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About Springbrook

Getting there and getting around

Looking towards the Gold Coast. Photo: R. Ashdown, Queensland Government.

Looking towards the Gold Coast. Photo: R. Ashdown, Queensland Government.

Springbrook National Park is located about 100 km south of Brisbane and comprises four sections on and around the plateau; Springbrook section, which extends along the crest of the plateau, Mount Cougal section to the east and Natural Bridge and Numinbah sections to the west.

Springbrook section

From the Pacific Motorway, Springbrook plateau is 24 km from Mudgeeraba or 36 km from Nerang. Exit the Pacific Motorway at Mudgeeraba (exit 79 from the north, exit 80 from the south) and follow the Gold Coast–Springbrook Road. Alternatively, exit the Pacific Motorway at Nerang (exit 69) and follow the Nerang–Murwillumbah Road for 23 km then take the Springbrook turn-off at Pine Creek Road. Both bitumen roads are steep and narrow.

Note: There is no through-road access to New South Wales from the Springbrook plateau.

Natural Bridge section

Exit the Pacific Motorway at Nerang (exit 69) and follow the Nerang–Murwillumbah Road for 38 km. Turn left into the park entrance. An alternative scenic route is 42 km via the Springbrook plateau from Mudgeeraba. From the Pacific Motorway take exit 80 from the south or exit 79 from the north and follow the Gold Coast–Springbrook Road to the plateau then turn right onto Pine Creek Road. Follow Pine Creek Road to the end and then turn left onto the Nerang–Murwillumbah Road. Natural Bridge can also be reached from Murwillumbah by following the Numinbah Road for 28 km. The scenic access roads are winding and should be travelled with care.

Important! Cave Creek in the Natural Bridge section has been declared a restricted access area. Swimming in the creek and access to the creek bank is now prohibited. Penalties apply!

Mount Cougal section

Exit the Gold Coast Highway (exit 93) at Currumbin and follow the Currumbin Valley Road 21 km to its end.

Numinbah section

Numinbah is 13 km north of Natural Bridge section on Nerang–Murwillumbah Road. Leave the Pacific Motorway at Nerang (exit 69) and follow the Nerang–Murwillumbah Road for 25 km. From the other direction on this route, this part of the park is 42 km north-west of Murwillumbah. An alternative scenic route is 28 km via the Springbrook plateau from Mudgeeraba. From the Pacific Motorway take exit 79 from the north or exit 80 from the south and follow the Gold Coast–Springbrook Road to the plateau. Turn right onto Pine Creek Road, follow it to the end and then turn left onto the Nerang–Murwillumbah Road. These scenic access roads are winding and should be travelled with care.

Wheelchair accessibility

Wheelchair assisted access is possible at Mount Cougal section along the 800 m bitumen Cascades walking track. On Springbrook plateau, Canyon lookout and the information centre lookout and boardwalk are suitable for wheelchairs with assistance.

Park features

Springbrook's spectacular landscape is punctuated with breath-taking waterfalls, such as Twin Falls. Photo: Queensland Government.

Springbrook's spectacular landscape is punctuated with breath-taking waterfalls, such as Twin Falls. Photo: Queensland Government.

Dominating the Gold Coast's western skyline, Springbrook's cool forests and mountain streams offer views of impressive landscapes, and walks among subtropical and temperate rainforest, open eucalypt forest and montane heath.

Spectacular waterfalls, cascades and tumbling creeks are dominant features in this World Heritage-listed Gondwana Rainforests of Australia park.

Springbrook National Park covers 6725 ha and is in four main sections—Springbrook plateau, Mount Cougal to the east and Natural Bridge and Numinbah to the west. The plateau has many lookouts with fabulous views while Mount Cougal offers an insight into the area's logging history.

Visit Natural Bridge by day to see a unique waterfall or after dark to discover the park's amazing glow-worms or picnic on the shaded banks of the Nerang River at Forest Park picnic area.

Camping and accommodation

Be a minimal impact camper; leave no trace. Photo: A Creed, Queensland Government.

Be a minimal impact camper; leave no trace. Photo: A Creed, Queensland Government.

Camping

Camping is available at The Settlement camping area on Springbrook plateau. To camp in the national park a permit is required and bookings must be made in advance. Fees apply.

Camping is not available in the Numinbah section of the park and is no longer permitted at Gwongorella, near Purling Brook Falls.

Other accommodation

There are several privately run campgrounds, guesthouse, lodges and bed and breakfasts within a short distance of Springbrook National Park. For more information see the tourism information links below.

Things to do

At any time of the year expect a cooler and often wetter conditions, so bring warm clothes and a raincoat! Photo: Adam Creed, Queensland Government.

At any time of the year expect a cooler and often wetter conditions, so bring warm clothes and a raincoat! Photo: Adam Creed, Queensland Government.

Take in the breath-taking views of Mount Warning from Best of All lookout. Photo: Dan Garnett, Queensland Government.

Take in the breath-taking views of Mount Warning from Best of All lookout. Photo: Dan Garnett, Queensland Government.

Springbrook National Park offers many opportunities for the visitor to explore and enjoy the natural surrounds:

Walking tracks

Springbrook National Park offers a wide range of walking opportunities ranging from 300 m to 54 km in length.

The Gold Coast Hinterland Great Walk can either start or finish at The Settlement camping area. If you are interested in undertaking this 54 km walk, please read the walk's details so you can better plan your Gold Coast Hinterland Great Walk.

Springbrook National Park's walking tracks have been classified so you can select a walk that matches your bushwalking experience and fitness. This classification system is based on the Australian Standards. Take time to read the key to track standards before walking in the park.

Allow 15 to 20 min to walk 1 km. This time is calculated for people of average fitness and bushwalking experience and who are wearing correct footwear. If you are walking with young children or are an inexperienced bushwalker, allow more time to include rests and to return to your starting point.

Distances given are from the track entrance and return. Apart from the Gold Coast Hinterland Great Walk, Numinbah section has no marked walking tracks.

Springbrook National Park walking tracks:

'Boogul yahnbelehla!' Have a good walk! ( Yugambeh)

Key to track standards

The classification system is based on Australian Standards. Please note that while each track is classified according to its most difficult section, other sections may be of an easier level.

Class 1 walking track Class 1 track (Australian Standards)
  • Wheelchair-accessible track with handrails at lookout.
Class 2 walking track Class 2 track (Australian Standards)
  • Easy level track, suitable for all fitness levels.
  • All junctions signposted and may include interpretive signs.
Class 3 walking track Class 3 track (Australian Standards)
  • Distinct tracks with junctions signposted. Rough track surfaces with some exposed roots and rocks.
  • Variable in width. Muddy sections, steep grades and steps may be encountered.
  • May be partially overgrown; hazards such as fallen trees and rockfalls may be present.
  • Caution needed at creek crossings, cliff edges and naturally occurring lookouts.
  • Reasonable level of fitness and ankle-supporting footwear recommended.
Class 4 walking track Class 4 track (Australian Standards)
  • Distinct tracks with junctions signposted. Rough track surfaces with exposed roots and rocks.
  • Variable in width. Muddy sections and steep grades likely to be encountered.
  • May be extensively overgrown; hazards such as fallen trees and rock falls likely to be present.
  • Caution needed at creek crossings, cliff edges and naturally occurring lookouts.
  • Moderate fitness level with bushwalking experience and ankle-supporting footwear recommended.

Walking tracks at a glance

Matching experience and expectations—to make your planning easier, simply match your expectations and experience with the most suitable track or trail.

Track name Classification Distance return Platform lookout Natural lookout

Tracks accessed from Springbrook plateau, Springbrook National Park:

Wunburra lookout Class 2 walking track Class 2 30 m Yes -
Canyon lookout Class 1 walking track Class 1 30 m Yes -
Goomoolahra Falls lookout track Class 2 walking track Class 2 200 m Yes -
Best of All lookout track Class 2 walking track Class 2 600 m Yes -
Purling Brook Falls circuit Class 3 walking track Class 3 4 km Yes -
Twin Falls circuit Class 3 walking track Class 3 4 km Yes -
Warrie circuit Class 4 walking track Class 4 17 km Yes Yes

Tracks accessed from Natural Bridge section, Springbrook National Park:

Natural Bridge circuit Class 2 walking track Class 2 1 km Yes -

Tracks accessed from Mount Cougal section, Springbrook National Park:

Cascades track Class 2 walking track Class 2 1.6 km Yes -

Walking tracks on Springbrook plateau

Several vantage points on the plateau provide extensive views of the surrounding ranges, foothills and the coastline. Constructed lookouts, providing safe viewing, are easily accessible via a short walk. Be aware that these lookouts are often shrouded by cloud, even when the weather is fine and sunny on the coast. For the best views, visit on clear, smoke-free days.

Before setting out, visit the national park information centre display that is open between 8.00 am and 3.30 pm daily on weekdays. Please note that this centre is not staffed and if you need to contact a ranger please see contact details. Originally Springbrook's first schoolhouse, this quaint 1911 building is once again involved in education. The centre features wildlife and historical displays. Visit the plateau's montane heathland boardwalk and lookout 100 m from the centre's car park. Public toilets are located beside the information centre.

Class 2 walking track Wunburra lookout (Class 2)

Distance: 30 m return

Time: Allow about 5 mins

Details: Just off the Gold Coast–Springbrook Road, Wunburra lookout has views of Purling Brook valley, Mount Cougal and the Little Nerang Dam. The car park is small and can be crowded on weekends or public holidays. Take care with children; keep behind the bollards as there is a busy road close by. Views from this lookout highlight the geological processes of erosion.

Class 1 walking track Canyon lookout (Class 1)

Distance: 30 m return

Time: Allow about 5 mins

Details: Step out of your vehicle and you're there! Take in the superb views of Twin and Rainbow falls, the sheer walls of The Canyon and the ocean beyond. The spectacular views from Canyon lookout are a result of millions of years of erosion, landslides and weathering. These geological processes will continue to shape the landscape before you. This location is the starting point for the Twin Falls and Warrie circuits.

Class 2 walking track Goomoolahra Falls lookout track (Class 2)

Distance: 200 m return

Time: Allow about 5 mins

Details: This wheelchair-assisted track passes through the Goomoolahra picnic area and takes walkers to several lookouts at the top of the 60 m high Goomoolahra Falls. On a clear day the north facing views stretch to Stradbroke and Moreton islands and Moreton Bay.

Class 2 walking track Best of All lookout track (Class 2)

Distance: 600 m return

Time: Allow about 30 mins walking time

Details: Walk through ancient Antarctic beech forest; a remnant link to a past cooler climate, to a view of northern New South Wales dominated by Mount Warning, which is the lava plug centre of the erosion caldera of the extinct Tweed shield volcano. The small pocket of Antarctic beech forest Nothofagus moorei is one of our remaining links with the ancient forests of Gondwana. Nothofagus forests were once widespread across the continent and provided a habitat for many animals that have long since disappeared from our landscape.

Class 3 walking track Purling Brook Falls circuit (Class 3)
DANGER DANGER: Sheer cliffs and waterfalls. One slip could be fatal—serious injury or death may result from walking near the edge. Keep to the track. Supervise children closely.

Distance: 4 km return

Time: Allow about 2 hrs walking time. Note: it is easier to walk the track in a clockwise direction. If including the Warringa Pool track, which leads downstream from the base of the falls, add another 2 km and allow another 40 mins to return.

Caution: Sections of the Purling Brook Falls circuit and Warringa Pool track are part of Gold Coast Hinterland Great Walk: arrow markers indicate the walk. This is an arduous walk. Please do not attempt it unless you are a Great Walker and have a copy of the Gold Coast Hinterland Great Walk topographic map.

Details: Pass through open eucalypt forest of New England ash Eucalyptus campanulata, where fire-adapted species such as lepidozamias, hakeas and various wildflowers grow, before descending into the gorge to view the falls from below. A steady climb through forest brings the walker back to the picnic area. Water flowing over Purling Brook Falls is high quality because its catchment is protected in the Gondwana Rainforests of Australia World Heritage Area. Walking in this area is a privilege. Be responsible for keeping the catchment clean—practice minimal impact bushwalking.

Class 3 walking track Twin Falls circuit (Class 3)
DANGER DANGER: Sheer cliffs and waterfalls. One slip could be fatal—serious injury or death may result from walking near the edge. Keep to the track. Supervise children closely.

Distance: 4 km return

Time: Allow about 2 hrs walking time

Details: Start this walk from Tallanbana picnic area or Canyon lookout. Follow the track in an anti-clockwise direction to take advantage of the interpretive signs, which guide the walker through different forest types. Pass behind two waterfalls, through rock clefts and among palms and treeferns. Notice the smooth, pink bark of the brush box Lophostemon confertus that occur along the track. Similar brush box in other parts of this World Heritage area have been radiocarbon-dated at 1500 years, making these trees the oldest ever carbon-dated on Australia's mainland.

Class 4 walking track Warrie circuit (Class 4)
DANGER DANGER: Sheer cliffs and waterfalls. One slip could be fatal—serious injury or death may result from walking near the edge. Keep to the track. Supervise children closely.

Distance: 17 km return

Time: Allow about 5 to 6 hrs walking time

Caution: Creek crossings may be impassable after heavy rain. Allow enough time to finish the walk in daylight hours.

Details: Start at Canyon lookout or Tallanbana picnic area. The longest and most interesting track on the plateau follows the base of The Canyon cliffs to Goomoolahra Falls before descending into the mossy green depths of the rainforest. The track (named with the Aboriginal word 'Warrie', meaning 'rushing water') crosses several creeks and gullies. The track reaches the 'Meeting of the Waters', where all watercourses draining The Canyon meet, then climbs up the western side of the gorge. The moist and shady conditions at the base of Goomoolahra Falls provide an ideal habitat for the giant spear lilies Doryanthes palmeri. This succulent herb is one of only two members of the Doryanthiacea plant family, which is endemic to Australia.

Walking in Natural Bridge section

The natural rock bridge, plunging waterfall and arched cave are surrounded by subtropical rainforest in the beautiful Numinbah Valley.

Nestled under the western ramparts of Springbrook plateau, the lush subtropical rainforest does not immediately disclose the cave and rock bridge for which the area has become famous. A display stand at the track entrance has maps and information about the park and its wildlife.

Part of Cave Creek within the Natural Bridge section of the national park is now a restricted access area—swimming is prohibited; penalties apply. Access is restricted to protect the glow-worms and the creek's sensitive ecosystem as well as to maximise visitor safety.

Nearby Bochow Park and Forest Park in Numinbah section are perfect for picnicking. Both areas feature a creek and are popular spots during summer.

Note: There is very poor mobile phone reception in this area.

Class 2 walking track Natural Bridge circuit (Class 2)

Distance: 1 km return

Time: Allow about 1 hr walking time.

Note: Due to long sets of stairs, it is easier to walk this track in a clockwise direction.

Details: A sealed circuit track takes you through the forest, across Cave Creek and into the arched cave to witness the waterfall plunging from above. At night the cave is illuminated by thousands of glow-worms' tiny green lights. While glow-worms are visible year-round, their display is significantly reduced during the winter months. Interpretive signs along the circuit highlight the park's special features. The hoop pines Araucaria cunninghamii that emerge through the thick greenery of the surrounding rainforest are living relics of the Jurassic Age—the age of the conifers—about 180 million years ago. These pines are 'living dinosaurs'—they are among the most primitive of conifers.

Explore by night

Glow-worms are sensitive to changes to their environment, so please follow some basic cave rules:

  • Never expose glow-worms to smoke from cigarettes or fire, bright lights or insect repellents, as these can kill them.
  • Do not shine torchlight directly on the glow-worms; they will stop glowing for up to one hour—interrupting their feeding as well as spoiling the experience for others.
  • Note: After significant rainfall, part of the Natural Bridge walking track may be closed for public safety. Access is generally still available to the bridge formation and glow-worm cave.

Walking in Mount Cougal section

At the headwaters of Currumbin Valley, the twin peaks of Mount Cougal give their name to this predominantly wilderness area of subtropical rainforest and rock-strewn creek beds. A display stand at the track entrance has maps and information about the park and its wildlife.

Note: There is very poor mobile phone reception in this area. The closest public phone is at Currumbin Rock Pools 6 km back along the Currumbin Road.

Cascades are scenic park features, but don't take risks with them! The creek contains submerged logs and rocks. Water depth is inconsistent and unpredictable. Because of moss and algae, rocks are slippery, even when they appear dry. Several people have died or suffered permanent spinal cord injuries after jumping or diving into the creek. Take notice of park signs.

Class 2 walking track Cascades track (Class 2)
DANGER DANGER: The creek contains submerged logs and rocks. Serious injury or death may result from jumping or diving in this water. Take care on rocks, as they may be slippery.

Distance: 1.6 km return

Time: Allow about 1 hr walking time

Details: The 800 m, bitumen path has a gradual uphill rise and is suitable for prams and assisted wheelchair access. Walk through subtropical rainforest beside Currumbin Creek to viewing platforms overlooking scenic cascades. Follow self-guiding signs to the historic sawmill and discover the park's past. The mill is a vivid reminder of the days when forests were valued only for their millable timber. Take time to reflect on why we need forests like those at Mount Cougal.

Guided tours and walks

The Connect with Nature program offers a range of nature-based activities and events every season for adults, children and families in and around parks and forests throughout Brisbane, Western Scenic Rim and Gold Coast and hinterland.

A number of commercial operators conduct night tours to Natural Bridge section of Springbrook National Park to view the glow-worms. For more information see the tourism information links below.

Picnic and day-use areas

There are several popular picnic areas here. No rubbish bins are provided in Springbrook National Park—please take your rubbish home with you. Where barbecues are provided bring your own clean, milled firewood. Please do not collect bark, sticks or branches for firewood from the park or roadside—fines apply. 

Springbrook plateau

All picnic areas on the plateau have toilets and sheltered picnic areas. Springbrook plateau can be cool and rainy at all times of the year so carry a raincoat and warm clothing. Cliffs and waterfalls are spectacular but dangerous features of the park. All creeks on the plateau abruptly become waterfalls.

Rocks are slippery, even when they appear dry. Keep to walking tracks and supervise children closely—wandering off tracks could be fatal.

The Settlement day-use area, Gwongorella and Goomoolahra picnic areas all have disabled toilets; access may require assistance. Note: The Settlement car park and day-use area are grassed. Tallanbana picnic area is located just past the Canyon lookout. The Settlement day-use area, located opposite The Settlement camping area, features a large, flat grassed area suitable for large group activities. Please note that group activities that may interfere with general public use of the area will require a group activity notification form.

Natural Bridge section

A sheltered picnic table is available at the start of the walking track. Toilets are provided. Water not suitable for drinking. Natural Bridge can be very crowded and alternative picnic sites are available at the Forest Park picnic area in Numinbah section and Bochow Park, a few kilometres to the north. Both areas are perfect for a picnic or barbecue, feature a creek and are popular spots for a variety of activities.

Part of Cave Creek within the park has been declared a restricted access area. Access to the creek and creek bank is now prohibited.

A public telephone is available further north along the Nerang-Murwillumbah Road. Cafes are located to the north of the park on Nerang-Murwillumbah Road as well as at Crystal Creek or Chillingham located south of the park in New South Wales.

If you are looking for a place to swim, visit Bochow Park, a Gold Coast City Council park, 4 km north of Natural Bridge or Forest Park picnic area 12.8 km north of Natural Bridge. These sites offer easy access to the Nerang River, barbeques, picnic tables and open space. Before entering the water please be aware that there are many hazards in natural waterways—serious injury or death can result from people diving or jumping into pools, lakes and rivers.

Mount Cougal section

The small picnic area is located adjacent to the car park and beside the walking track entrance. Picnic tables and toilets are provided. Water is available for washing only—it is not suitable for drinking. No barbecues are provided.

Numinbah section

Wood barbecues, picnic tables, a shelter shed and toilets are provided at the Forest Park picnic area. Water is available for washing only—it is not suitable for drinking. Note: Mobile phone reception in this area can be unreliable.

The picnic area also provides easy access to Nerang River. Please see staying safe for water safety in the park.

Viewing wildlife

Subtropical rainforest, ancient Antarctic beech, hoop pines, eucalypt forest and montane heath habitats shelter an incredible variety of wildlife. More than 100 bird species live in the park. The elusive Albert's lyrebird, more often heard than seen, is part of an ancient, unique bird group that probably evolved when flowering plants began to dominate the landscape. In the winter months its vibrant composite call can be heard from the depths of the valleys. Springbrook provides an important refuge for this species of songbird.

The most frequently seen reptiles are prehistoric-looking lace monitors, glossy black skinks known as land mullets, and sleepy carpet pythons.

The abundance of water in the park has resulted in a diverse selection of water-dwelling animals. Frogs are the most vocal, blue spiny crayfish the most colourful and eels the most surprising. Orange-eyed treefrogs Litoria chloris and large, beige-coloured great barred-frogs Mixophyes fasciolatus are often seen on the tracks at night. You might even catch a glimpse of a platypus while visiting the Numinbah section.

Other rare and threatened animals such as the Richmond birdwing butterfly rely on Springbrook and Numinbah's forests for their survival.

Horseriding

Horseriding is permitted on specific forest trails in the Numinbah Forest Reserve, which is part of Springbrook National Park. Please use the trail map (PDF, 411K)* to plan your day’s riding.
Help protect the park environment by adopting a minimal impact approach to horse riding.

Things to know before you go

Wear sensible footwear as tracks can become wet and slippery. Photo: Adam Creed, Queensland Government.

Wear sensible footwear as tracks can become wet and slippery. Photo: Adam Creed, Queensland Government.

Be well prepared for your visit. Photo: Adam Creed, Queensland Government.

Be well prepared for your visit. Photo: Adam Creed, Queensland Government.

Be prepared for your visit to ensure you have a safe and enjoyable time.

Essentials to bring

Be prepared and use sound judgment while visiting and walking in Springbrook National Park.

  • Carry sufficient food and water and a torch.
  • Wear a hat and apply sunscreen to prevent sunburn.
  • Wear sensible footwear—boots or strong shoes, warm and protective wet weather clothing—weather conditions can be changeable.
  • Always pack a first-aid kit and first-aid manual. Learn first-aid procedures.
  • Rubbish bins are not provided. Please bring rubbish bags, and take all recyclables and rubbish with you when you leave.
  • Bring drinking water and pack sterilisation tablets or a fuel stove to treat/boil creek water before drinking.
  • Bring your camera and binoculars for viewing wildlife. A torch, preferably with a red filter to protect animals' eyes, is useful for spotlighting at night.

Opening hours

Springbrook National Park is open 24 hours a day. For your safety, walk in daylight hours only, unless viewing the glow-worms at Natural Bridge. For glow-worm night tours at Natural Bridge, see the tourist information links. If you intend viewing the glow-worms at night please ensure you follow the guidelines in staying safe.

Permits and fees

To camp in Springbrook National Park a camping permit is required and fees apply. Try to book and pay six to eight weeks in advance for public holidays. Bookings are accepted only when accompanied by the appropriate fee. If you wish to extend your stay, you must re-register. A tag with your booking number must be displayed at your camp site. Remember: camping fees must be lodged before camping overnight.

Pets

Domestic animals are not permitted in Springbrook National Park.

Climate and weather

At 900 m above sea level, Springbrook plateau can be quite cool even in summer—the plateau is consistently five degrees cooler than the adjacent lowland. The area can average more than 3000 mm of rain a year, most of which falls between December and March. It is advisable to carry a raincoat and warm clothing at all times of the year.

Winters are usually cold with frosty nights, temperatures dropping to a minimum of -4 °C. Summers are warm to hot, especially on the exposed ridges, reaching 30 °C or slightly above.

Natural Bridge and Mount Cougal are not so wet or cold. Natural Bridge's annual rainfall of 2500 mm falls during the hot, humid summer (maximum 38 °C), while the winters are often clear and crisp (minimum 4 °C). During summer's long, hot days Mount Cougal usually experiences afternoon thunderstorms (maximum 37 °C). Winter mornings at the head of the valley can be brisk with occasional frosts (minimum 2 °C).

Numinbah is slightly warmer than Natural Bridge; summers are hot and humid (maximum 36 °C) while winters are clear and crisp with potential for frosts (minimum 4 °C).

Weather forecasts are available from the Bureau of Meteorology.

Be aware! During extreme weather events such as flooding, access to both Natural Bridge and Purling Brook on the Springbrook plateau may be closed. Please ensure you check the Park alert before you visit this park.

Fuel and supplies

General supplies, public telephones, meals and light refreshments are available on Springbrook plateau. A public telephone and cafe are available along the Nerang-Murwillumbah Road, 1 km north of Natural Bridge section. A public telephone and cafe are located about 2 km south of the Numinbah section. A public telephone and cafe are located east of Mount Cougal along the Currumbin Creek Road. For more information see the tourism information links below.

Staying safe

All creeks on Springbrook plateau become waterfalls! Stay safe and keep on the tracks. Photo: Paul Candlin, Queensland Government.

All creeks on Springbrook plateau become waterfalls! Stay safe and keep on the tracks. Photo: Paul Candlin, Queensland Government.

To protect the environment and yourself, stay on the walking tracks and behind the fences at Natural Bridge. Photo: Dan Garnett, Queensland Government.

To protect the environment and yourself, stay on the walking tracks and behind the fences at Natural Bridge. Photo: Dan Garnett, Queensland Government.

Spinal cord injuries such as quadriplegia and paraplegia are some of the serious consequences of either jumping or diving into creeks. Drowning is the greatest threat to people who have injured their spines through jumping or diving into water. Take notice of the signs and remember; there is no cure for spinal cord injury—it’s with you for life.

Part of Cave Creek in the Natural Bridge section of the national park has been declared a restricted access area. Swimming in the creek and access to the creek bank is now prohibited. Penalties apply.

Please observe and obey signs.

For your safety

  • Be prepared, even on short walks, and judge your ability and conditions carefully before setting out. Do not expect to be warned of every possible danger.
  • Choose walks that suit the capabilities of your entire group.
  • Stay together and keep to the walking tracks. If you leave the track system that is maintained by park staff, you are putting your or your group's safety at risk.
  • Always supervise children.
  • Take care near cliff edges—they can be deceptive and are often closer than you think. Please keep away from the edge and supervise children at all times. Take extra care when using binoculars or cameras at these sites!
  • Never dive or jump into the water as it may be shallow or hide submerged objects. 
  • Wear a hat, sunscreen, comfortable clothes and sturdy shoes with good grip.
  • Take a basic first-aid kit and manual.
  • Always carry drinking water.
  • Leave a copy of your bushwalking plans with a friend, relative or other reliable person. This person has responsibility for contacting police if you are overdue. Your plan should include:
    • your name, address, number of people in your party, ages and any medical conditions
    • vehicle registration, make, model, colour and parking location
    • the route you are taking, expected times of departure and return.
  • Remember that search and rescue is costly, endangers people's lives and can damage the environment.
  • Walk with a recognised bushwalking club. This is a good way to gain experience.
  • Walk with one or more friends. At least one member of each party should be a competent map-reader and bushwalker.
  • Learn map and compass skills. Recommended maps for bushwalking are 1:25 000 topographic maps. It is also advisable to carry a recognised bushwalking guidebook for the area.

Thefts have occurred in this area. Car crime is a problem even here. Help us STOP this problem.

  • Remove all valuables—this includes garage remotes
  • Lock your car
  • Remove your keys.

In an emergency

In case of accident or other emergency please:

  • call Triple Zero (000) or if you have difficulty from your mobile phone, try 112
  • call 106 for a text-only message for deaf or speech or hearing impaired callers
  • advise the nature of the emergency and your location
  • stay on the phone until you are told to hang up.

The nearest hospitals are at Southport and Robina on the Gold Coast. Mobile phone coverage is not reliable, but you can often get a signal whenever you can see the Gold Coast.

For more information, please read the guidelines on safety in parks and forests.

Looking after the park

Remember to pack zip-lock bags so you can take your rubbish home. Photo: Adam Creed, Queensland Government.

Remember to pack zip-lock bags so you can take your rubbish home. Photo: Adam Creed, Queensland Government.

Please use pathogen control stations in the park. Photo: Sergio Norambuena, Queensland Government.

Please use pathogen control stations in the park. Photo: Sergio Norambuena, Queensland Government.

The natural beauty of Springbrook National Park attracts thousands of people to the area, but high visitor numbers create many pressures. Litter, erosion caused by shortcutting tracks, damage to vegetation and disturbance to wildlife all threaten nature's delicate balance.

You can help protect the park by observing these guidelines:

  • Please leave all plants and animals undisturbed.
  • Please do not feed the wildlife. Feeding native animals may cause poor health and sometimes death.
  • Use toilets if available. Away from toilets, ensure all faecal matter and toilet paper is properly buried (15 cm deep) well away from tracks, campsites, watercourses and drainage channels (100 m). Carry out disposable nappies and sanitary and hygiene products.
  • Take your rubbish home. Minimal impact bushwalkers take great care to avoid leaving any rubbish. Remember—pack it in, pack it out. Waste transfer stations are located at the corner of Carricks and Springbrook roads and 300 m north of the Numinbah Valley township.
  • Keep to the walking tracks where provided, don't shortcut, and take care near cliff edges.

Planning a night visit to Natural Bridge? Be aware of the basic cave rules.

Pathogens

Stop the spread of pathogens (disease producing organisms such as phytophthora (PDF)*myrtle rust and amphibian chytrid fungus). Soil and detritus can contain pathogens such as fungal spores that are harmful to the forest and frogs.

  • Keep to designated roads and walking tracks at all times.
  • Start and finish you bushwalk with clean footwear and camping gear by removing soil from footwear, camping spade or trowel and tent pegs before leaving an area and keep all gear as clean and free from soil as possible during the walk.
  • Please clean and disinfect your footwear and camping equipment using a disinfectant either at home or before visiting the park. Use pathogen control stations located at track entrances.
  • Watch the Stop the spread of weeds and pathogens web clip for more information.

Be frog friendly

Springbrook’s waterways provide important habitats for a number of endangered or vulnerable species, particularly frogs. Please help protect these sensitive habitats by following the guidelines below.

  • Please do not disturb, handle or remove frogs, their eggs or tadpoles.
  • Do not use or discard, soap, detergent, shampoo, sunscreen, insect repellent or any other potential pollutant in creeks or along the banks.
  • Keep to walking tracks and cross directly where the track crosses the creek.
  • Please do not disturb or remove rocks or trample vegetation in or directly adjacent to creeks. 

See the guidelines on caring for parks for more information about protecting our environment and heritage in parks.

Park management

Some Antarctic beech trees within the Gondwana Rainforests of Australia World Heritage Area are about 3000 years old! Photo courtesy of G. Threlfo.

Some Antarctic beech trees within the Gondwana Rainforests of Australia World Heritage Area are about 3000 years old! Photo courtesy of G. Threlfo.

The Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service manages Springbrook National Park under the Nature Conservation Act 1992 and Austinville forest reserve trails under the Forestry Act 1959 to preserve and present their remarkable natural and cultural values in perpetuity.

Springbrook National Park's outstanding geological history, evolutionary significance and role in nature conservation are recognised through its inclusion in the World Heritage-listed Gondwana Rainforests of Australia. Management is in accordance with internationally recognised obligations under the World Heritage Convention.

A draft management plan for Springbrook National Park will be prepared in the future.

Tourism information links

Surfers Paradise Visitor Information Centre
www.VeryGC.com
Cavill Avenue, Surfers Paradise QLD 9726
ph 1300 309 440
fax (07) 5570 3259
email info@verygc.com

Springbrook Chamber of Commerce Information 
www.springbrook.info

For tourism information for all regions in Queensland see www.queenslandholidays.com.au and local Tour Operators.

Further information

Contact us

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Last updated
9 March 2014