Skip links and keyboard navigation

About Naree Budjong Djara

Park alerts

No current alerts for this park. See alerts for all parks.

Getting there and getting around

Catch a ferry over to Minjerribah to visit Naree Budjong Djara National Park. Photo: Queensland Government.

Catch a ferry over to Minjerribah to visit Naree Budjong Djara National Park. Photo: Queensland Government.

Vehicle ferries and water taxi link Cleveland and Redland Bay with Dunwich, on Minjerribah (North Stradbroke Island). The journey by water taxi takes 25 minutes; the ferry takes about 50 minutes.

Once on the island, visitors with their own transport can access the three townships of Dunwich, Amity and Point Lookout, and most sightseeing attractions via sealed roads. Visitors without a car can get around by using the public bus service, which meets the ferries and water taxis, or the local taxi service. For more information, refer to the tourism information links.

The currently accessible section of Naree Budjong Djara National Park (Blue Lake section) is on the east side, half way down the island. From Dunwich, follow Alfred Martin Way (sealed) south-east for 9 km up and over the hills and past the Brown Lake turn-off to reach the Blue Lake section of Naree Budjong Djara National Park.

Vehicle access to sand dunes in the park is prohibited. A car park is located at the entrance to the Blue Lake section of the national park.

Wheelchair accessibility

There are no wheelchair-accessible facilities or tracks in the national park.

Park features

Minjerribah is a favourite getaway for couples. Photo courtesy of Tourism and Events Queensland.

Minjerribah is a favourite getaway for couples. Photo courtesy of Tourism and Events Queensland.

Naree Budjong Djara National Park protects habitat that is home to the near threatened Cooloola sedgefrog. Photo: Queensland Government.

Naree Budjong Djara National Park protects habitat that is home to the near threatened Cooloola sedgefrog. Photo: Queensland Government.

Minjerribah has a rich cultural heritage, outstanding conservation values, and is a favourite getaway for couples, families and adventure seekers alike. Currently about 50 per cent of the island is protected as Naree Budjong Djara National Park.

Naree Budjong Djara means ‘My Mother Earth’ to the island’s Traditional Owners—the Quandamooka people. Their relationship with the island dates back thousands of years and their connection to land, sea and country is still as strong today. Naree Budjong Djara National Park is jointly managed by the Quandamooka people and the Department of National Parks, Sport and Racing (NPSR).

Naree Budjong Djara National Park features places of incredible conservation value and a variety of special habitats, including endangered heathlands, freshwater lakes and woodlands. These habitats are home to threatened animal species including the Cooloola sedgefrog Litoria cooloolensis and the black-necked stork Ephippiorhynchus asiaticus and the endangered swift parrot Lathamus discolor.

Camping and accommodation

Surfing is a popular recreational activity in the waters surrounding the island. Camp on the beach, then enjoy a morning surf. Photo: Queensland Government.

Surfing is a popular recreational activity in the waters surrounding the island. Camp on the beach, then enjoy a morning surf. Photo: Queensland Government.

Camping

Camping is not currently permitted in Naree Budjong Djara National Park.

There are a number of camping areas on Minjerribah, outside the national park (see North Stradbroke Island map (PDF, 563K)). These camping areas offer a range of facilities, including cabins, powered and unpowered sites, toilets, showers and playgrounds. For a more rugged experience, there is remote beach camping with no facilities; however, these areas can only be accessed by 4WD vehicles. Camping permits are required for all camping areas and a vehicle access permit is required to access these areas. See the tourism information links for more information.

Other accommodation

Private accommodation, including luxury resort accommodation with spa treatments, holiday units, holiday homes, bed and breakfasts, beach shacks and backpackers, is available at Dunwich, Amity and Point Lookout. For more information, see the tourism information links.

Things to do

Enjoy views over the Pacific Ocean from the Neembeeba 'to see' lookout in Naree Budjong Djara National Park. Photo: Queensland Government.

Enjoy views over the Pacific Ocean from the Neembeeba 'to see' lookout in Naree Budjong Djara National Park. Photo: Queensland Government.

Take an easy walk to Blue Lake viewing platform along the Karboora 'deep silent pool' track in Naree Budjong Djara National Park. Photo: Queensland Government.

Take an easy walk to Blue Lake viewing platform along the Karboora 'deep silent pool' track in Naree Budjong Djara National Park. Photo: Queensland Government.

The Gorge Walk at Point Lookout is a must do for all visitors to Minjerribah. Photo: Queensland Government.

The Gorge Walk at Point Lookout is a must do for all visitors to Minjerribah. Photo: Queensland Government.

Beach fishing is a popular recreational activity. Photo: Queensland Government.

Beach fishing is a popular recreational activity. Photo: Queensland Government.

Cycling is a great way to get around and see the sites of Minjerribah. Photo: Queensland Government.

Cycling is a great way to get around and see the sites of Minjerribah. Photo: Queensland Government.

Walking

There are two walking tracks within the Blue Lake section of Naree Budjong Djara National Park. Both tracks leave from the Blue Lake car park, about 9 km from Dunwich along Alfred Martin Way.

Neembeeba (meaning ‘to see’) lookout track—6 km return (1.5–2.5 hr) Grade: moderate

Taking the first turn to the left from the car park, the track winds uphill through coastal wallum woodland to a sandy ridge where the ocean can be glimpsed through the trees. The vegetation is more stunted here with distinctive scribbly gums. The lookout provides magnificent views over the southern part of Minjerribah, the Pacific Ocean and the Gold Coast. The track is a gradual climb and sandy in places. In summer it can be arduous and hot.

Karboora (meaning ‘deep silent pool’) track—5.2 km return (1.5–2 hr) Grade: easy

The walk to Karboora (also known as Blue Lake) passes through wallum woodlands with stunted eucalypt trees, wallum banksias and a heath understorey. The edges of the lake are thickly vegetated with eucalypts, banksias and sedges, making it a haven for birds such as honeyeaters and lorikeets. The lake supports waterbirds, such as grebes and ducks, as well as several species of native freshwater fish including rainbowfish and gudgeons. Fortunate visitors may catch sight of a golden wallaby Wallabia bicolor—a form of swamp wallaby found only on Peel Island and North and South Stradbroke islands—or, on overcast days, hear the call of the near threatened Cooloola sedgefrog Litoria coolooensis. This walk is an easy grade; however, the path is loose sand and can be hot in summer.

Karboora ‘deep silent pool’ is a place of significant cultural value to the Quandamooka people and they request that visitors respect that significance by not swimming in the lake. See nature, culture and history for more information.

Walking opportunities outside the national park

Gorge walk

The Gorge walk at Point Lookout is a must for all visitors to the island. This gentle walk offers outstanding views across the ocean and is an ideal vantage point for spotting marine life, such as turtles, dolphins and manta rays. From June to November, visitors can delight in watching humpback whales pass close to the coastline on their annual migration. The Gorge walk also offers stunning views along beautiful Main Beach to Jumpinpin, the island’s southern tip.

Brown Lake

Brown Lake is only 3.5 km from Dunwich and accessed via Alfred Martin Way. There are barbecue and picnic facilities, making it a great place to relax with the family. Brown Lake is a perched lake containing tannin-stained water from the leaves of surrounding paperbarks and tea trees, as well as the organic matter on its floor. Outdoor activities at Brown Lake include walking around the lake on fire tracks, bird watching and viewing or photographing wildflowers.

Swimming and surfing

The island is a haven for swimmers, body boarders and surfers.

Dunwich and Amity both have enclosed swimming areas making them ideal for families with young children. Do not swim in the deep channel out from Amity due to strong currents and the possible presence of sharks.

Flinders Beach is accessed by four-wheel drive from Amity or Point Lookout and offers excellent foreshore camping and swimming. The headland at Adder Rock often provides a point break for surfers.

Home Rock separates Home Beach and Cylinder Beach. Four-wheel-driving is not permitted on Home Beach, which makes it a perfect spot to relax away from the crowds.

Cylinder Beach is a very popular, sheltered beach with a well serviced camping area. It has a lovely calm inshore area perfect for families and is also well known for its point break off the headland, ideal for surfers and body boarders.

Main Beach stretches from Point Lookout to the remote southern tip of the island. The patrolled area at Point Lookout is the most popular swimming beach on the island and with southerly winds it is also a favourite with surfers and body boarders. Rips and side currents are a possibility, so swimmers should always stay between the flags.

Visit the Surf Life Saving Beach Safe website for patrolled beaches and local conditions.

Boating and fishing

Boating and fishing are prohibited in Naree Budjong Djara National Park but both of these activities are popular in the marine waters of Moreton Bay Marine Park surrounding Minjerribah.

There are public boat ramps at One Mile (near Dunwich) and Amity, which provides access to the calm waters of the channel between North Stradbroke and Moreton islands.

The deep, clear Rainbow Channel runs just off the shore, making Amity an ideal spot for launching boats or casting straight into deep water from the beach or jetty.

Beach fishing is a very popular past-time with visitors to the island, particularly off the popular foreshore camping areas of Flinders Beach and Main Beach.

Five marine national park (green) zones of the Moreton Bay Marine Park (PDF, 2.8M) lie along the coastline of Minjerribah. All forms of collecting, including fishing, are prohibited in these areas. Refer to the Moreton Bay Marine Park user guide (PDF, 11M) for boundaries and restrictions relating to zones and designated areas.

Fish right

  • Keep fish, bait and burley in sealed containers away from wildlife.
  • Bury fish remains and unused bait just below high tide mark. Dig a deep hole and cover scraps with at least 50 cm of sand.
  • Dispose of used bait bags and unwanted fishing line in bins or take them home.
  • All freshwater fish are protected on the island.
  • Fishing or collecting bait in lakes and streams is not permitted.

Guided tours

Minjerribah is an outdoor enthusiast’s paradise and there are a number of commercial tours on offer. Discover natural wonders off the beaten track on a four-wheel drive tour; catch dinner on a fishing tour; explore the waters surrounding the island on a sea kayaking tour; reveal underwater secrets on a diving or snorkelling tour and learn to surf at a local surf school. For more information, refer to tourism information links.

Picnic and day-use areas

There are currently no day-use or picnic areas in Naree Budjong Djara National Park.

Council provided barbecue and picnic facilities including a children’s playground is located near Brown Lake just 3.5km from Dunwich.

Viewing wildlife

The best time to view wildlife is in the early morning and late afternoon.

Other things to do

The two walking tracks in the Blue Lake section of Naree Budjong Djara National Park are the only recreational facilities currently provided in the national park. However, there are a number of recreational opportunities available on Minjerribah.

Enjoy birdwatching, go body boarding or surfing off one of the many beaches, hire a bicycle or a boat, play a round of golf, try your luck with a fishing rod, join a guided tour or go for a walk. See the tourism information links for more recreational opportunities available on Minjerribah.

Things to know before you go

To help protect native wildlife, such as the genetically distinct population of koalas, domestic animals are not permitted in the national park. Photo: Queensland Government.

To help protect native wildlife, such as the genetically distinct population of koalas, domestic animals are not permitted in the national park. Photo: Queensland Government.

Enjoy the mild subtropical climate of Minjerribah. Photo courtesy of Tourism and Events Queensland.

Enjoy the mild subtropical climate of Minjerribah. Photo courtesy of Tourism and Events Queensland.

Essentials to bring

  • Be self-sufficient in the national park. Bring food, water and first-aid supplies.
  • Remember sunscreen, hat and insect repellent.
  • Bring rubbish bags and take all rubbish away for appropriate disposal.

Opening hours

The Blue Lake section of Naree Budjong Djara National Park is open 24 hours a day. Please remember, camping is not permitted in the national park. Mining leases cover various parts of the island and surround areas of national park. You must not traverse these areas without prior permission from the mining lease holder.

Temporary Restricted Access Area

Stingaree Island and lands adjacent to Swan Bay

A temporary restricted access area currently covers the southern end of North Stradbroke Island where the national park coincides with the marine park, including Stingaree Island and the lands adjacent to Swan Bay.

The purpose of the proposed restricted access area is to allow for the Quandamooka Yoolooburrabee Aboriginal Corporation (QYAC)—the prescribed body corporate for the Quandamooka people—to carry out an audit of the natural and cultural heritage values of the area.

The Quandamooka people will assess the plants, animals, dunes and cultural values of North Stradbroke Island’s southern tip in a study that is anticipated to take at least six months.

Signs have been put in place to let people know about the restricted access, and the area will remain closed until further notice.

Boaties can still enjoy the waters around Stingaree Island, along Duck Creek and Swan Bay as per the existing provisions of the marine park green zone.

Main Beach will remain open for driving and fishing—the closure does not restrict access to any tracks or through-routes.

See the restricted access area notice (PDF, 353K) for a map and further information.

Permits and fees

There are currently no permits or fees required for visitors to enter into Naree Budjong Djara National Park. However large organised groups and commercial operators planning on visiting the park should contact NPSR permit and licence management.

All camping areas on Minjerribah require bookings and camping permits. Straddie Camping manages the Minjerribah Recreation Area that covers the following sites;

  • the holiday parks at Adams Beach, Bradbury's Beach, Amity Point, Adder Rock, Home Beach and Cylinder Beach
  • the beach camping areas at Main Beach and Flinders Beach
  • the foreshores at Main Beach and Flinders Beach.

For all camping and vehicle access permit bookings and enquiries, phone (07) 3409 9668 or visit www.straddiecamping.com.au.

Pets

Domestic animals are not permitted in Naree Budjong Djara National Park. However dogs on leashes are permitted within the Minjerribah Recreation Area including Main Beach, Main Beach camping area, Flinders Beach, Flinders Beach camping area and west of the Amity Point beach access to end of beach.

Horse riding is not permitted within the Naree Budjong Djara National Park or in the Minjerribah Recreation Area.

See North Stradbroke Island map (PDF, 563K) for recreation area boundaries.

Climate and weather

Minjerribah has a mild subtropical climate. The average daily temperature range is 22–30°C in summer and 12–20°C in winter. January and February are the wettest months.

This park is best enjoyed in the cooler months, as summers can be quite hot.

Weather forecasts are available from the Bureau of Meteorology.

For more information, see tourism information links.

Fuel and supplies

Fuel and supplies are available at Dunwich, Amity and Point Lookout townships. There are no LPG pumps, so vehicles that run on gas should be filled on the mainland.

For more information, see the tourism information links.

Staying safe

Use sun protection, carry water and stay on the walking tracks at all times. Photo: Queensland Government.

Use sun protection, carry water and stay on the walking tracks at all times. Photo: Queensland Government.

Beaches have hazards including washouts and exposed rocks. Stay alert when driving. Photo: Queensland Government.

Beaches have hazards including washouts and exposed rocks. Stay alert when driving. Photo: Queensland Government.

General safety

  • Hidden snags and shallow water in lakes and lagoons can pose dangers for swimmers. Please take care if swimming in lakes and lagoons.
  • Wear insect repellent, protective clothing and sturdy footwear to guard against stings, scratches and bites.
  • Use protection from the sun—wear sunscreen, a hat, sunglasses and a long-sleeve shirt, even on cloudy days.
  • Stay on the walking tracks at all times and take care on loose and uneven surfaces.
  • Always carry water and try to walk in the cooler parts of the day.

Drive safely

Minjerribah is a sand island. There is a network of sealed roads on the northern section of the island connecting the townships and major sightseeing attractions. Two-wheel-drive vehicles are suitable on these roads. Four-wheel-drive vehicles are required for driving on Flinders Beach and Main Beach. Normal road rules apply on all roads and on Flinders and Main Beaches. Beaches have hazards, including washouts, soft sand and exposed rocks, particularly after heavy rain and rough seas. Stay alert when driving and follow the safety advice below.

Drive only when you are safe

  • Do not drive when you are tired or under the influence of alcohol or medication.
  • You need to be constantly alert and familiar with sand driving techniques—4WDs handle differently in sand.

Before heading off

  • Ensure your vehicle is mechanically sound.
  • Carry essential spares, extra fuel, water, tyre gauge, air pump, snatch strap, tow rope and a first-aid kit.
  • Know how your vehicle handles in sand-driving conditions and use correct driving techniques.

Load your vehicle correctly

  • Do not overload your vehicle.
  • Load your vehicle evenly with heavy items stored low.
  • Do not store too much on roof racks, as your vehicle can overturn or become stuck.
  • Remember the weight and balance of a 4WD vehicle is different from a normal car.

Keep below the speed limit

  • The speed limit on Flinders Beach is 40km/hr and on Main Beach it is 60km/hr.
  • Depending on conditions, safe travelling speeds could be much slower.
  • People driving too fast for the unexpected are more likely to have accidents.

Obey all road rules

  • Road rules apply on all island tracks and beaches.
  • All vehicles must be registered.
  • Wear seatbelts at all times.
  • Kept left of oncoming vehicles at all times.
  • Use indicators only when overtaking or turning.
  • All drivers must hold the appropriate licence.
  • Never sit outside the vehicle when it’s moving.

Give way to:

  • pedestrians—they often cannot hear approaching vehicles above the sound of surf or strong winds. Slow down near people on the beach, especially around children
  • shorebirds and other wildlife—always go slow and go around flocks of birds.

When sand driving

  • Access onto the beach and driving a vehicle on the beach one hour before and one hour after high tide is not permitted. High tide is calculated from published tide times for Brisbane Bar with Flinders Beach and Main Beach 80 minutes earlier than the high tide time at the Brisbane Bar. Please see Redlands on Moreton Bay for more information.
  • Do not drive or park within one metre of a sand dune or on any dune vegetation.
  • Engage locking hubs and 4WD on soft beach sand.
  • Check that your tyre pressure gauge works. If you choose to reduce your tyre pressure to help maintain traction on soft sand, do so within manufacture’s specifications and re-inflate your tyres again on harder sand or on sealed roads.
  • Avoid sharp turns and sudden braking.
  • Select low gears for soft, dry sand.
  • If your vehicle bogs, reverse out and try to drive forward again.

For more information, please read the guidelines on safety in parks and forests.

Looking after the park

Ensure you minimise your impact on the island's fragile environments, such as the sand dunes. Photo: Queensland Government.

Ensure you minimise your impact on the island's fragile environments, such as the sand dunes. Photo: Queensland Government.

Avoid wearing sunscreen if you chose to swim at freshwater lagoons and lakes as it can pollute the lagoon area. Photo: Queensland Government.

Avoid wearing sunscreen if you chose to swim at freshwater lagoons and lakes as it can pollute the lagoon area. Photo: Queensland Government.

When visiting Minjerribah, especially Naree Budjong Djara National Park, ensure that you minimise your impact on its sensitive and fragile environments, to help conserve this special place.

  • Please take your rubbish away—littering in the national park and other areas is prohibited.
  • Respect the wildlife—help maintain this natural environment, enjoyed by day visitors as a quiet haven away from the bustle of the mainland.
  • Dogs are not permitted in the national park—their scent and droppings disturb the natural habits of the native fauna.
  • Swimming and the use of sunscreen can pollute lakes and lagoons causing an increase in the nutrient balance, resulting in a threat to its wildlife.
  • Stay on walking tracks at all times—shortcutting damages vegetation and causes erosion.
  • Take only photographs, leave only footprints—everything in the national park is protected.

See the guidelines on caring for parks for more information about protecting the environment and heritage in parks. 

Park management

Currently about half of Minjerribah is protected as national park. Photo: Queensland Government.

Currently about half of Minjerribah is protected as national park. Photo: Queensland Government.

To help conserve Minjerribah’s cultural heritage and natural biodiversity the national park on the island has been extended.

The new national park on Minjerribah—Naree Budjong Djara National Park—was declared on 25 March 2011 and includes the area previously known as Blue Lake National Park.

Naree Budjong Djara National Park is jointly managed by the Quandamooka people and the Department of National Parks, Sport and Racing. The Traditional Owners and departmental officers work together to develop visitor management policies and operational procedures for the national park.

Tourism information links

Enjoy the tranquility of Minjerribah. Photo courtesy of Robert Ashdown.

Enjoy the tranquility of Minjerribah. Photo courtesy of Robert Ashdown.

Stradbroke Island Tourism Information Centre
www.stradbroketourism.com
Shop 1, 4 Kennedy Drive
Point Lookout, North Stradbroke Island Qld 4183
ph (07) 3415 3044
email office@straddieonline.com.au

Redlands Visitor Information Centre at IndigiScapes 
www.redland.qld.gov.au/AboutRedlands/VisitorInfo
17 Runnymede Road, Capalaba Qld 4157
ph 07 3829 8552 or 1300 667 386
email VisitorCentre@redland.qld.gov.au

Redcliffe Central Visitor Information Centre
www.redcliffe.net.au Redcliffe Parade, Redcliffe Qld 4020
ph (07) 3283 3577
email redcliffe.tourism@moretonbay.qld.gov.au 

Redcliffe Visitor Information Centre
www.moretonbay.qld.gov.au
Pelican Park, Hornibrook Esplanade, Redcliffe Qld 4020
ph 1800 659 500
email clontarf.tourism@moretonbay.qld.gov.au

Wynnum Manly Tourism Visitor Information Centre
manlyhourbourvillage.com.au
William Gunn Jetty
43a Cambridge Parade, Manly, Qld 4179
ph (07) 3348 3524
email information@manlyharbourvillage.com

Brisbane Visitor Information Centre
www.visitbrisbane.com.au
Queen Street Mall, Brisbane Qld 4002
ph (07) 3006 6290
email visit@brisbanemarketing.com.au

For tourism information for all regions in Queensland see Queensland Holidays.

Further information

Contact us

Last updated
3 February 2016