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About Parklands

Getting there and getting around

Access the main entrance at Radar Hill by taking the Parklands exit off the Bruce Highway about 4 km north of Nambour or 5 km south of Yandina.

Wheelchair accessibility

There are no wheelchair-accessible facilities in the park.

Park features

Open forest on the Komine circuit, Parklands Regional Park. Photo: Ross Naumann

Open forest on the Komine circuit, Parklands Regional Park. Photo: Ross Naumann

Parklands Regional Park is a valuable wildlife habitat with vegetation ranging from eucalypt forests of bloodwood and tallowwood trees (with banksia, wattle and grass tree understorey), to rainforest gullies with flooded gum, turpentine and, in protected wetter areas, groves of palms.

On dry rocky ridges clothed in casuarinas, views to the coast can be glimpsed through gaps in the trees.

A number of creeks lead to rock pools and cascades, which flow after heavy rainfall.

Camping and accommodation

Camping

Camping is not permitted in Parklands Regional Park. Reserves with camping areas nearby include Conondale National Park, Beerburrum State Forest, and Mapleton National Park.

Other accommodation

There is a range of holiday accommodation on the Sunshine Coast, including private camping areas—see the tourism information links below for further information.

Things to do

Forest on the Rocky Creek circuit, Parklands Regional Park. Photo Ross Naumann

Forest on the Rocky Creek circuit, Parklands Regional Park. Photo Ross Naumann

In Parklands Regional Park, banksias are common in the open forest understory. Photo Ross Naumann

In Parklands Regional Park, banksias are common in the open forest understory. Photo Ross Naumann

Walking, horse riding and cycling

Walkers, cyclists and horse riders share 15 km of multi-use trails. Be aware that the trails cross a number of creeks and lead to rock pools and cascades, which flow after heavy rainfall. There are steep sections; walkers should have high fitness levels.

Cyclists should be aware that forest tracks are suitable for bicycles designed for off-road riding. They are not suitable for bicycles designed for smooth road surfaces.

When using these tracks:

  • walkers give way to horse riders, and
  • cyclists give way to both walkers and horse riders.

Coobong circuit—5.2 km return. Sections with steep grades

Travel through open eucalypt forest where bloodwood and tallowwood trees are common and banksias, wattles, grass trees and hopbush grow in the forest understorey.

In more protected, wetter areas the forest features flooded gum, turpentine, cabbage tree palm, piccabeen palm and some rainforest plants.

You will cross two small creeks and pass apiary bee hives on this circuit.

Rocky Creek circuit—5.4 km return. Sections with steep grades, slippery when wet

A grassy forest floor, with trees including tallowwood, bloodwood and casuarina on the high ridges, is characteristic of this track. In the lower areas scribbly gum, bracken fern and palm groves grow in protected gullies where the soil retains more moisture.

Lemon Tree circuit—7.8 km return. Sections with steep grades, slippery when wet

Similar to the Rocky Creek circuit, this track includes dry, rocky ridges with views to the coast. Some sections are more exposed, making the dry open forest a hotter area through which to travel, especially during the warmer summer months.

Komine circuit—11 km return. Section with extremely steep grades that requires riders to dismount

Cooler winter months are the best time to explore this circuit. It winds through open scribbly gum forest and includes large sections of track with little shade.

Things to know before you go

Essentials to bring

  • Bring adequate drinking water, a first-aid kit, insect repellent and a mobile phone.
  • Wear suitable shoes, sunscreen, a hat and long-sleeved shirt.
  • Cyclists and horse riders should wear a helmet.
  • Bring a camera and binoculars for viewing wildlife.
  • Cyclists should carry a basic repairs kit.

Opening hours

For your safety, visit Parklands Regional Park in daylight hours only.

Pets

Domestic animals are not permitted in this park with the exception of horses that are permitted on recreational trails as indicated on the park map (PDF, 150K)*.

Climate and weather

The average daily temperature range is 18–28 °C in summer and 11–20 °C in winter. In summer temperatures can exceed 30 °C.

For more information see the tourism information links below.

Fuel and supplies

The nearest fuel and supplies are available in Nambour, a short drive from the park. For more information see the tourism information links below.

Staying safe

Rocky Creek, Parklands Regional Park. Photo: Ross Naumann

Rocky Creek, Parklands Regional Park. Photo: Ross Naumann

  • Plan ahead—let a responsible person know of your itinerary, and emergency plan if things go wrong.
  • Carry enough drinking water, a snack and mobile phone.
  • Obey all safety and warning signs.
  • Do not walk or ride alone.
  • Explore in daylight hours only.
  • Wear adequate sun and insect protection.

Ride safely

  • Always wear a helmet.
  • Ride within your ability and according to track conditions.
  • Slow down or stop when approaching other track users.
  • Avoid skidding and sliding around turns to avoid injury or collision with other track users.
  • Avoid riding in large groups and on soft, wet and muddy tracks.
    Stay on marked trails—riding over vegetation, taking shortcuts and forming new tracks damages plants and wildlife habitat, and is an offence.

For more information, please read the guidelines on safety in parks and forests.

Looking after the park

Parklands Regional Park protects natural bushland that provides an important refuge for wildlife in an increasingly urbanised environment. You can help protect this area.

  • Stay on designated tracks.
  • Obey the rules put in place to protect the park; note that camping, fires, domestic animals, motorbikes and vehicles are not permitted in the park.
  • Take all your rubbish with you for appropriate disposal.
  • Do not feed wildlife—animals become reliant on hand-outs or food scraps, can get sick and often become aggressive towards humans.

See the guidelines on caring for parks for more information about protecting our environment and heritage in parks.

Park management

Parklands Regional Park was gazetted as a forest reserve in 2001 and became a conservation park in 2006. Parklands Regional Park is managed by the Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service (QPWS) under the Nature Conservation Act 1992 to preserve and present its natural and cultural values in perpetuity.

Tourism information links

Tall eucalypts grow in Parklands Regional Park. Photo: Ross Naumann

Tall eucalypts grow in Parklands Regional Park. Photo: Ross Naumann

For more information about activities, tours and accommodation in this region, contact:

Caloundra Visitor Information Centre
www.caloundratourism.com 
7 Caloundra Rd, Caloundra Qld 4551
ph (07) 5491 9233 or 1800 644 969
email: tourist.info@caloundratourism.com.au

Kawana Visitor Information Centre
Jessica Boulevard, Nicklin Way, Minyama Qld 4575
ph (07) 5420 8006
fax: (07) 5420 8009
email: visitorinfo@sunshinecoast.qld.gov.au

Maroochy Tourism
www.maroochytourism.com 
Cnr Melrose Pde; Sixth Ave, Cotton Tree Qld 4558
ph (07) 5479 1566 or 1800 882 032
fax: (07) 5479 1761
email: admin@maroochytourism.com

For tourism information for all regions in Queensland, see www.queenslandholidays.com.au

Further information

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Last updated
1 July 2013