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About Moogerah Peaks

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Getting there and getting around

Looking west towards Main Range from Mount French. Photo: R. Ashdown, Queensland Government.

Looking west towards Main Range from Mount French. Photo: R. Ashdown, Queensland Government.

These peaks are all near Lake Moogerah and accessible from the Cunningham Highway about 100 km from Brisbane.

Mount French is 9 km west of the sign-posted turnoff just south of Boonah. Mount Edwards is east of the Cunningham Highway 9 km south of Aratula. Mount Greville is 25 km south-west of Boonah via the Mt Alford Road or 11 km south of Lake Moogerah.

Mount Moon is surrounded by private property and access must be arranged with the respective landholders. Please contact us for more details.

Wheelchair accessibility

Wheelchair access is possible only at Mount French section. The North cliff track (720 m return), which provides panoramic views over the Fassifern Valley, is suitable for wheelchairs with assistance.

Park features

The ancient volcanic peaks stand like sentinels in the rural landscape. Photo: Andrew Sampson, Queensland Government.

The ancient volcanic peaks stand like sentinels in the rural landscape. Photo: Andrew Sampson, Queensland Government.

The ancient, volcanic peaks of mounts French, Greville, Moon and Edwards are recognised not only for their unique shapes and as favourite bushwalking destinations, but also as remnant habitats of key conservation value within south-east Queensland.

The peaks are mostly covered in open eucalypt forest with montane heath on the exposed rock faces and rainforest in some sheltered areas.

Before land clearing, much of the Fassifern Valley was covered by brigalow and vine forest, known as the 'Fassifern scrub'. Now only a very small remnant of this vegetation type remains, and is protected within the Mount French section of the park.

These peaks are special places to Aboriginal people, bushwalkers and naturalists alike. If you come to Moogerah Peaks National Park be well prepared and to treat the bush with care and respect.

Camping and accommodation

Frog Buttress is the only campground in Moogerah Peaks National Park. Photo: R. Ashdown, Queensland Government.

Frog Buttress is the only campground in Moogerah Peaks National Park. Photo: R. Ashdown, Queensland Government.

Camping

There is limited camping available within Moogerah Peaks National Park, with Mount French section providing the only camping area. This camping area is not suitable for caravans. Camping permits are required and fees apply. As the camping area is small, advance bookings are necessary. The number of camping permits issued is limited to help protect the park from degradation.

Read Things to know before you go for information about essentials to bring with you when camping in Moogerah Peaks National Park.

Other accommodation

There are several privately-run camping reserves, lodges and bed and breakfasts located within a short distance of Moogerah Peaks National Park. Hotel, motel and caravan park accommodation is available at Boonah, Aratula and a council caravan park at Lake Moogerah. For more information see the tourism information links below.

Things to do

Enjoy a leisurely stroll along one of the walking tracks at Mount French section. Photo: R. Ashdown, Queensland Government.

Enjoy a leisurely stroll along one of the walking tracks at Mount French section. Photo: R. Ashdown, Queensland Government.

Walking

There are two short walking tracks in Mount French section. The other sections of the park have a number of rough bush tracks of varying difficulty, which are best suited to experienced bushwalkers only. Less experienced walkers should walk with an experienced person and take food and water.

Leave a copy of your bushwalking plans with a friend, relative or other reliable person. For your own comfort and safety, be aware of weather conditions. Suitable footwear and clothing are essential. Be aware that mobile phones work intermittently in these areas.

To make the most of your park visit, please read the section on staying safe.

Allow 15 to 20 min to walk 1 km. This time is calculated for people of average fitness and bushwalking experience and who are wearing correct footwear. If you are walking with small children or are a less experienced bushwalker, allow more time to return to your starting point.

Distances given are from the track entrance and return.

Key to track standards

The classification system is based on Australian Standards. Please note that while each track is classified according to its most difficult section, other sections may be of an easier level.

Class 1 walking track Class 1 track (Australian Standards)
  • Wheelchair access track with handrails at lookout.
Class 3 walking track Class 3 track (Australian Standards)
  • Gently sloping, well-defined track with some exposed roots and rocks.
  • Caution required near unfenced cliff edges and naturally occurring lookouts.
  • Reasonable level of fitness required and ankle-supporting footwear recommended.
Class 4 walking track Class 4 track (Australian Standards)
  • Rough distinct tracks with exposed roots and rocks with steep grades and extensive steps.
  • May be extensively overgrown; hazards such as fallen trees and rockfalls likely to be present.
  • Caution at creek crossings, unfenced cliff edges and naturally occurring lookouts.
  • Moderate fitness level and ankle-supporting footwear strongly recommended.
Class 5 walking track Class 5 track (Australian Standards)
  • These trails are not constructed or maintained by Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service (QPWS), National Parks, Sport and Racing (NPSR).
  • No signs or markers are provided, except where necessary to minimise environmental damage. Depending on usage levels trails may range from clearly visible footpads to indistinct, overgrown routes.
  • Trails may range from clearly visible footpads to indistinct, overgrown routes depending on usage levels.
  • Muddy sections, steep grades and numerous hazards such as fallen trees and rockfalls are highly likely to be encountered.
  • Caution required—no safety fences, bridges or other structures provided.
  • Highly developed navigational skills and relevant topographic maps essential.
  • High fitness level and extensive off-track walking experience and ankle-supporting footwear essential.

Walking tracks at a glance

Matching experience and expectations—to make your planning easier, simply match your expectations and experience with the most suitable track or trail.

Track name Classification Distance return Walking time
North cliff track

Class 1 Class 1 walking track

720 m 15 min
Mee-bor-rum circuit Class 3 Class 3 walking track 840 m 25 min
Mount Edwards summit Class 5 Class 5 walking track measured in time only 3.5 hr
Mount Greville summit Class 5 Class 5 walking track measured in time only 4 hr
Mount Moon summit Class 5 Class 5 walking track measured in time only 8 hr

Mount French section

This section encompasses the north peak—Mee-bor-rum (468 m) and south peaks— Punchargin (598 m) of Mount French. Access to the south peak (Punchargin) is restricted by private property. On the north peak (Mee-bor-rum) two short tracks make it easy for you to explore the park's many features and neither requires previous bushwalking experience. Sections of these tracks are suitable for wheelchairs with assistance.

Class 1 walking track North cliff track (Class 1)

Distance: 720 m

Time: Allow about 15 min walking time

Details: This track leads to Logans lookout with excellent, panoramic views over the Fassifern Valley, with the Main Range escarpment to the west and Flinders Peak and beyond to the east. North Cliff track is suitable for wheelchairs with assistance.

Class 3 walking track Mee-bor-rum circuit (Class 3)

Distance: 840 m

Time: Allow about 25 min walking time

Details: This circuit track passes through heathland and features the East cliff lookout with views of Tamborine, Lamington and Mount Barney. Care must be taken at the lookout as it is a natural feature and has no handrails. Further along the track a circular platform with seating provides views of the heathland and the southern section of Mount French.

Wheelchair access with assistance on this track is only possible to the East cliff lookout. Beyond here the track through the heathland is rough and uneven.

Mount Edwards section

The steep, forested slopes of Mount Edwards (634 m) and adjacent Little Mount Edwards (363 m) are separated by Reynolds Creek, which flows between the two mountains through a gorge of sloping rock layers.

Class 5 walking track Mount Edwards summit (Class 5)

Distance: Measured in time only

Time: Allow about 3.5 hr walking time

Details: Mount Edwards is accessible from the Lake Moogerah picnic area at the end of Moogerah Connection Road. From the picnic area walk across the dam wall to the park entrance. This walk is suitable for experienced walkers only and requires a reasonable level of fitness. There are no formed tracks, signs or facilities so you must be self-reliant.

Please be aware that the hours of access are between 6 am to 6 pm. The dam wall access gate is locked outside these hours.

Warning! There are sheer cliffs and slippery rocks particularly after rain. One slip could be fatal—serious injury or death may result from walking near the cliff edge. Keep to the track—supervise children closely.

Mount Greville section

This small, rugged section of the park takes in the peak and slopes of Mount Greville (767 m), which rises sharply above the surrounding hilly country. With its rocky faces and forested ridges, this mountain creates an attractive landmark. Two deep, narrow, steep-sided gorges, known as Palm Gorge and Waterfall Gorge, cut into its south-eastern side. This section of the park is surrounded by private property; please keep to designated trails within the park.

Class 5 walking track Mount Greville summit (Class 5)

Distance: Measured in time only

Time: Allow about 5 hr return walking time

Details: Mount Greville's scree-clad gorges with palm-dominated rainforest provide access to the summit from the south-east. This walk is suitable only for experienced walkers. There are no tracks, signs or facilities so you must be self-reliant.

Warning! There are sheer cliffs and slippery rocks particularly after rain. One slip could be fatal—serious injury or death may result from walking near the cliff edge. Keep to the track—supervise children closely.

Mount Moon section

Characterised by two rocky mountain peaks, the highest being 784 m, Mount Moon section features several steep-walled gorges split by a huge crevice. Other features include exposed, sheer rock faces and jagged rocky crags. The dominant vegetation type is open eucalypt forest.

Class 5 walking track Mount Moon summit (Class 5)

Distance: Measured in time only

Time: Allow about 8 hr return walking time

Details: Mount Moon appeals only to the most ardent bushwalker as there are scree slopes and steep cliffs. Access to this section of the park is subject to permission to traverse private property. Please contact us for access details.

Roped sports (rockclimbing)

Mount French has one of the most popular and well-known rockclimbing locations in South East Queensland, known locally as ‘Frogs Buttress’. Abseiling and rockclimbing is for experienced, suitably-equipped climbers only and those under their direct supervision.

  • Assess the site for hazards and suitability for your experience and skill level.
  • Do not interfere with fixed equipment on the cliff or anchor to trees.
  • Wear a helmet, harness and appropriate footwear and clothing. Use ropes and protective equipment designed for climbing and abseiling.
  • Carry emergency communication equipment and a first-aid kit.
  • Tell a responsible person where and when you plan to climb.
  • Check weather conditions.
  • Look out for climbers below.
  • Never climb alone.
  • Allow enough time to climb in daylight hours.
  • It is an offence to install your own anchor points.

When rock climbing, minimise vegetation disturbance to protect the area from erosion and the introduction of pest plant species.

Picnic and day-use areas

Mount French is the only section of Moogerah Peaks National Park with a picnic area. Picnic tables, barbecues, toilets and water are provided and set amongst open eucalypt forest. Firewood is a limited resource and expensive to source—please supply your own for barbecue cooking or use a fuel stove. Firewood must not be collected from the park or roadside—fines apply. Visitors are asked to take their rubbish away with them.

Visitors must be self-sufficient when walking in all other sections of Moogerah Peaks National Park.

Lake Moogerah, managed by Seqwater, caters for water-based recreational activities and has picnic facilities with toilets. For details on activities, see Seqwater (PDF).

Viewing wildlife

Moogerah Peaks National Park provides the only significant refuge for some of the area's threatened and vulnerable wildlife. Inappropriate fire, clearing, logging and farming has meant that some habitats only survive on the peaks, gorges, cliff lines and rocky ridges of the national park. The last remnant stand of the once widespread 'Fassifern scrub', dominated by the dry rainforest tree, brigalow Acacia harpophylla, is now confined to Mount French.

There are six significant flora species within the park, some vulnerable to extinction, such as the vulnerable slender milkvine Marsdenia coronata and two species of lichen.

See the description of the park's natural environment for more details about Moogerah Peaks' diverse wildlife.

Guided tours and talks

The Connect with Nature program offers a range of nature-based activities and events every season for adults, children and families in and around parks and forests throughout Brisbane, Western Scenic Rim and Gold Coast and hinterland.

Things to know before you go

If you are only visiting for the day, remember to pack a lunch, drinking water, hat and sunscreen. Photo: R. Ashdown, Queensland Government.

If you are only visiting for the day, remember to pack a lunch, drinking water, hat and sunscreen. Photo: R. Ashdown, Queensland Government.

Essentials to bring

Be prepared and use sound judgment while visiting and walking in Moogerah Peaks National Park.

  • Carry sufficient food, water and protective clothing. Weather conditions can be changeable.
  • Wear a hat and apply sunscreen to prevent sunburn.
  • A first-aid kit and torch should be carried. Learn first aid procedures.
  • Rubbish bins are not provided. Please bring rubbish bags and take all recyclables and rubbish with you when you leave.
  • Limited firewood is supplied for barbecue cooking—it is expensive and difficult to source. To avoid disappointment, please supply your own firewood or use a fuel stove. Preferably use fuel or gas stoves, but if you do wish to use the barbecues provided, please bring your own wood or purchase it locally. The nearest supplier is located in Boonah. Never collect wood from the park or roadside—fines apply. Take care with fire, keep your fires below the grate and make sure your fire is out before you leave it, especially during hot or windy conditions.
  • Bring your camera and binoculars for viewing wildlife. A torch, preferably with a red filter to protect animals' eyes, is useful for spotlighting at night.

Essential to know

Mount Moon within Moogerah Peaks National Park is accessed through private property. The fire trail surrounding Mount Greville is private property and is not a walking track; access prohibited. Please contact us for more details when planning your walk.

Please respect private property and stay on designated routes.

  • Leave gates as you find them.
  • Do not litter, disturb stock or damage fences.
  • Do not light fires or camp on private property without the owner’s permission.
  • Obtain the owner’s permission before crossing or entering any private land away from the tracks.

Opening hours

Moogerah Peak National Park is open 24 hours a day. For your safety, walk in daylight hours only.

Permits and fees

There is limited camping available in Moogerah Peaks National Park—the only camping area is located in the Mount French section. To camp in the national park a permit is required. As the campsite is small, advanced bookings are necessary. Fees apply.

If you wish to extend your stay, you must re-book. A camp site tag with your booking number must be displayed at your camp site. Remember: camping sites must be booked before camping overnight—fines apply for camping without a permit.

Pets

Domestic animals are not permitted in Moogerah Peaks National Park.

Climate and weather

The Moogerah Peaks are usually hotter and colder than the average Brisbane temperatures, especially on the ridges and peaks. Winters are usually dry and cold with frosty nights, temperatures dropping to an average minimum of 5 °C. Summers are warm to very hot, especially on the exposed ridges, reaching to 40 °C. Watch out for late spring and summer thunderstorms, which bring lightning. Most rain falls between November and March. Weather forecasts are available from the Bureau of Meteorology.

For more information see the tourism information links below.

Fuel and supplies

Boonah, Kalbar and Aratula are all within an easy drive of all the peaks. For more information see the tourism information links below.

Staying safe

Wear study shoes. Photo: Adam Creed, Queensland Government.

Wear study shoes. Photo: Adam Creed, Queensland Government.

Be prepared, even on short walks, and judge your ability and conditions carefully before setting out.

To enjoy a safe visit to this area, please:

  • Choose walks that suit the capabilities of your entire group.
  • Stay together and keep to the walking tracks. If you leave the track system maintained by park staff you are fully responsible for your actions and safety.
  • Always supervise children.
  • Take care near cliff edges—they can be deceptive and are often closer than you think. Please keep away from the edge and supervise children at all times. Take extra care when using binoculars or cameras at these sites!
  • Wear a hat, sunscreen, comfortable clothes and sturdy shoes with good grip.
  • Take a basic first-aid kit.
  • Always carry drinking water.
  • Leave a copy of your bushwalking plans with a friend, relative or other reliable person. This person has responsibility for contacting police if you are overdue. Your plan should include:
    • your name, address, number of people in your party, ages and any medical conditions
    • vehicle registration, make, model, colour and parking location
    • the route you are taking, expected times of departure and return.
    • Remember that a search and rescue is costly and can endanger people's lives.

  • Walk with a recognised bushwalking club. This is a good way to gain experience.
  • Walk with one or more friends. At least one member of each party should be a competent map-reader and bushwalker.
  • Learn map and compass skills. Recommended maps for bushwalking are 1:25 000 topographic maps. It is also advisable to carry a recognised bushwalking guidebook for the area.

Theft from vehicles

Thefts have occurred in this park. Car crime is a problem even here. Help us to STOP this problem.

  • Remove your keys
  • Remove all valuables—including garage remotes.
  • Lock your car

In an emergency

In case of accident or other emergency:

  • call Triple Zero (000) or if you have difficulty connecting from your mobile phone, try 112
  • call 106 for a text-only message for deaf or speech or hearing impaired callers
  • advise the nature of the emergency and your location
  • stay on the phone until you are told to hang up.

The nearest hospital is located at Boonah. Mobile phone coverage is not reliable in parts of Moogerah Peaks National Park, but may be possible in areas with high elevation.

For more information, please read the guidelines on safety in parks and forests.

Looking after the park

Seek advice before walking in the more remote locations of the park. Photo: R. Ashdown, Queensland Government.

Seek advice before walking in the more remote locations of the park. Photo: R. Ashdown, Queensland Government.

Start and finish your walk with clean footwear. Use the pathogen control stations at the track entrances. Photo: Justin O'Connell, Queensland Government.

Start and finish your walk with clean footwear. Use the pathogen control stations at the track entrances. Photo: Justin O'Connell, Queensland Government.

You can help protect the park by observing these guidelines:

  • Please leave all plants and animals undisturbed.
  • Please do not feed wildlife. Feeding native animals may cause poor health and sometimes death.
  • Use toilets if available. Away from toilets, ensure all human waste and toilet paper is properly buried—at least 15 cm deep and at least 100 m away from tracks, campsites, watercourses and drainage channels. Take disposable nappies and sanitary products home with you for disposal.
  • Take your rubbish home. Minimal impact bushwalkers take great care to avoid leaving any rubbish. Remember—pack it in, pack it out.
  • Be self-sufficient—use a fuel stove.
  • Keep to the walking tracks where provided don't shortcut and take care near cliff edges.

Pathogens

Stop the spread of pathogens (disease producing organisms such as phytophthora, myrtle rust and amphibian chytrid fungus). Soil and detritus can contain pathogens such as fungal spores that are harmful to the forest and frogs.

  • Keep to designated roads and walking tracks at all times.
  • Start and finish your bushwalk with clean footwear by removing soil before leaving an area and keep all gear as clean and free from soil as possible during the walk.
  • Footwear hygiene stations are provided at the entrance to the walking tracks at
  • Mount French and Mount Greville sections of Moogerah Peaks National Park. 
  • Please clean and disinfect camping equipment using a disinfectant either at home or before visiting the park.
  • Watch the Stop the spread of weeds and pathogens web clip for more information.

See the guidelines on caring for parks for more information about protecting our environment and heritage in parks.

Park management

Acacia brunoides. Photo: Justin O'Connell, Queensland Government.

Acacia brunoides. Photo: Justin O'Connell, Queensland Government.

The Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service (QPWS) manages Moogerah Peaks National Park under the Nature Conservation Act 1992 to preserve and present its remarkable natural and cultural values in perpetuity.

A management plan for Moogerah Peaks National Park will be prepared in the future.

Tourism information links

Boonah Visitor Information Centre
www.boonahtourism.org.au and www.visitscenicrim.com.au    
Bicentennial Park, 20 Boonah–Fassifern Road, Boonah Q 4310
ph (07) 5463 2233
email boonahvic@scenicrimtourism.org.au 

For tourism information for all regions in Queensland see Queensland Holidays or local Tour Operators.

Further information

Contact us

Last updated
14 April 2016