting a rich diversity of globally significant wildlife, such as the Richmond birdwing butterfly Ornithoptera richmondia. Photo: Queensland Museum.

Lamington plays a vital role in protecting a rich diversity of globally significant wildlife, such as the Richmond birdwing butterfly Ornithoptera richmondia. Photo: Queensland Museum.

Lamington National Park offers many opportunities for the visitor to explore and enjoy the natural surrounds:

Walking

Lamington National Park offers a wide range of walking opportunities ranging from easy strolls to challenging full-day hikes. The Gold Coast Hinterland Great Walk can either start or finish at the Green Mountains campground. For those interested in undertaking this 54 km walk, please read the walk's details to plan your Gold Coast Hinterland Great Walk.

Choose from the many half-day or full-day walks that explore the park's best attractions. Allow 15 to 20 min to walk 1 km. This time is calculated for people of average fitness and bushwalking experience and who are wearing correct footwear. Allow more time to include rests and to return to your starting point if walking with small children or are an inexperienced bushwalker.

Distances given are from the track entrance and return.

'Boogul yahnbelehla' (have a good walk)!

Lamington National Park walking tracks

Before walking in Lamington National Park we recommend you please have a copy of the Lamington National Park Guide from the either of the park's information centre.

Key to track standards

The classification system is based on Australian Standards. Please note that while each track is classified according to its most difficult section, other sections may be of an easier level.

Class 2 walking track Class 2 (Australian Standards)
  • Easy level track, suitable for all fitness levels—no previous bushwalking experience necessary.
  • All junctions sign-posted and may include interpretive signs.
Class 3 walking track Class 3 (Australian Standards)
  • Distinct tracks with junctions sign-posted, rough track surfaces with some exposed roots and rocks.
  • Variable in width; muddy sections, steep grades and steps may be encountered.
  • May be partially overgrown; hazards such as fallen trees and rockfalls may be present.
  • Caution needed at creek crossings, cliff edges and naturally occurring lookouts.
  • Reasonable level of fitness required and ankle-supporting footwear recommended.
Class 4 walking track Class 4 (Australian Standards)
  • Distinct tracks with junctions sign-posted, rough track surfaces with some exposed roots and rocks.
  • Variable in width; muddy sections, steep grades and steps may be encountered.
  • May be extensively overgrown; hazards such as fallen trees and rockfalls likely to be present.
  • Caution needed at creek crossings, cliff edges and naturally occurring lookouts.
  • Moderate fitness level with previous experience and ankle-supporting footwear strongly recommended.

 Class 5 track (Australian standards)

  • No signs or markers provided, except where necessary to reduce environmental damage. Trails may range from clearly visible footpads to indistinct, overgrown routes depending on levels of usage.
  • Muddy sections, steep grades and numerous hazards such as fallen trees and rock falls highly likely to be encountered.
  • No bridges, no fences on cliff edges or lookouts, high level of caution required.
  • High level of fitness, ankle-supporting footwear, good navigational skills, extensive off-track walking experience, relevant topographic maps and compass essential.

The Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service (QPWS) is currently completing walking track classification assessments of all walking tracks in Lamington and Springbrook national parks. These assessments will better inform future walking track management decisions.

Where necessary additional advice regarding any track classification variations will be provided on this webpage.

Walking tracks at a glance

Matching experience and expectations—to make planning easier, simply match expectations and experience with the most suitable track or trail.

  • Platform lookout: this indicates a lookout with a built platform and handrails.
  • Natural lookout: this indicates a lookout with no built structure or handrails. Please keep away from the edge and supervise children at all times. Take extra care when using binoculars or cameras at these sites!
Track name Classification Distance return Platform lookout Natural lookout

Half-day walks from Green Mountains 

Rainforest return

Class 2 Class 2 walking track

1.4 km - -
Python Rock track Class 3 Class 3 walking track 3.1 km Yes -
Morans Falls track Class 3 Class 3 walking track 4.4 km Yes -

Full-day walks from Green Mountains 

Box Forest circuit Class 4 Class 4 walking track 10.9 km - -
West Canungra Creek circuit Class 4 Class 4 walking track 13.9 km - -
Toolona Creek circuit Class 4 Class 4 walking track 17.4 km - -
Albert River circuit Class 4 Class 4 walking track 21.8 km - Yes
Border Track Class 4 Class 4 walking track 21.4 km one way - Yes
Mount Merino track Class 4 Class 4 walking track 24 km - Yes

Half-day walks from Binna Burra section 

Rainforest circuit Class 2 Class 2 walking track 1.2 km - -
Bellbird lookout track Class 4 Class 4 walking track 2 km - Yes
Caves circuit Class 4 Class 4 walking track 5 km - Yes
Tullawallal circuit Class 3 Class 3 walking track 5 km - -
Gwongoorool track Class 4 Class 4 walking track 6 km - -

Full-day walks from Binna Burra section 

Daves Creek circuit Class 4 Class 4 walking track 12 km - Yes
Lower Bellbird circuit Class 4 Class 4 walking track 12 km - Yes
Illinbah circuit Class 5  16.6 km - -
Coomera circuit Class 4 Class 4 walking track 17.4 km Yes -
Araucaria lookout track Class 4 Class 4 walking track 17.8 km - Yes
Wagawn track Class 4 Class 4 walking track 18 km - Yes
Mount Hobwee circuit Class 4 Class 4 walking track 18.2 km - Yes
Ships Stern circuit Class 4 Class 4 walking track 21 km - Yes
Mount Merino track Class 4 Class 4 walking track 21.6 km - Yes
Border Track Class 4 Class 4 walking track 21.4 km one way - Yes

Half-day walks in Green Mountains section

(Distances given are from the trailhead and return.)

Class 2 walking track Rainforest return (Class 2)

Distance: 1.4 km return

Time: Allow about 30 min walking time

Details: A short walk follows the Border Track through rainforest for 700 m. The large boulders just past the entrance are a good example of how exposed basalt eventually decomposes by a weathering process (exfoliation) into spherical boulder shapes. This walk offers excellent birdwatching opportunities. Watch for yellow-throated scrubwrens and logrunners among the leaf litter.

Class 3 walking track Python Rock track (Class 3)

Distance: 3.1 km return

Time: Allow about 1 hr walking time

Details: This track leaves the Lamington National Park Road 800 m downhill from the national park's information centre. Take care when walking beside the bitumen road especially on weekends when traffic is busy. Some parking is available at the track entrance. Python Rock lookout provides views of Morans Falls, Castle Crag and Lost World. Views from the lookout highlight the geological processes of erosion, including valley widening and escarpment formation.

This track passes through a closed rainforest community into an open eucalypt forest where fire-adapted species such as grass trees, hakeas and various wildflowers grow. The guttural 'popping' of the masked mountain frog Kyarranus loveridgei can be heard on wet or moist days in late spring and summer. These ancient frogs are members of the Gondwanan family commonly known as southern frogs.

Class 3 walking track Morans Falls track (Class 3)

Distance: 4.4 km return

Time: Allow about 1.5 hr walking time

Details: This track leaves the Lamington National Park Road 800 m downhill from the national park's information centre. Some parking is available at the track entrance. Take care when walking beside the bitumen road especially on weekends when traffic is busy. An excellent view of Morans Falls and Morans Creek gorge can be seen from the constructed lookout located before the creek crossing. Layers of ancient volcanic lava flows are also visible; the more resistant have formed small cliff-lines along the valley, and are best seen at the second lookout located at the end of the track.

Full-day walks in Green Mountains section

(Distances given are from the trailhead and return.)

Class 4 walking track Box Forest circuit (Class 4)

Distance: 10.9 km return

Time: Allow about 4 hr walking time

Details: This circuit branches from the Border Track (3.2 km from the trailhead) and leads directly to Picnic Rock and Elabana Falls. It leads you through rainforest, past impressive stands of smooth, pink-barked brush box Lophostemon confertus, before reaching the falls. Similar brush box in other parts of the World Heritage area have been radiocarbon-dated at 1500 years, making these giants the oldest ever carbon-dated trees on Australia's mainland.

If you intend walking this entire circuit, walk in a clockwise direction and exit via Elabana Falls and Picnic Rock.

Class 4 walking track West Canungra Creek circuit (Class 4)

Due to gradient, we recommend you walk this track clockwise.

Distance: 13.9 km return

Time: Allow about 5.5 hr walking time

Details: The circuit descends to 'Yerralahla' (blue pool) passing by some large rainforest trees including red cedar Toona ciliata, and then follows the creek for most of its length, crossing it several times. Eels inhabit the West Canungra Creek. They bite when threatened and injuries have occurred. Creek crossings may be difficult to navigate and the circuit might not be obvious in places. Take particular care at creek crossings, especially after rain. Check track conditions with a ranger before you leave. The circuit exits via the Box Forest circuit.

On overcast summer days, leaf-tailed geckos may be seen along this circuit. This gecko is endemic to the Gondwana Rainforests of Australia World Heritage Area. Fossilised ancestors of this species from over 20 million years ago have been found in the World Heritage-listed Australian Fossil Mammal sites (Riversleigh).

Class 4 walking track Toolona Creek circuit (Class 4)

Distance: 17.4 km return

Time: Allow about 6 hr walking time

Details: The Toolona Creek circuit branches from the Box Forest circuit near Elabana Falls, then continues beside Toolona Creek, up through a gorge, and past its headwaters to emerge on the Border Track near Wanungara lookout. The narrow Toolona Gorge creates a protected moist and shady refuge for many ancient flowering rainforest plants. The king fern Todea barbara is a relict of one of the oldest fern families, Osmundaceae, evolving even before Gondwana formed.

The return trip via the Border Track passes Mount Bithongabel. Many large clumps of Antarctic beech Nothofagus moorei trees are found in the area.

Class 4 walking track Albert River circuit (Class 4)

Distance: 21.8 km return

Time: Allow about 7 hr walking time

Details: This circuit leaves the Border Track 5 km from the trailhead and winds down to Echo Falls before following a branch of the Albert River upstream to Echo Point lookout. Panoramic views of Mount Wupawn to Mount Durigan the McPherson Range and south to the Tweed Range can be seen from here. These peaks are all part of the erosion caldera that surrounds Mount Warning, once a central volcanic plug. Traditional owners of the Bundjalang language group call this mighty plug 'Wollumbin' (Cloud-catcher).

The circuit continues east along the Queensland—New South Wales border and then turns north-west to connect with the Border Track. In September when the beech orchids Dendrobium falcorostrum are flowering, this circuit takes on a particular charm, with the delicate orchids contrasting with the massive trunks to which they cling.

Full-day walks accessible from both Binna Burra and Green Mountains sections

Class 4 walking track Border Track (Class 4)

Distance: 21.4 km return one way only

Time: Allow about 7 hr walking time

Details: The Border Track is the backbone of the Lamington walking track system, with most walks radiating from it. The track is also a section of the Gold Coast Hinterland Great Walk. This track connects the Binna Burra and Green Mountains sections of Lamington National Park, passing through warm and cool subtropical, and warm and cool temperate rainforest. These varied rainforest communities contain many ancient families of flowering plants: the bolwarra family Eupomatiacea, pepperbush Winteraceae, laurels Lauraceae, lillypillies Myrtaceae, and the southern beech Fagaceae.

On a clear day, lookouts provide spectacular views of the Limpinwood Valley, Mount Warning and the Tweed Range. During winter months, walkers are likely to hear the loud ringing call of the Albert's lyrebird.

There is no shorter way to walk from either trailhead in the park. Stay on the Border Track. Other routes may appear to reduce the distance, but end up being longer.

Class 4 walking track Mount Merino track (Class 4)

Distance: 21.6 km return from Binna Burra; 24 km return from Green Mountains

Time: Allow about 8 hr walking time

Details: Chakoonya lookout is about halfway along the Border Track between Binna Burra and Green Mountains (O'Reilly). A short sidetrack 10 km from Binna Burra leads to two lookouts; Beereenbano and Merino, with views over the Tweed and Limpinwood valleys. The track passes through areas of forest damaged during a severe storm in 1983.

Half-day walks in Binna Burra section

(Distances given are from the trailhead and return.)

Class 2 walking track Rainforest circuit (Class 2)

Distance: 1.2 km return

Time: Allow about 30 min walking time

Details: For a quick introduction to the 'typical' warm subtropical rainforest of Lamington, follow the Border Track for 500 m, then branch right on to the Rainforest circuit. Bowerbirds and catbirds are commonly heard. These are members of the oldest lineage of songbirds. A self-guiding brochure produced by the Lamington Natural History Association (LNHA Inc.) is available at the national park information centre and Binna Burra Mountain Lodge kiosk.

Class 4 walking track Bellbird lookout track (Class 4)

Distance: 2 km return

Time: Allow about 1 hr walking time

Details: This track branches off the Ships Stern circuit and descends through rainforest and open forest before emerging suddenly at Bellbird lookout—a natural lookout (with no handrails) above a very high, sheer cliff. Please keep children under close supervision and keep well away from the cliff edge.

The land around this lookout and most of the track is not part of the national park—it belongs to Binna Burra Mountain Lodge. For enquiries, please contact Binna Burra Mountain Lodge on (07) 5533 3622.

From here you get an excellent view of Ships Stern, Turtle Rock, Egg Rock (Kurraragin) and Numinbah Valley—all remnants of what millions of years of erosion, landslides and weathering have created.

Hoop pines Araucaria cunninghamii can be seen from the lookout, growing on the exposed northern slopes. Harvesting of hoop pine and red cedar Toona ciliata led to the initial European settlement and ultimately the clearing of Numinbah Valley for agriculture.

Class 4 walking track Caves circuit (Class 4)

Distance: 5 km return

Time: Allow about 1.5 hr walking time

Details: From the park's information centre, this interesting circuit winds up through open forest and rainforest to emerge on the road near the Binna Burra Mountain Lodge road entrance. Alternatively, begin this circuit from the Binna Burra Mountain Lodge road entrance and return via Binna Burra Road. Caution: this circuit contains unstable surfaces. Rockfalls may occur on the track and in Kweebani Cave. For your safety, avoid lingering near the cave—move along the circuit and view the cave from a safe distance.

The circuit provides excellent views into the Coomera Valley and passes a large red cedar and fine specimens of other rainforest tree species. The major cliff line opposite is of a flow of rhyolite and deposits of boulders and ash (tuff) can be seen in overhanging caves. Possibly the largest intact stand of hoop pine Araucaria cunninghamii in Australia can be seen along the Darlington Range.

White-throated treecreepers, members of one of the oldest groups of songbirds, are frequently seen on this circuit. Koalas are often seen in open forest areas along the walk. Take care when walking beside the bitumen road to return to the start of the circuit, especially on weekends when traffic is busy, or alternatively walk back along the circuit. A self-guiding brochure produced by the Lamington Natural History Association for this circuit is available at the national park's information centre, kiosk and Binna Burra Mountain Lodge.

Class 3 walking track Tullawallal circuit (Class 3)

Distance: 5 km return

Time: Allow about 1.5 hr walking time

Details: Visit the most accessible cool temperate rainforest in Lamington and the closest patch of this forest type to Binna Burra. From the trailhead follow take the Border Track for 1.9 km, then branch right at the track junction onto Tullawallal circuit and follow a short sidetrack to Tullawallal.

The pocket of Antarctic beech Nothofagus moorei on the summit is the northernmost location of this species in Australia and is one of our remaining links with the ancient forests of Gondwana. Nothofagus forests were once widespread across Australia and provided a habitat for many animals that have long since disappeared from our landscape.

From Tullawallal, return to the track junction, turn right and continue along the Loop track back to Binna Burra car park.

Class 4 walking track Gwongoorool track (Class 4)

Distance: 6 km return

Time: Allow about 2 hr walking time

Details: This track starts at the car park near the park information centre and descends a series of steep rock steps (approximately 200 in total) past cliffs of volcanic ash (tuff), through open forest and rainforest to Gwongoorool Pool on the Coomera River. The river is important habitat (as are all of Lamington's streams) for hylid frogs (tree frog family), freshwater crayfish, eels and eastern water dragons. Eels inhabit the Coomera River. They bite when threatened and injuries have occurred.

Return on the same track.

Full-day walks in Binna Burra section

(Distances given are from the trailhead and return.)

Class 4 walking track Lower Bellbird circuit (Class 4)

Distance: 12 km return

Time: Allow about 4 hr walking time

Details: This circuit branches off the Ships Stern circuit 3.7 km from the trailhead. The circuit passes through a patch of dry rainforest, regarded as an example of the rise of the 'dry adapted' flora now widespread in Australia. Follow the circuit below Bellbird lookout and emerge at a clearing, once a dairy farm. Continue the return circuit by walking beside the Binna Burra Road. Please note that choosing to return via the Caves circuit adds 1.6 km to the walk.

This track forms part of the Gold Coast Hinterland Great Walk, arrow markers indicate the route. If you are walking the Gold Coast Hinterland Great Walk please ensure you have a copy of the Gold Coast Hinterland Great Walk Topographic Map.

Class 4 walking track Daves Creek circuit (Class 4)

Distance: 12 km return

Time: Allow about 4 hr walking time

Details: To see a fascinating variety of forest and heath, branch off the Border Track 2.3 km from the trailhead and descend through the head of Kurraragin Valley out into Daves Creek country. The circuit passes through several distinctive vegetation types: warm and cool subtropical rainforest along the Border Track; warm temperate rainforest, containing many examples of ancient angiosperms such as coachwood Ceratopetalum apetalum, in Nixon Creek's headwaters; and wet sclerophyll forest with giant New England ash Eucalyptus campanulata, around the track intersection to the Ships Stern circuit.

Class 4 walking track Coomera circuit (Class 4)

Distance: 17.4 km return

Time: Allow about 7 hr walking time

Details: The scenic Coomera circuit leaves the Border Track 1.9 km from the trailhead and passes through subtropical and warm temperate rainforest communities, and giant brush box Lophostemon confertus forest. The gorge is 160 m deep. Views from the lookout platform, (5.5 km from the trailhead) provide dramatic evidence of the power of erosion, which has cut through a thick resistant rhyolite lava flow.

The circuit continues to ascend while following the edge of the Coomera Gorge. It crosses the river several times before rejoining the Border Track and returning to the Binna Burra car park. The river crossings involve stepping from rock to rock, which can be hazardous after heavy rain and should not be attempted when the river is in flood.

Class 4 walking track Mount Hobwee circuit (Class 4)

Distance: 18.2 km return

Time: Allow about 8 hr walking time

Details: After leaving the Border Track 5.4 km from Binna Burra, this circuit winds through rainforest to the summit of Mount Hobwee (1163 m). Much of the forest near the summit was disturbed by a severe storm in 1983.

The Nothofagus forest and associated communities found here and Mount Merino provide strong evidence of the Gondwana connection. The 'beech orange', a species of fungus, occurs only on Nothofagus species found in Australia and South America.

The circuit rejoins the Border Track for the return to the Binna Burra car park.

Class 4 walking track Araucaria lookout track (Class 4)

Distance: 17.8 km return

Time: Allow about 7 hr walking time

Details: The Araucaria lookout track leaves the Mount Hobwee circuit 900 m from the Border Track junction. The 2.6 km track passes Orchid Bower lookout and ends at Araucaria lookout—named after the hoop pines Araucaria cunninghamii, which can be viewed from the lookout. These hoop pine communities are a living representative of the Jurassic Age (the age of the conifers) about 180 million years ago.

Class 4 walking track Wagawn track (Class 4)

Distance: 18 km return

Time: Allow about 8 hr walking time

Details: This track also branches off the Mount Hobwee circuit, 2 km from the Border Track junction. Garragoolba lookout features uninterrupted views of Springbrook, the Tweed Valley and Mount Warning.

Only after naturally occurring events such as severe wildfires or storms are there uninterrupted views of Springbrook, the Tweed Valley and Mount Warning from Wagawn. In the interim years the view may be interrupted by natural regrowth. Please do not damage or remove vegetation as many of these plants are significant species in the Gondwana Rainforests of Australia World Heritage Area. Remember, all plants are protected by legislation.

Return to the Binna Burra car park along the same track.

Class 4 walking track Ships Stern circuit (Class 4)

Distance: 21 km return

Time: Allow about 8 hr walking time

Details: The circuit commences opposite the road entrance to Binna Burra Mountain Lodge. The circuit descends past the scenic Yangahla lookout and through a fine stand of piccabeen palm Archontophoenix cunninghamii to the valley floor. Red cedar Toona ciliatae and the majestic flooded gum Eucalyptus grandis also thrive here. A short side track (an additional 600 m one way) can be followed to the bottom of Ballunjui Falls.

The circuit then crosses Nixon Creek and ascends through Hidden Valley past Charraboomba Rock to the top of Ships Stern range and into open eucalypt forest. This is one of the few places within the park where scribbly gum Eucalyptus racemosa can be seen.

The circuit continues through rainforest and open forest, with another side track (an additional 1.3 km one way) providing access to Upper Ballunjui.

Continue past Nagarigoon back to Binna Burra. For the very energetic, Daves Creek circuit can be added to this walk, making it a total of 23 km.

 Illinbah circuit (Class 5)

This circuit requires a high degree of fitness and experience.

Distance: 16.6 km return

Time: Allow about 8 hr walking time

Details: To walk the Illinbah circuit clockwise, start at the car park near the park information centre and descend through rainforest and open forest to the Coomera River. The dry rainforest on the river's western side provides habitat for the black-breasted button-quail, a member of an ancient order of birds.

The circuit then follows the 'Old Cedar Road', once used by timber-getters in the early 1900s, crossing the Coomera River several times.

These crossings can be hazardous after heavy rain and should not be attempted when the river is in flood. The circuit then leaves the river and climbs the Beechmont Range to return to Binna Burra. Note: in hot weather it may be less strenuous to walk this circuit in an anticlockwise direction. Always carry enough drinking water.

Remote bushwalking

Lamington National Park offers some of the most spectacular remote area bushwalking opportunities in the Gold Coast hinterland. The extremely rugged mountain terrain can be hazardous for inexperienced or poorly prepared walkers. A high level of physical fitness and navigational skills are essential.

Walkers should familiarise themselves with the area before attempting an extended walk.

Contact us for assistance with route advice and other detailed information. Established bushwalking clubs with experienced off-track walkers regularly organise trips to Lamington National Park. Guidebooks covering most walks are available from specialist camping stores and some bookshops.

Remote area walking is only advised in the cooler weather, usually April to September. Walking during summer can be very hazardous due to high temperatures and lack of surface water.

All remote bushwalkers are expected to follow the minimal impact bushwalking and bush camping practices, such as observing proper sanitation and hygiene methods and avoiding polluting water in any way.

Guided tours and talks

Commercially operated tours are available within the park. For further information see the tourism information links.

The Connect with Nature program offers a range of nature-based activities and events every season for adults, children and families in and around parks and forests throughout Brisbane, Western Scenic Rim and Gold Coast and hinterland.

Picnic and day-use areas

The main picnic area at Green Mountains (O'Reilly) has toilets, tables and three electric barbecues. Lamington is popular for day visits, so expect crowded conditions in the picnic area during weekends and holiday seasons. Come prepared with your own seating and a fuel stove.

Binna Burra section has a small picnic area and toilet located near the national park's information centre, located on the right-hand side of the road just after the park entrance sign. A larger picnic area with toilets, tables and electric barbecue facilities is located at the end of the Binna Burra Road next to the main track entrance.

Day visitors must bring their own rubbish bags as no bins are provided in the day-use picnic areas and all rubbish (including food scraps and sanitary products) must be carried out of the park. Those using human waste disposal kits or portable chemical toilets are to dispose of their waste in appropriate facilities off the mountain. Please do not empty these wastes into the hybrid toilets located on the park.

Viewing wildlife

On the park's many walking tracks you can see subtropical rainforest, ancient Antarctic beech trees, hoop pines, eucalypt forest and montane heath and some of the area's incredible variety of wildlife.

Listen for the whip-cracking call of the eastern whipbird, and see the brilliant red and blue colours of the crimson rosella or the magnificent green and red of the Australian king-parrot. The regent bowerbird, with its brilliant black and gold colouring, is frequently seen foraging around rainforest trees for fruits, insects and spiders. The Albert's lyrebird is often encountered along the rainforest tracks in the cooler months. Listen for the male's extraordinary song, which incorporates imitations of sounds from nature and, sometimes, human activities.

Look out for shiny black land mullets, the largest known skink that is a harmless, thick-set, lizard. You may even be lucky to spy a carpet python basking in the sun.

In the picnic areas, red-necked pademelons are commonly seen early morning and late afternoon foraging on grass. Mountain brushtail possums (bobucks), with their dense black fur, are usually seen in rainforest trees at night.

  • For more details about Lamington's diverse wildlife, see the description of the park's natural environment.

Things to know before you go

Sturdy footwear can make all the difference to a day's walk. Photo: Robert Ashdown, Queensland Government.

Sturdy footwear can make all the difference to a day's walk. Photo: Robert Ashdown, Queensland Government.

Always display your camp site tag and booking number clearly on your tent or van. Photo: Adam Creed, Queensland Government.

Always display your camp site tag and booking number clearly on your tent or van. Photo: Adam Creed, Queensland Government.

Essentials to bring

Always be prepared, even on half-day walks, and use sound judgment while visiting and walking in Lamington National Park.

  • Take warm clothing and raincoats, as weather can change quickly at any time of the year.
  • Wear sensible footwear—boots or strong shoes.
  • Wear a hat and apply sunscreen to prevent sunburn.
  • Carry adequate drinking water, a fuel stove to boil creek water for drinking and/or chemical tables to treat creek water.
  • Take a torch and some extra food.
  • Always pack a first-aid kit and first-aid manual. Learn first-aid procedures.
  • Carry the park's guide that includes detailed walking track information (obtained from the park information centres).
  • Bring your camera and binoculars for viewing wildlife. A torch, preferably with a red filter to protect animals' eyes, is useful for spotlighting at night.

A topographic map and compass are essential for any off-track walking and a GPS, EPIRB (or PLB) are highly recommended, but know how to use them!

Day visitors must also bring their own rubbish bags as no bins are provided in the day-use or picnic areas and all rubbish (including food scraps and bagged sanitary products) must be carried out.

Opening hours

Lamington National Park is open 24 hours a day. The park’s two information centres are opened during the weekends pending availability of volunteers.

Green Mountains park office is open Monday to Friday from 8.00 am to 3.30 pm (park duties permitting). The information centre is opened during the weekends pending availability of volunteers.

Binna Burra park office is open Monday to Friday from 7.30 am to 4.00 pm (park duties permitting).

Permits and fees

All camping areas within Lamington National Park require a camping permit and fees apply.

Permits for Green Mountains campground must be booked in advance for all weekends and school holidays. A camp site tag with your booking number must be displayed at your camp site. Remember: camping fees must be lodged before camping overnight—fines apply for camping without a permit.

All remote bush camping sites must be booked online. All bush camping sites are closed between 1 December and 31 January the following year. For more details, see camping information page.

  • Book your Green Mountains camping area camp site online.
  • If you cannot book online, see camping bookings for other options.

Pets

Domestic animals are not permitted in Lamington National Park.

Climate and weather

Lamington is considered to be on average 5 °C cooler than Brisbane. Extreme winter temperatures can get below 0 °C. Frosts can occur.

The park receives an average of approximately 1600 mm of rainfall per year. The wet season is typically from November through to March.

Visitors familiar with Lamington National Park tend to appreciate walking in winter as the fine weather makes views less hazy, rain is usually minimal and leeches uncommon.

For more information see the tourism information links below.

Fuel and supplies

Fuel and supplies are available at Canungra and Nerang. No fuel is available on Lamington Plateau. For more information see the tourism information links below.

Frequently asked questions

For more information, please read the frequently asked questions.

Staying safe

Be prepared. Walk with friends, keep to the tracks and always carry water, torch, first-aid kit and a map. Photo: Robert Ashdown, Queensland Government.

Be prepared. Walk with friends, keep to the tracks and always carry water, torch, first-aid kit and a map. Photo: Robert Ashdown, Queensland Government.

Lamington National Park is a wild place with hidden dangers for the unwary visitor. It is vital to pay close attention to signs that warn of local dangers. Follow these tips and use common sense to stay safe in Lamington National Park.

Swimming

  • Spinal cord injuries such as quadriplegia and paraplegia are some of the serious results from either jumping or diving into creeks. People who have injured their spines through jumping or diving into water often drown.
  • Never dive or jump into the water as it may be shallow or hide submerged obstructions.
  • Help protect our natural waterways by not polluting the water or harming the aquatic wildlife with sunscreens, insect repellents, perfumes and personal hygiene products.
  • Disturbing or removing rocks and trampling creek bank vegetation can cause erosion and harm breeding sites for aquatic wildlife.

For more information on how to protect our natural waterways, see looking after the park.

Walking

  • Be prepared, even on short walks, and judge your ability and conditions carefully before setting out. Do not expect to be warned of every possible danger.
  • Before setting out on long walks, leave a copy of your bushwalking plans with a friend, relative, reliable person or place of accommodation. This person has the sole responsibility of contacting police if you are overdue. The plans should include:
    • your name, address, number of people in your party, ages and any medical conditions;
    • vehicle registration, make, model, colour and parking location;
    • the route you are taking, expected times of departure and return.
  • Remember that a search and rescue is costly, endangers people's lives and can damage the environment.
  • Leave plenty of time to reach your destination. Do not attempt long walks after midday.
  • Take care near cliff edges, at lookouts, on rocks and near waterfalls, especially in wet weather. Never stand on cliff edges while looking through a camera or binoculars. Many tracks have steep drop-offs beside them, so walk carefully. Keep children under close supervision—a steep drop-off may be just around the corner.
  • Keep to the walking tracks where provided and take care on rocks, as they may be slippery. If you leave the national park's walking track system you are fully responsible for your actions and safety.
  • Walk with a recognised bushwalking club. This is a good way to gain experience.
  • Walk with one or more friends. At least one member of each party should be a competent map-reader and bushwalker.
  • Learn map and compass skills. Recommended maps for bushwalking are 1:25 000 topographic maps. It is also advisable to carry a recognised bushwalking guidebook for the area.

Wildlife

  • Eels inhabit many of the park's pools and streams. Disturbing them by wading or sitting in these water bodies may result in a quick, sharp bite. Some bleeding may occur. Have a first-aid kit handy to treat the bite.
  • Check yourself and children daily for ticks, often found in body creases. Remove with tweezers and consult a first-aid book.
  • Leeches are common in wetter areas. Insect repellent on your socks helps keep them away. Remove them by pushing with your fingernail where they have attached. Some bleeding after removal is normal due to the anticoagulant in the leech bite, but there are usually no ill effects apart from an itchy bite-mark.
  • Stinging trees (recognisable by their very large, round leaves) can deliver an extremely painful sting—do not touch their leaves including dead ones.
  • Venomous snakes live in the park, so watch for snakes on the path, and wait for them to move away. Never pick up, disturb or try to kill a snake. Carry elastic bandages in case of snakebite, and know the correct first-aid procedure.

In an emergency

In case of accident or other emergency please:

  • call Triple Zero (000), if you have difficulty calling from your mobile phone, try 112
  • call 106 for a text-only message for deaf or speech or hearing impaired callers
  • advise your location and nature of the emergency
  • stay on the phone until you are told to hang up.

The nearest hospitals are located at Beaudesert, Robina and Southport on the Gold Coast. Mobile phone coverage is not reliable. Depending on your mobile phone provider you can often get a signal near lookouts.

For more information, please read the guidelines on safety in parks and forests.

Looking after the park

Remember to pack zip-lock bags so you can take your rubbish home. Photo: Adam Creed, Queensland Government.

Remember to pack zip-lock bags so you can take your rubbish home. Photo: Adam Creed, Queensland Government.

Prevent the spread of pathogens, clean walking boots and camping equipment before and after visiting Lamington National Park. Photo: Robert Ashdown, Queensland Government.

Prevent the spread of pathogens, clean walking boots and camping equipment before and after visiting Lamington National Park. Photo: Robert Ashdown, Queensland Government.

Use pathogen control stations at track entrances. Photo: Sergio Norambuena, Queensland Government.

Use pathogen control stations at track entrances. Photo: Sergio Norambuena, Queensland Government.

The natural beauty of Lamington National Park attracts thousands of people to the area, but high visitor numbers create many pressures. Litter, erosion caused by shortcutting tracks, damage to vegetation and disturbance to wildlife all threaten nature's delicate existence.

You can help protect the park by:

Guidelines

  • please leave all plants and animals undisturbed
  • please do not feed the wildlife. Feeding native animals may cause poor health and sometimes death.
  • use toilets if available. Away from toilets, take care with sanitation and hygiene and don't pollute natural water supplies. Ensure all faecal matter and toilet paper is properly buried (15 cm deep) well away from tracks, camp sites and 100 m from all watercourses and drainage channels (carry a small trowel for this purpose). Bag and carry out disposable nappies and sanitary products.
  • wash away from streams, gullies and watercourses, as all detergents, soaps, sunscreens and toothpastes pollute water and damage aquatic life.
  • take your rubbish home. Minimal impact bushwalkers take great care to avoid leaving any rubbish. Remember—pack it in, pack it out. This includes all food scraps, scraps of foil, sweet’s wrappers and cigarette butts.
  • keep to the walking tracks where provided, don't shortcut, and take care near cliff edges.

Fuel stoves only

No open fires are allowed in the park; fuel stoves must be used. This is because of;

  • the possibility of pathogens, fire ants and cane toadlets being bought into the park from introduced firewood
  • the importance of fallen and dead timber (as homes for insects, reptiles and small mammals and in returning nutrients to the soil)
  • the danger of starting wildfires
  • damage caused by people trampling as they gather wood.

Pathogens

Stop the spread of pathogens (disease producing organisms such as phytophthora (PDF)*myrtle rust and amphibian chytrid fungus). Soil and detritus can contain pathogens such as fungal spores that are harmful to the forest and frogs.

  • Keep to designated roads and walking tracks at all times.
  • Start and finish you bushwalk with clean footwear and camping gear by removing soil from footwear, camping spade or trowel and tent pegs before leaving an area and keep all gear as clean and free from soil as possible during the walk.
  • Please clean and disinfect your footwear and camping equipment using a disinfectant either at home or before visiting the park. Use pathogen control stations located at track entrances in the park.
  • Watch the Stop the spread of weeds and pathogens web clip for more information.

Please refer to the Green Mountains and Binna Burra section maps for locations of these pathogen control stations.

Be frog friendly

Lamington's waterways provide important habitats for a number of endangered or vulnerable species, particularly frogs. Please help protect these sensitive habitats by following the guidelines below.

  • Please do not disturb, handle or remove frogs, their eggs or tadpoles.
  • Do not use or discard, soap, detergent, shampoo, sunscreen, insect repellent or any other potential pollutant in creeks or along the banks.
  • Keep to walking tracks and cross directly where the track crosses the creek.
  • Please do not disturb or remove rocks or trample vegetation in or directly adjacent to creeks.

See the guidelines on caring for parks for more information about protecting our environment and heritage in parks.

Park management

Discover the story in stone that is Lamington National Park's unique history. Photo: Robert Ashdown, Queensland Government.

Discover the story in stone that is Lamington National Park's unique history. Photo: Robert Ashdown, Queensland Government.

Lamington National Park is a reserve of international significance and is managed by the Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service (QPWS) under the Nature Conservation Act 1992 to preserve and present its remarkable natural and cultural values in perpetuity.

Lamington's outstanding geological history, evolutionary significance and role in nature conservation are recognised through its inclusion in the World Heritage listed Gondwana Rainforests of Australia. Management is in accordance with internationally recognised obligations under the World Heritage Convention.

Lamington National Park Management Plan (PDF, 1.0M)* was approved by the Governor in Council on the 6 October 2011. Contact us for copies of the approved management plan.

Tourism information links

Beaudesert Community Arts and Information Centre

www.visitscenicrim.com.au

Westerman Park, Cnr Mt Lindesay Highway and Enterprise Drive, Beaudesert Q 4285
ph 1300 881 164
email tourism@scenicrim.com.au

For tourism information for all regions in Queensland see www.queenslandholidays.com.au.

Further information

Contact us

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Last updated
10 June 2014