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About Tuchekoi

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Getting there and getting around

The steep climb to the summit includes stairs, rope chain and scramble. Photo: Matthew Price.

The steep climb to the summit includes stairs, rope chain and scramble. Photo: Matthew Price.

Access to Tuchekoi National Park is via bitumen roads. Travel on the Bruce Highway and take the Pomona turnoff (Pioneer Road). At the end of Pioneer Road, turn right into Reserve Street, then left into School Street and left into Mountain Street. Follow this street to the park. Parking is on the right side of the road at Sunshine Coast Regional Council’s Cooroora Mountain Park. The walking track entrance is on the opposite side of the road. Take care and supervise children closely crossing the road.

Park features

The park’s hiking trail features, Mount Cooroora—a 439 m intrusive volcanic plug, the spectacular views it provides and plant and wildlife communities that live here.

The foothills around the mountain can be explored on shared trails by walkers, horse riders and mountain bike riders.

Camping and accommodation

Camping

Camping is not allowed in the national park.

Private camping areas are located at Pomona and also a short distance away at Gympie, Boreen Point, Tewantin and Noosaville.

Other accommodation

There is a range of holiday accommodation in and around Gympie, Pomona, Boreen Point, Tewantin and Noosaville.

For more information see the tourism information links.

Things to do

Look for small flowers like this pink nodding orchid Geodorum densiflorum growing on the forest floor. Photo: Matthew Price.

Look for small flowers like this pink nodding orchid Geodorum densiflorum growing on the forest floor. Photo: Matthew Price.

Western view from the summit. Photo: Matthew Price.

Western view from the summit. Photo: Matthew Price.

Stunted woodland growing around the summit. Photo: Matthew Price.

Stunted woodland growing around the summit. Photo: Matthew Price.

Allocasuarina rigida subsp. exsul is found only on Mount Cooroora. Photo: Robert Lamont.

Allocasuarina rigida subsp. exsul is found only on Mount Cooroora. Photo: Robert Lamont.

Shared trails provide access for horse and mountain bike riders. Photo: Ross Naumann.

Shared trails provide access for horse and mountain bike riders. Photo: Ross Naumann.

Walking

One hiking track leads to the summit. Shared trails are provided around the base of the mountain for walkers, mountain bike riders and horse riders.

Be prepared for your walk, especially in hot weather. Wear a hat and sunscreen, bring sufficient water, and allow adequate time to complete the walk. Suitable, sturdy footwear is recommended as the track has a loose surface and often slippery.

Key to track standards

Choose walks that suit your fitness levels.

Class 2 track Australian standards

  • Easy level, well-graded track, suitable for all fitness levels.

Class 3 track Australian Standards

  • Gently sloping, well-defined track with slight inclines or few steps.
  • Caution needed on loose gravel surfaces and exposed natural lookouts.
  • Reasonable level of fitness and ankle-supporting footwear required.

Class 4 Australian standards

  • Distinct track, usually with steep exposed inclines or many steps.
  • Caution needed on loose gravel surfaces and exposed natural lookouts.
  • Moderate level of fitness and ankle-supporting footwear required.

Mount Cooroora hiking trail (Class 2, 3, 4)
Distance:
2 km return
Time: Allow 2 to 3 hrs walking time

Details: People with average fitness levels can enjoy a shorter walk along the first 550 m of this walk through a variety of forest types to a lookout point with coastal views. Allow about 40 mins to complete the return walk to this lookout point.

Are you fit enough for the full walk!

Beyond the first lookout point, a high level of fitness is required to walk to the summit. You climb 439 m upwards over 1.5 kms!

There are steep, rocky sections, multiple stairs and chain rope climb sections. The last 30 m to the top of the summit is a rough scramble without chains.

Natural features: Around the base of the mountain the hiking trail passes through tall open forest. As you walk upwards the plant communities change in height and species with woodlands and montane heath occurring around the summit.

Tree species growing here include blackbutt, scribbly gum, bloodwood, casuarina, brush box, ironbark and tallowwood.  A vulnerable species of she-oak, Allocasuarina rigida subsp. exsul, is found only on Mount Cooroora. You may see glossy back and yellow-tailed black cockatoos feeding on she-oak seeds.

At the top of the mountain sweeping 360 degree views include the coastal lakes and dunes of Cooloola Recreation Area.

This steep track is now world famous for its annual Pomona ‘King of the Mountain’ foot race.

Picnic and day-use areas

Opposite the summit track entrance, the Sunshine Coast Regional Council’s Cooroora Mountain Park offers picnic tables, barbecues and tap water.

Other activities

Mountain bike riders and horse riders can use shared trails provided around the base of the mountain. These trails are also shared with walkers.

Some trails continue outside the park on the Noosa Trail Network, linking to Cooran and Kin Kin.

For more details about horse riding opportunities see the SEQ horse riding trail network.

For more information about mountain bike riding and horse riding.

Things to know before you go

Essentials to bring

  • Bring insect repellent to discourage mosquitoes, leeches and ticks.
  • Bring your own drinking water—this is not provided. Creek water is unsuitable for drinking as it may contain organisms that can cause illness.
  • No bins are provided. Bring rubbish bags to remove your rubbish and recyclables from the park.

Permits and fees

Large groups and commercial users may need to obtain an organised event or commercial activity permit.

Pets

Domestic animals are not permitted in Tuchekoi National Park with the exception of horses that are only permitted on designated shared trails.

Climate and Weather

The Tuchekoi National Park area has a mild, subtropical climate. The average daily temperature range is 18 °C to 30 °C or above in summer and 6 °C to 23 °C in winter.

Always check weather conditions before your visit. Check park alerts for current warnings or park closures.

For more information see or the Bureau of Meteorology  and tourism information links.

Fuel and Supplies

Fuel and supplies are available at Pomona and other nearby towns in the region. For more information see the tourism information links.

Staying safe

Take care around the summit area and be aware of cliff edges. Photo: Ross Naumann.

Take care around the summit area and be aware of cliff edges. Photo: Ross Naumann.

  • Sheer cliffs and slippery rocks can be hazardous. Always supervise children, keep to the walking tracks, stay behind safety fences and follow all warning signs to avoid tragedy.
  • Stay on track. Tell a responsible person where you are going and your likely return time. It is recommended you walk with at least one other person. Pace yourself and take regular breaks.
  • Supervise children. Natural areas have hazards that children are unfamiliar with, including creeks, cliff edges, stinging plants and wildlife.
  • Be prepared for your walk, especially in hot weather. Wear a hat and sunscreen, carry sufficient water, and allow adequate time to complete the walk in daylight hours. Suitable, sturdy footwear is recommended.
  • Carry a first-aid kit—and know how to use it. Use repellent on exposed skin and shoes to discourage mosquitoes, leeches and ticks. Remove ticks immediately.
  • Human food is not for wildlife—it can cause overpopulation, illness and aggressive behaviour.
  • Check Park alerts for current warnings or closures. Closures can occur during severe wet weather, during high winds and for fire management. For your safety, do not enter the park when closure signs are displayed.
  • For all emergencies phone Triple Zero (000). Mobile phone reception is poor in these areas. If you have difficulty connecting to Triple Zero (000) from your mobile phone, try dialling 112.

For more information about staying safe while visiting national parks, please read the guidelines on safety in parks and forests.

Looking after the park

Enjoy the view while visiting and remember to tread lightly. Photo: Matthew Price.

Enjoy the view while visiting and remember to tread lightly. Photo: Matthew Price.

Tuchekoi provides essential habitat for many plants and animals. Look after their home by being a minimal impact visitor and leaving no trace of your visit.

  • Take all your rubbish out of the park. Remove excess food packaging at home before your visit to the forest, and pack strong sealable bags or containers to store food and rubbish.
  • Keep creeks clean—they provide valuable habitat for wildlife including rare frogs.
  • Leave your domestic animals at home. They are not allowed in Tuckekoi National Park. Domestic animals can distress or kill native animals that live here.
  • Stay on track. Minimise erosion by staying on formed tracks.

See the guidelines on caring for parks and forests for more information about protecting our environment and heritage in parks.

Park management

The Department of National Parks, Sports and Racing (NPSR) manages these parks and forests under the Nature Conservation Act 1992.

See management plans and strategies for further information on park management.

Tourism information links

Parkyn’s Hut Information Centre
www.visitnoosa.com.au 
Poinciana Ave Tewantin Qld 4565
ph: (07) 5449 7353
email: info@visitnoosa.com.au

Noosa Visitor Information Centre
www.visitnoosa.com.au 
Hastings Street, Noosa Heads (opposite the roundabout) Qld 4567
ph: (07) 5430 5000 or 13000 NOOSA (66672)
email: info@visitnoosa.com.au 

Noosa Marina Information Centre
www.visitnoosa.com.au 
2 Parkyn Court, Noosa Harbour Marine Village
Tewantin, Noosa Heads Qld 4567
ph: (07) 5430 5000
email: info@visitnoosa.com.au 

For tourism information for all regions in Queensland see Queensland Holidays.

Further information

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Last updated
6 February 2013